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Paint Dissolving

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  • Member since
    January 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
  • 17,211 posts
Posted by SeeYou190 on Wednesday, July 13, 2022 11:21 AM

I have never used Mission Models paint myself, but it was something I was going to try. Thank you for the report, and I will not be testing this line for myself.

Good luck fixing the issues.

-Kevin

Living the dream and happily modeling my STRATTON AND GILLETTE Railroad in HO scale. The SGRR is a freelanced Class A railroad as it would have appeared on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954, in my personal fantasy world of plausible nonsense.

  • Member since
    May 2008
  • From: Miles City, Montana
  • 2,092 posts
Posted by FRRYKid on Wednesday, July 13, 2022 2:55 AM

FRRYKid

I used another color from the same company (Mission Models) on.another project without a problem. 

The other car I used the Mission Models paint on is starting to do the dissovle thing a little too. (Not ro the extreme of the first one but still.) I think that I get rid of the bottles as soon as I'm done with the two cars. Those paints have given me nothing but problems. Even the airbrush thinned paints haven't caused this many problems!

"The only stupid question is the unasked question."
Brain waves can power an electric train. RealFact #832 from Snapple.
  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: west coast
  • 7,310 posts
Posted by rrebell on Monday, July 11, 2022 11:01 PM

Days, even sprayed it takes almost a week to fully cure according to the pros, I know brush on stuff can take at least a week or more, thicker can take months.

  • Member since
    May 2008
  • From: Miles City, Montana
  • 2,092 posts
Posted by FRRYKid on Monday, July 11, 2022 7:55 PM

The paint was allowed to cure for a number of days while I was rounding up decals. I used another color from the same company (Mission Models) on.another project without a problem. Just plain weird to me.

"The only stupid question is the unasked question."
Brain waves can power an electric train. RealFact #832 from Snapple.
  • Member since
    January 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
  • 17,211 posts
Posted by SeeYou190 on Monday, July 11, 2022 12:47 PM

There are some "water soluable" paints that will lose their binder strength when thinned with water. Wargamers have seen this effect when spraying Dullcote over improperly thinned paints.

If you thinned the paint with water, this might be the case. Just supposing here... When these paints are thinned with water, you are not just thinning the pigment, but also the binder and adhesive contents as well.

That is why I always recommend thinning "water soluable" paints with the manufacturer's suggested thinner, and not water.

Unfortunately, Delta Ceramcoat discontinued their EXCELLENT thinner, so now I do not use that line of paints.

-Kevin

Living the dream and happily modeling my STRATTON AND GILLETTE Railroad in HO scale. The SGRR is a freelanced Class A railroad as it would have appeared on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954, in my personal fantasy world of plausible nonsense.

  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: Canada, eh?
  • 13,241 posts
Posted by doctorwayne on Monday, July 11, 2022 12:03 PM

I think that rrebell has nailed it:  simple watercolour paints are nowhere near as durable as acrylics (and I'm not trying to re-open previous suggestions that I've made regarding airbrushing).
Heavily-applied acrylics, especially those applied by brush, do require a longer time to fully cure.

Wayne

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: west coast
  • 7,310 posts
Posted by rrebell on Monday, July 11, 2022 8:48 AM

Paint was not cured, acrylic pain cures, not drys. It can seem to be dry and handling is fine but depending on how thick the paint is applied it can take weeks to cure. In the 1-1 world many a begining artist has hung  a peice of art with really think paint that they thought was good to go, only to have some of the paint start to sag using acrylics, you brush painted so I would say you had a thicker spot.

  • Member since
    May 2008
  • From: Miles City, Montana
  • 2,092 posts
Paint Dissolving
Posted by FRRYKid on Monday, July 11, 2022 3:50 AM

Got a weird one for my Forum friends this time. Has anybody ever had Microset (the blue stuff) dissolve and remove paint? I was doing some decaling on a model before I do some weathering on it. (Some decals will go on before the weathering and some after due to the way the weathering looks against the lettering.) I was trying to apply a decal to the car and the solution proceeded to remove a section of the paint. It was just on one section of the car and all the other paint is fine. With as much decaling as I have done over the years, I have never seen paint do this. (I have seen some paint be removed when using Microsol to remove decals and lettering but not to this extent.) The paint is water-based and was brush painted.

Any ideas on what I did so that I can avoid doing it again or is this just a major-league fluke?

As usual, any assistance that I can be provided would be most welcomed.

"The only stupid question is the unasked question."
Brain waves can power an electric train. RealFact #832 from Snapple.

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