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Laying PECO Code 83 Flex Track

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  • Member since
    December 2021
  • 4 posts
Laying PECO Code 83 Flex Track
Posted by Sierra9094 on Wednesday, December 1, 2021 3:10 AM

I usually use the Atlas spike to fix my track to my layout.  I don't like gluing because it's so messy and permanent.  So today I tried something I have been noodling for a while.  I used a pin nailer.  But the problem with using a pin nailer is pressure, depth, steadiness and consistancy. So I put a little contraption together which is very simple and helped a lot.  I think it would help if you had a fancy pin nailer with depth control, but I was working with a Campbell Hausfeld 23 gauge pin nailer, and it does not have depth control.

 So I fancied up a tube like doo-dad from somewhere, I think left over from a tool I bought, and cut a slot in it to place over a singel track tie, fairly in the center.  The pin nailer nose will fit over the top of the doo-dad in the hole, while the slot holds the doo-dad over the track tie, press the trigger and wala, track nailed.  I will attach some photos to give a better idea if I can.

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Posted by Sierra9094 on Wednesday, December 1, 2021 5:31 PM

I am trying to uplaod photos of my gadget.

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Posted by Sierra9094 on Wednesday, December 1, 2021 5:51 PM

     Hello, I hope this makes the post.  The first photo is the dod-dad on the track.  The second is it with the pin nailer inserted in the hole the third is the doo-dad by itself. The forth is the doo-dad before I, er, operated and modified it to it's new purpose.  I really got tired of nailing with the Atlas and spike hammer, where if you miss, especially with code 83 track, you leave a serious ding in the track like a dent.  You can't get it out once it is in there.  This eliminates that and should you remove the track, you can do so without destroying the tie, as (theoretically) it will pry up with enough pressure, leaving only a tiny pin hole.  The trick is adjusting the height and pressure, which really wasn't too hard.  I really don't know what the doo-dad is, I think it came with a router I bought.  Don't know what it's for either, but should I need it, I'll know where it went.  Have fun and enjoy!

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Posted by Sierra9094 on Wednesday, December 1, 2021 5:58 PM

One more thing guys and gals, and this is important.  Do this at your own risk and USE GOGGLES OR SAFETY GLASSES  AND  EAR PROTECTION.  You're gonna be right upon this thing, and a misalignment, bad aim or hidden obstruction could send a pin nail flying in unexpected directions.  So save yourseleves a trip to the emergancy room.

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Posted by Lastspikemike on Thursday, December 2, 2021 6:30 PM

Sierra9094

One more thing guys and gals, and this is important.  Do this at your own risk and USE GOGGLES OR SAFETY GLASSES  AND  EAR PROTECTION.  You're gonna be right upon this thing, and a misalignment, bad aim or hidden obstruction could send a pin nail flying in unexpected directions.  So save yourseleves a trip to the emergancy room.

 

Yup. 

I have a modelling hammer with a variety of hammer "faces". The face I use is brass faced. It's for model shipbuilding. 

If you choose to use power then the jig described in this thread (but not yet pictured as far as I can see) is ingenious and dare I say idiot proof.

Not hitting the rails is relatively easy when using my tiny lightweight hammer but overdriving the track nail is far too easy. For Peco track particularly this doodad would be really useful. I may fabricate one even though my little hammer delivers sufficient force.

 Peco rail pops out of the spike heads ridiculously easily and is a rpita to put back in. Atlas track is far more robust in this respect but the tie breaks rather than letting go of the rail. You pays your money and you takes your chances. 

Alyth Yard

Canada

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Posted by BigDaddy on Thursday, December 2, 2021 6:46 PM

Sierra9094
I am trying to uplaod photos of my gadget.

That's not possible.  The forum has unique guidelines for posting photos, briefly they have to be on the Internet is a site that does not require login.

That means no google, facebook or copy and paste.   I use Imgur.com, it is free and copy the BBLink directly as text, not a the link or picture icon.

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

Shenandoah Valley

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Posted by rrebell on Thursday, December 2, 2021 8:40 PM

Caulking is not very messy and is not permanit.

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Thursday, December 2, 2021 9:07 PM

Sierra9094
I will attach some photos to give a better idea if I can.

Please do.

Weekend Photo Fun will start in a few hours, please feel encouraged to share there as well.

-Kevin

Happily modeling in HO scale. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by doctorwayne on Friday, December 3, 2021 12:23 PM

Sounds like a lot of work and specialised equipment.  I use Atlas track, with the holes for nails showing on the underside of the ties...simply poke-through from the bottom with an Atlas track nail.
You could easily use a suitably-sized drill bit to create holes in the Peco ties, then use the Atlas track nails and a pair of pliers to nail the track in place - no need for pounding those tiny nails with a hammer.
I haven't bothered to remove the nails, as the open holes would be just as noticeable as the nailheads.
Once your track has been ballasted, it should stay in place if you wish to remove the nails.

Wayne

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Posted by riogrande5761 on Friday, December 3, 2021 12:27 PM

doctorwayne

Sounds like a lot of work and specialised equipment.  I use Atlas track, with the holes for nails showing on the underside of the ties...simply poke-through from the bottom with an Atlas track nail.
You could easily use a suitably-sized drill bit to create holes in the Peco ties, then use the Atlas track nails and a pair of pliers to nail the track in place - no need for pounding those tiny nails with a hammer.
I haven't bothered to remove the nails, as the open holes would be just as noticeable as the nailheads.
Once your track has been ballasted, it should stay in place if you wish to remove the nails.

Wayne

 

I'm in the process of laying Peco code 83 and I'm using a pin vise to drill holes at about 4 1/4 intervals in the center of each tie.  I may pull them out later after the track has been ballasted.

Rio Grande.  The Action Road  - Focus 1977-1983

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Posted by doctorwayne on Friday, December 3, 2021 1:06 PM

That's some really good-looking trackwork, Jim.  BowBow

 

Wayne

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