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Yard Ladders

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  • Member since
    January 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
  • 15,305 posts
Posted by SeeYou190 on Thursday, August 5, 2021 9:59 PM

Pruitt
Well, I'd say that if you do your trackwork carefully, either way will work fine. Probably the second arrangement is more common on the prototype,

I agree 100% with this comment.

-Kevin

Living the dream and happily modeling my STRATTON AND GILLETTE Railroad in HO scale. The SGRR is a freelanced Class A railroad as it would have appeared on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954, in my personal fantasy world of plausible nonsense.

  • Member since
    March 2013
  • 379 posts
Posted by Colorado Ray on Thursday, August 5, 2021 7:58 PM

As I recall your operating position for the yard is at the top.  If you are using manual switches, the first option will let you turn the switch without having to reach over cars.  You'll also have better sight control of the ends of each track.  The slight curves in each yard track might add some visual interest as well.

 

Ray

  • Member since
    April 2018
  • 170 posts
Posted by Outsailing86 on Thursday, August 5, 2021 11:47 AM

Second one, railroads like more storage track length too

  • Member since
    September 2004
  • From: Dearborn Station
  • 22,690 posts
Posted by richhotrain on Thursday, August 5, 2021 11:20 AM

The second one for sure.

Rich

Alton Junction

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: 4610 Metre's North of the Fortyninth on the left coast of Canada
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Posted by BATMAN on Thursday, August 5, 2021 11:15 AM

I am the last person who should be advising you on a yard but the second one looks better to me.

On another note, over the years I have read that caboose tracks are best double-ended run-around tracks so as to access a certain caboose easier, in the old days the caboose was often assigned to the conductor. Can you plug your caboose track into that track it butts up against?

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

https://www.youtube.com/user/BATTRAIN1/videos 

You can never ever out-train bad nutrition.

  • Member since
    May 2004
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Posted by 7j43k on Thursday, August 5, 2021 11:00 AM

MSM

...reduce the amount of derailments?

 

 

The second one, as it has one less curve to navigate.  Also, curved track in the body tracks of a model yard has more potential to irritate than straight track.

Considering the prototype, it looks much easier for the engineer to see the switchmen in the second one.

 

Ed

  • Member since
    February 2001
  • From: Wyoming, where men are men, and sheep are nervous!
  • 3,117 posts
Posted by Pruitt on Thursday, August 5, 2021 10:35 AM

Well, I'd say that if you do your trackwork carefully, either way will work fine.

Probably the second arrangement is more common on the prototype, but I'm pretty sure layouts like the first one could be found on the prototype as well, especially in the past, whern there were many more yards.

So pick the one you like best and have at!

MSM
  • Member since
    July 2021
  • 31 posts
Yard Ladders
Posted by MSM on Thursday, August 5, 2021 9:40 AM

Thank everyone for taking the time to comment on this post, I really appricate it.  Now that the West yard is complete I'll be moving on to the East yard...

Which option would be more prototypical and reduce the amount of derailments?  Turnouts are all #6 and the radius of the turn on the left 38 1/2

Thanks...

 

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