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Pipe in the corner... How do I build benchwork around this?

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Pipe in the corner... How do I build benchwork around this?
Posted by Harrison on Sunday, April 11, 2021 3:54 PM

Hello all, 

I've started building the second section of my layout, which will go into the corner. The problem is, there's this pipe in the corner:

 The odvious solution is to build the frame around the pipe, but I have no idea how I would screw that corner together. The other idea I had was to just set the benchwork back along the wall and have the foam extend past the benchwork, with the corner cut out for the pipe.

The backdrop will curve around the corner and will hide the pipe. I'm not going to try and make the pipe look like a storage tank or anything. 

Thanks in advance!

Harrison

Homeschooler living In upstate NY a.k.a Northern NY.

Modeling the D&H in 1978.

Route of the famous "Montreal Limited"

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Posted by Overmod on Sunday, April 11, 2021 4:08 PM

You may have to re-post: I can see just enough to get the frames of two pictures, but nothing else about them; in the actual post there's just a big white space.

You may have to post the URLs to the pictures if the site you're using, or Kalmbach, has cracked down on resolving inline links...

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Posted by richhotrain on Sunday, April 11, 2021 4:17 PM

What is the shape of the second section of the new layout?

It is unclear what you mean about how you would "screw that corner together".

Rich

Alton Junction

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Posted by Track fiddler on Sunday, April 11, 2021 4:40 PM

I would snap your two level lines on the walls.  Build your framing so the right end towards the pipe is left off.  Keep the board ends three quarters of an inch shy of the wall so the board of the other framing can tuck behind.  Let your wall ledger board on the right framing run wild the width of the other frame tucked behind the pipe.  Then use 90° angle brackets to attach in the corner and the one outside the pipe.  (Unless you happen to have a Kreg Jig, then use that).  Pre attached the inside corner angle bracket on the one side where you can't reach with the screw gun.  And better yet install the right framing first.

I'm on a break in the truck so please excuse the crudity of my drawing.  

That's the way we frame soffits around a pipe in the corner.  Hope that helps Harrison.

 

P.S.  This works too if your pipe is really tight in the corner.

 

 

TF

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Posted by dehusman on Sunday, April 11, 2021 5:50 PM

A lot of it depends on how you are building your benchwork. 

Simple open grid with a plywood or foam top, I would use the frames that Track Fiddler drew, except end the top frame just befor the pipe and not attach it to the right wall.  Then just put plywood over the top.  It will self support for the 4-6" over hang.

Dave H. Painted side goes up. My website : wnbranch.com

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Posted by Snip on Sunday, April 11, 2021 6:09 PM

Decades ago, my landlord had an N-scale layout in his basement, next to my apartment.

He had a large iron (sewer) pipe in one corner. He disguised it as an erupting volcano.

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Posted by Overmod on Sunday, April 11, 2021 6:13 PM

Snip
He had a large iron (sewer) pipe in one corner. He disguised it as an erupting volcano.

You could always paint it a sort of dirty brown, arrange some broken cars and trucks around the bottom, and say you're modeling Chester's Mill...

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Posted by woodone on Sunday, April 11, 2021 6:44 PM

My first question is, what is the pipe for? If you enclose it will you ever need to repair or replace it at a latter date? Then I will have a better idea has what might be done.

 

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Posted by doctorwayne on Sunday, April 11, 2021 7:52 PM

In the photos, the pipe looks like it's only inch-and-a-half - a drain for a sink, perhaps. 
T.F.'s second sketch would work just fine for that, although you could simply scab-on a piece of 2"x4" to the member that runs along the wall to the right.  You could then continue-on along the second wall. 
If the pipe is bigger than it appear's, though, T.F.'s sketch will definitely take care of it.

Wayne

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Posted by PC101 on Sunday, April 11, 2021 11:49 PM

What I am seeing is, it looks to be 3/4'' copper for the baseboard heat. 

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Posted by "JaBear" on Monday, April 12, 2021 2:56 AM
Gidday Harrison, I’m having a little difficulty in determining the pipe diameter but if it ain’t too big, would leave it exposed as a tall chimney for an industry.
I like Mr TFs second solution regarding the framing.
My 2 CentsCheers, the Bear.Smile

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

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Posted by Harrison on Monday, April 12, 2021 7:24 AM

Thank you all for the help, I kind of forgot I posted here, so sorry for the late reply. I really like Track Fiddler's idea. The pipe is for the baseboard heater. Here are the links for the photos (I think).

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1xlzd_N0pdNPvdVpGC6VbKOrlczPZ2bbN/view?usp=sharing

https://drive.google.com/file/d/11zRJEgv8rrRPVQP1a-g7iuzomdQpaSNe/view?usp=sharing

I will review my options and decide what to do. I think TF's design is the best though...

Harrison

Homeschooler living In upstate NY a.k.a Northern NY.

Modeling the D&H in 1978.

Route of the famous "Montreal Limited"

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Posted by hornblower on Monday, April 12, 2021 7:38 PM

A simple "coved" backdrop made from .040" sheet styrene or similar material could be placed in front of the pipe.  Glue the edges of the styrene to the wall surfaces, add a little filler to hide the left and right edges, then paint!  

Hornblower

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Posted by BATMAN on Wednesday, April 14, 2021 9:54 AM

With the suggestion from TF, you could mount a backdrop similar to this.

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

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Posted by Doughless on Wednesday, April 14, 2021 12:17 PM

 

If you're going to use 1xs as cleat along the wall like this image, you don't have to attach them all the way to the corner.  If you're lucky, there will be a stud less than 16 inches from the corners.  If not, wood has some strength a few inches beyond the attachment point.

I would extend the 1x4 cleats 8 inches past the nearest stud into the corner on both walls, then just 45 degree the benchwork in the corner.  The table top can extend 2 inches past the 45 degree support and you won't be losing much space.

Or, just put a leg in the corner in front of the pipe.

- Douglas

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Posted by BATMAN on Wednesday, April 14, 2021 2:26 PM

Doughless

 

If you're going to use 1xs as cleat along the wall like this image, you don't have to attach them all the way to the corner.  If you're lucky, there will be a stud less than 16 inches from the corners.  If not, wood has some strength a few inches beyond the attachment point.

I would extend the 1x4 cleats 8 inches past the nearest stud into the corner on both walls, then just 45 degree the benchwork in the corner.  The table top can extend 2 inches past the 45 degree support and you won't be losing much space.

Or, just put a leg in the corner in front of the pipe.

 

Actually, the benchwork is free-standing not attached to the wall. I did not want wall damage to fix when we move. It is solid in place.

 

I will have a canyon to the floor here.

 

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

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Posted by Track fiddler on Wednesday, April 14, 2021 2:33 PM

Hey thanks for all the Kudos here guys, glad I could help Harrison.

I like that wrap around backdrop of yours Brent.  It would hide the pipe and create a seamless corner too.   Nice!

I'll definitely be doing that when I ever get to that point.

 

 

 

TF

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Posted by BATMAN on Wednesday, April 14, 2021 2:41 PM

Track fiddler

Hey thanks for all the Kudos here guys, glad I could help Harrison.

I like that wrap around backdrop of yours Brent.  It would hide the pipe and create a seamless corner too.   Nice!

 

 

 

TF

 

Thanks, TF.

I just notched out where the backdrop goes over the corner. It is connected to the bench with 10/32 machine screws into T-nuts behind the hardboard. It will come apart real fast when the day comes using the drill. In fact, anything I want to come apart is held together with 10/32 machine screws and T-nuts. The layout while not portable is quite movable and can come down quickly.

 

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

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Posted by Track fiddler on Wednesday, April 14, 2021 2:59 PM

The site froze up on me again.

Great looking layout design, everything is reachable.  I can see you put a lot of nice work into that. 

I had given thought at times how I'm going to attach my backdrop to the layout when I get to that point,  Now I knowYes  Thanks

 

 

 

TF

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Posted by BATMAN on Wednesday, April 14, 2021 3:20 PM

There's those T-nuts again holding the legs on. I just undo them and lift the

table-top right off and come back for the legs.

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

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Posted by Track fiddler on Wednesday, April 14, 2021 3:26 PM

I have seen those things before Brent but I can honestly say in all my years of construction I have never used them.  Those will be the cat's meow for me because someday I want to take my layout to the train shows for the Kids to see.  I will have to remove the backdrop and put it back on.  No fumbling around under the table to put on the nut.   Nice!

 

Thanks again

 

 

 

TF

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Posted by Harrison on Thursday, April 15, 2021 8:02 PM

Ok, so here's a quick update. While TF's idea was a good one, we ultimately decided we wanted the layout to be easily moveable, hence not confined by the pipe. SO, I "inverted" the corner. I may strenthen this with some angle iron. 

 https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Q9L6IEsjP5Fp3YgnaNiV6SG0XXkd1mLo/view?usp=sharing

 

Harrison

Homeschooler living In upstate NY a.k.a Northern NY.

Modeling the D&H in 1978.

Route of the famous "Montreal Limited"

My YouTube

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Posted by Doughless on Friday, April 16, 2021 6:47 AM

Inverting the corner does not achieve the most strength. 

One board at 45 degrees would make the corner much stronger. 

Leave the other two boards overhang into the corner as much as possible, it doesn't matter.  Your only concern would be where the 45 dgree board attaches to the other two boards also in not the point where the other two boards attach to the wall studs.

You can add a 45 degree board to the inside of what you already made, but it would be best to simply replace the inverted corner with a shorter board installed 45 degrees between the other two boards.

The way it is now, you would need a leg to support the corner, and then you'd have to stabilize the leg.

- Douglas

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Posted by Lastspikemike on Friday, April 16, 2021 8:47 AM

It would be easier to just "move the corner" rather than triangulate or invert. Your proposed inverted corner will be very weak.

Choose one direction for a long board and screw the "extension" width needed to clear the pipe to that.

In other words, build the corner on one side of the pipe and just add an extension frame  to the other side of the corner clearing the pipe. 

The sketches posted earlier show this simple method of moving the actual corner out from one wall so as to clear the pipe. Use Track Fiddler's second sketch and your frame will be both portable and strong.  

Alyth Yard

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Friday, April 16, 2021 8:59 AM

Harrison
While TF's idea was a good one, we ultimately decided we wanted the layout to be easily moveable, hence not confined by the pipe. SO, I "inverted" the corner. I may strenthen this with some angle iron. 

Harrrison, it looks good. TF is a sharp guy.

I would simply add one more brace glued to the small corner piece as shown in red in this picture.

You are doing great!

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by Lastspikemike on Friday, April 16, 2021 9:21 AM

Exactly. One of your short boards isn't needed and can be removed if you wish. It adds no strength. 

Alyth Yard

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Posted by Track fiddler on Friday, April 16, 2021 9:33 AM

Looks great Harrison.  Nice job!  I really like Kevin's idea for extra stability and to keep everything aligned.

By the time you get your sheathing attached, whether plywood or foam, what you have going there will be more than sturdy enough for models, some plaster and HO or N scale locomotives.  Let's face it, I don't think you're going to be standing up there or storing stacks of barbell weights in the corner.

 

Perfect!

 

 

 

TF

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Posted by spe3376 on Friday, April 16, 2021 10:11 AM

Harrison

The pipe is for the baseboard heater.

If that pipe is the on the supply side of the heater, you could be looking at water temperatures up to 180 Degrees, maybe higher depending on your boiler setting and how close the piping is to the boiler - making the pipe itself almost that hot.  I would be careful about the scenery you plan to use and its proximity to the pipe.

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Posted by Harrison on Friday, April 16, 2021 4:37 PM

I have attached another cross piece as Kevin suggested. I will post photos in the Weekend Photo Fun thread when I get around to it. Thanks for the suggestions everyone!

Harrison

Homeschooler living In upstate NY a.k.a Northern NY.

Modeling the D&H in 1978.

Route of the famous "Montreal Limited"

My YouTube

  • Member since
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  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
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Posted by SeeYou190 on Friday, April 16, 2021 10:07 PM

spe3376
If that pipe is the on the supply side of the heater, you could be looking at water temperatures up to 180 Degrees, maybe higher depending on your boiler setting

Good heavens! Do you guys really run 180 degree water in your pipes?

That is lierally scaldingly hot.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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