Trains.com

Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

Planning a long Viaduct

1769 views
1 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Planning a long Viaduct
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, December 7, 2003 8:22 PM
I am planning my new layout and I wi***o include a compressed model of the C&O double tracked viaduct along the James River through Richmond, Virginia. The real viaduct is currently owned and operated by the CSX and is used to ship coal and general merchandise to the coast. I don't ever recall seeing stack trains or pigs on it.

The model will be about fifteen feet including some through girder spans, deck girder spans and deck truss spans. One bit will be a hinged section to allow entry to the room from an exterior door. I have many ideas about this model, but I am curious if any of y'all have some wisdom you want to pass on before I get too far into the planning of this important model.

Incidently, if you haven't considered a viaduct section on your layout, I hope you think about it. In addition to being very visually interesting, a viaduct is great for operations because they often require some speed restriction. This makes operation more interesting and makes the distance seem a bit longer.

Also in case you are thinking about a long bridge, Micro Engineering makes 36 inch long (HO scale) bridge flex track with proper ties and refuges for the water barrels. Using long track (or rail in some cases) helps maintain electrical conductivity on the bridge just like it does on the main line.

Wish me Luck - Ed
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, December 8, 2003 1:23 AM
Ed:

Have a look at Kalmbach's Model Railroad Bridges & Trestles. It has some plans which will exercise your modeling skills as well as teach you some of the basic engineering conventions which will give you some background in the rationale for why bridges look the way they do.

Good luck

Randy

Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

Users Online

There are no community member online

Search the Community

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
Model Railroader Newsletter See all
Sign up for our FREE e-newsletter and get model railroad news in your inbox!