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Which Type Of Track ?

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  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Which Type Of Track ?
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, November 12, 2003 10:48 AM
Hello,
I'm doing an N Gauge Layout 10 x 7. I'm undecided in which type of track to use. Should I use Kato Unitrack or Peco Code 55. Kato is very expensive and seems to have limited accesories. The gray plastic roadbed seems to be a problem when doing a western scene and wanting to add a different color ballast to it. Is this really a problem?
With Peco Flex the problem I find is how to bend it to get the proper curves without kinking it. Is there a special way to avoid this?
Please let me know your opinion on which one I should use. If there is any better track out there please let me know also.

Thank You,

Louie
  • Member since
    November 2002
  • From: Winnipeg, Manitoba
  • 1,317 posts
Posted by Seamonster on Wednesday, November 12, 2003 3:51 PM
In my opinion, I don't think there is one "right" kind of track. I feel it's a personal preference of each person as to what they like best and what works best for them. I've got both Peco and Atlas N scale flex track, sectional track and turnouts on my layout and I have no preference, at least not for track.

As for bending flextrack, here's how I do it and I've never kinked a piece of track yet. Mind you, I use code 80 track, which is more sturdy than the code 55 you are using, but the same method should work. You'll just have to be more gentle and take a little more care. I hold the track in the centre in both hands with my thumbs on the ends of the ties on one side and my fingers on the other side, hands about 6" or so apart. I then pull the track against my thumbs to start the curve. The secret is not to go for the final curve in one bend, take it a little bit at a time. Then I slide my hands further apart and continue bending, repeating this until I reach the end of the track. Then I start over in the middle, making the bend a little sharper.

When you let go, the track will spring back a little. When I've got it to the desired bend, I mark the end of the longer rail even with the shorter rail and cut it off. Then I connect that end to the existing track, and ease it into the final curve on the roadbed using the same finger-thumb technique and pin it down.

It just takes a little patience and bending it a little bit at a time. Good luck.

...Bob

..... Bob

Beam me up, Scotty, there's no intelligent life down here. (Captain Kirk)

I reject your reality and substitute my own. (Adam Savage)

Resistance is not futile--it is voltage divided by current.

  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: Ridgeville,South Carolina
  • 1,294 posts
Posted by willy6 on Thursday, November 13, 2003 7:22 PM
ATLAS is the best in all model railroading!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Being old is when you didn't loose it, it's that you just can't remember where you put it.

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