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swing gate with using simple carpentry

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  • Member since
    February 2002
  • From: within earshot of CP
  • 64 posts
swing gate with using simple carpentry
Posted by scotttmason on Monday, November 10, 2003 3:02 PM
Got an idea while reading another thread about avoiding a duck-under along with achieving continuous running option. Worked up a sequence for construction of an area to become a gate as a single assembly. Then, by parting section at a pre-determined locations, the gate section is freed without a lot of hastle.

http://www.goesstudio.com/tutorials/swing_gate.pdf

This may have been done already; but could be a good solution to gate construction either way. Haven't gotten this far in my construction so just a concept at this point.

Thoughts welcomed.
Got my own basement now; benchwork done but no trains, yet.
  • Member since
    September 2002
  • 7,452 posts
Posted by ndbprr on Monday, November 10, 2003 3:42 PM
A swing gate is an excellent way to go if you remember these considerations:
1. Make sure there is adequate space for it to swing open and adequate space to stand in to close it
2. Make it is the shape of a triangle so it won't sag
3. C clamp the finshed product in place to insure it is level and functioning before superglueing (joking :-) ) it in place
4. Use a long hinge like a piano hinge for maximum support the full length of the support leg. This is much better and aligns better than two door hinges
5. Consider weighting the gate so it swings shut on its own in case your interlock fails
6. Use something with a pin (two holes with a nail will work) to make sure it is alligned for operation and interlock 2-3 feet of track on either side to prevent catostrophic events from occurring when it is open. You can only catch so many cars and engines doing the half gainer
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, November 11, 2003 4:40 AM
Maybe you could set it up so when the gate is open, some kind of barrier raises across the tracks to avoid disasters? You could rig it so that when the gate is closed, the lever you use to lock it in place also lowers the barrier. Failing that, you could consider "Catch Points" (I think these are called derails in the US, they're used to prevent rolling stock "running away" and ending up on the main line). Peco offer these. just fit them a decent distance away from the gate and consider some form of electrical interlock so they can't be switched to allow stuff to run over them when the gate is open.
  • Member since
    September 2002
  • 7,452 posts
Posted by ndbprr on Tuesday, November 11, 2003 8:07 AM
Those suggestions involve a LOT of mechanical interlocks that require maintenance and fine tuning. Previous builders of removable bridges and gate have used electrical interlocks that are much easier to maintain. I recall one individual who had two holes drilled in which he placed a drop or two of mercury to contact the wires when the bridge was in place. I have also seen contacts, reed switches and other methods used. If they control 2-3' either side of the chasm it is very difficult to have a train take the plunge and a lot easier to troubleshoot and maintain.

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