Trains.com

Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

First time layout

2864 views
8 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    October 2003
  • From: Southold,NY
  • 7 posts
First time layout
Posted by docb on Thursday, October 30, 2003 9:10 PM
I am in the process of planning my first large HO layout and would welcome any hints. What would be the minimum radius that would be appropriate for 12 wheeled passenger cars? The space I will be using is 12 x 16 feet with the entry door on one of the 16 foot sides. I would perfer to have a looping layout so that I can have continuous moving trains.
  • Member since
    October 2012
  • 527 posts
Posted by eastcoast on Thursday, October 30, 2003 9:53 PM
hey docb,[:p]
Ken_ecr here. Here is exactly what I can suggest. Before anything else,have a plan and KNOW what you want and where you want to go with that layout. Things like,will you move soon or can it be permanent? For a room that size, if you are into the trains and less scenery, shelf layout may work to maximize the curve radius,especially for those passenger cars. But do your homework FIRST. Read all you can and when you do start, go slow and just enjoy the time creating your world. Dreamers do have a purpose in life. OK, case in point, I will describe my layout;
My trainroom is 12.6 x 13 with a closet area. I run an around the room shelf no wider than 26" in a spot( easier to work on and reach) and average 24" wide. I run three mainlines, one that crosses over the other two so that my 85 foot passenger cars can benefit on the 28"radius curves. Only problem I have run into is that I have to have a duckunder at my doorway( 3 tracks worth.)My Bachmann Acela has really long cars and needs these wide curves. I run continuous and have spurs on two tracks for some operation diversity. I run DC because I find it easier than DCC and can wire it faster to meet my needs. AND before I start a new project, I try to read up on it and practice on a mock-up before applying it to the permanent area. Practice makes perfect.[^]
My final suggestion is to see what others are modelling as in MR mag and "dream" a little ,then, according to your skill level, try until you succeed and find the layout you want to have. Sure hope I helped. [:p]
As always, lots of luck, and welcome to the world of fun.Trains.
ken_ecr[:D]
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, October 31, 2003 10:17 AM
Here is a link to a great layout in a bedroom that is 11x13. It also happens to appear in Great Model Railroads 2004, which is available just this week.

Mike has created a fantastic layout, which provides opportunities to run trains continuously, or to do a wide variety of switching operations.

http://www.ovar.ca/Mike%20Hamer/Hamer.htm

Andrew
  • Member since
    October 2009
  • 129 posts
Posted by CP5170 on Friday, October 31, 2003 2:21 PM
Model Railroad Planning magazine has done a wonderful job of designing layout for bedrooms (12x12) in both HO and N scales. You would have the luxury of expanding any one of them.

Good Luck
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, November 1, 2003 8:44 PM
Years ago I read where one could make his own inexpensive trees to landscape a mountain scene. Goldenrod was used as the individual tree. However, I cannot recall what the procedure is to make these trees from goldenrod tops. I have cut a supply each about 10 inches tall. I have stripped the leaves off the stem (tree trunk) leaving the flower top as the tree branches, etc. Can anyone tell me if they are familiar with using goldenrod for trees, and if they need to be sprayed with clear poly or not. Many thanks, Gene
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, November 3, 2003 7:46 AM
Hi eapreston,

You might have better success if you post your question in its own thread... but here is my two cents worth:

If you are going to add ground faom foliage, then you probably do not need to spray them separately. If they look fine "as is", you probably want to shoo them with something (even cheapo "max hold" hairspray) so they do not start to drop bits over time. There is a recipe for boiling natural tree materials in glycerin, but I do not know what it is...

Hope that helps.

Andrew
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, November 3, 2003 11:41 AM
Thanks Andrew,
Yep, as a rookie I guess I got into the wrong area for my question, but thanks for your reply anyway. I don't think my goldenrod trees will stay green enough for my summer scene, so I guess I will spray paint the tops greens. After that is done, shall I then spray them with hair spray?
Gene
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, November 3, 2003 12:06 PM
The paint itself will probably be enough to hold things together, but a lot of modellers end up using dullcoat on everything to eliminate any potential "shiny-ness" from the paint. That will also hold things together. If you are going to add ground foam, the cheap hairspray helps to stick it all together.

Andrew
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, November 3, 2003 12:08 PM
docb...

I run passenger cars with 6 wheel trucks (i.e. 12 wheels per car) around 18" radius no problem. The look kind of silly because of the extreme overhang, but operationally there's no problem. They are talgo-type trucks with Kadee #5s.

Andrew

Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

Users Online

Search the Community

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
Model Railroader Newsletter See all
Sign up for our FREE e-newsletter and get model railroad news in your inbox!