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n scale layouts

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  • Member since
    April 2003
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n scale layouts
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, September 21, 2003 11:02 AM
i was wondering if you guys knew any 4 by 8 or smaller n scale trackplans..any would be appreciated[:D]
  • Member since
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n scale layouts
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, September 21, 2003 11:02 AM
i was wondering if you guys knew any 4 by 8 or smaller n scale trackplans..any would be appreciated[:D]
  • Member since
    December 2001
  • From: US
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Posted by ChrisB1962 on Sunday, September 21, 2003 12:26 PM
i studied 'nine n scale model railroads' from atlas and '101 track plans for model railroaders' fom kalmbach before starting my n scale railroad a couple of months ago. most of the 'nine n scale' layouts are 4x8 or less. '101 track plans' has a wider variety of sizes. i used plan #3 as the basis for mr 2x4 layout.
  • Member since
    December 2001
  • From: US
  • 17 posts
Posted by ChrisB1962 on Sunday, September 21, 2003 12:26 PM
i studied 'nine n scale model railroads' from atlas and '101 track plans for model railroaders' fom kalmbach before starting my n scale railroad a couple of months ago. most of the 'nine n scale' layouts are 4x8 or less. '101 track plans' has a wider variety of sizes. i used plan #3 as the basis for mr 2x4 layout.
  • Member since
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  • From: Culpeper, Va
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Posted by IRONROOSTER on Sunday, September 21, 2003 3:02 PM
Larger scale layout plans can be scaled down. An interesting idea is to take a 4x8 plan for HO but build it in N scale. The usually short sidings and sharp curves become long sidings and broad curves in N. Yards can have more tracks.
Enjoy
Paul
If you're having fun, you're doing it the right way.
  • Member since
    June 2003
  • From: Culpeper, Va
  • 8,187 posts
Posted by IRONROOSTER on Sunday, September 21, 2003 3:02 PM
Larger scale layout plans can be scaled down. An interesting idea is to take a 4x8 plan for HO but build it in N scale. The usually short sidings and sharp curves become long sidings and broad curves in N. Yards can have more tracks.
Enjoy
Paul
If you're having fun, you're doing it the right way.
  • Member since
    January 2002
  • 11 posts
Posted by rkdave on Sunday, September 21, 2003 3:25 PM
Ironrooster, I tried just what you suggest: building a 4X8 HO layout in N-Scale, but was not too pleased with the results. A 4X8 HO layout has little in the way of operational possibilities; making a 4X8 based on that track plan yields a large N scale layout with little in the way of operational possibilities.

A better route might be to take one of the MR N scale plans for a hollow core door and expanding them - in effect two 2X8 layouts (or 2.5X8 layouts with a scenic divider down the middle.
  • Member since
    January 2002
  • 11 posts
Posted by rkdave on Sunday, September 21, 2003 3:25 PM
Ironrooster, I tried just what you suggest: building a 4X8 HO layout in N-Scale, but was not too pleased with the results. A 4X8 HO layout has little in the way of operational possibilities; making a 4X8 based on that track plan yields a large N scale layout with little in the way of operational possibilities.

A better route might be to take one of the MR N scale plans for a hollow core door and expanding them - in effect two 2X8 layouts (or 2.5X8 layouts with a scenic divider down the middle.
  • Member since
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  • From: US
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Posted by AltonFan on Sunday, September 21, 2003 6:31 PM
Another approach might be to use the conversion the dimensions listed for TT scale (approximately 2/3 HO) for an N scale layout.

Dan

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    April 2003
  • From: US
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Posted by AltonFan on Sunday, September 21, 2003 6:31 PM
Another approach might be to use the conversion the dimensions listed for TT scale (approximately 2/3 HO) for an N scale layout.

Dan

  • Member since
    April 2002
  • From: Nashville TN
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Posted by Wdlgln005 on Sunday, September 21, 2003 9:25 PM
The move to build a Nscale layout in a 4x8 HO scale space should create better operational possibilities. We avoid using 9in or lower curves, keeping them up to 12-18in range. This will accomodate all modern & Eunit passenger equipment. This leaves appox 4 feet to have a larger town/ industrial area with plenty of space for more buildings. 1 siding may serve 2-4 industries. Now you have more business for your switch crew to do, or use more cars to service a larger industry. Try putting a Timesaver puzzle for your industries and you may also need a larger yard area.

Grades will benefit because you only need 1.75 in clearance. A gentle 1.5% grade will do this raising 1/4 in/foot for 7ft.
Glenn Woodle
  • Member since
    April 2002
  • From: Nashville TN
  • 1,306 posts
Posted by Wdlgln005 on Sunday, September 21, 2003 9:25 PM
The move to build a Nscale layout in a 4x8 HO scale space should create better operational possibilities. We avoid using 9in or lower curves, keeping them up to 12-18in range. This will accomodate all modern & Eunit passenger equipment. This leaves appox 4 feet to have a larger town/ industrial area with plenty of space for more buildings. 1 siding may serve 2-4 industries. Now you have more business for your switch crew to do, or use more cars to service a larger industry. Try putting a Timesaver puzzle for your industries and you may also need a larger yard area.

Grades will benefit because you only need 1.75 in clearance. A gentle 1.5% grade will do this raising 1/4 in/foot for 7ft.
Glenn Woodle
  • Member since
    June 2003
  • From: Culpeper, Va
  • 8,187 posts
Posted by IRONROOSTER on Monday, September 22, 2003 7:07 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by rkdave

Ironrooster, I tried just what you suggest: building a 4X8 HO layout in N-Scale, but was not too pleased with the results. A 4X8 HO layout has little in the way of operational possibilities; making a 4X8 based on that track plan yields a large N scale layout with little in the way of operational possibilities.

A better route might be to take one of the MR N scale plans for a hollow core door and expanding them - in effect two 2X8 layouts (or 2.5X8 layouts with a scenic divider down the middle.

Well, sort of depends on what operations you want to do. Run long trains and railfan them, run shorter trains with lots of dispatching, do lots of switching, sort cars in the yard, etc. Some of the plans for HO 4x8 are deliberately simple becasue they are designed for beginners or to give a good/realistic appearance, others are pretty complicated with lots of turnouts, track, etc. Once you know what operations you want to do, any published plan becomes a starting point to be modified to meet those objectives. For a first layout it is probably better to follow a simpler plan to get started. There's nothing like actually building something to see what you would rather have. Then you can modify or rebuild. Sounds like you have some definite ideas on what you want, based on your experience which is good. I'm building my fifth layout and each one has been different as I refine my objectives. Heck I've even changed scales twice. My current layout focuses on a double track mainline loop with a long branchline because I like to watch 'em run. I have no yard or roundhouse because that part doesn't really interest me operationally. John Armstrong's book "Track Planning for Realistic Operation" has some excellent ideas, as well as some smaller layouts.
Enjoy
Paul
If you're having fun, you're doing it the right way.
  • Member since
    June 2003
  • From: Culpeper, Va
  • 8,187 posts
Posted by IRONROOSTER on Monday, September 22, 2003 7:07 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by rkdave

Ironrooster, I tried just what you suggest: building a 4X8 HO layout in N-Scale, but was not too pleased with the results. A 4X8 HO layout has little in the way of operational possibilities; making a 4X8 based on that track plan yields a large N scale layout with little in the way of operational possibilities.

A better route might be to take one of the MR N scale plans for a hollow core door and expanding them - in effect two 2X8 layouts (or 2.5X8 layouts with a scenic divider down the middle.

Well, sort of depends on what operations you want to do. Run long trains and railfan them, run shorter trains with lots of dispatching, do lots of switching, sort cars in the yard, etc. Some of the plans for HO 4x8 are deliberately simple becasue they are designed for beginners or to give a good/realistic appearance, others are pretty complicated with lots of turnouts, track, etc. Once you know what operations you want to do, any published plan becomes a starting point to be modified to meet those objectives. For a first layout it is probably better to follow a simpler plan to get started. There's nothing like actually building something to see what you would rather have. Then you can modify or rebuild. Sounds like you have some definite ideas on what you want, based on your experience which is good. I'm building my fifth layout and each one has been different as I refine my objectives. Heck I've even changed scales twice. My current layout focuses on a double track mainline loop with a long branchline because I like to watch 'em run. I have no yard or roundhouse because that part doesn't really interest me operationally. John Armstrong's book "Track Planning for Realistic Operation" has some excellent ideas, as well as some smaller layouts.
Enjoy
Paul
If you're having fun, you're doing it the right way.
  • Member since
    February 2001
  • From: El Dorado Springs, MO
  • 1,519 posts
Posted by n2mopac on Monday, September 22, 2003 10:19 AM
My first layout was a 4' x 4' N scale which I loved and it gave me great detail modeling and operational experience as a beginner. I was able to model a loop with 2 passing sidings, 3 industrial spurs serving 4 industries, a small town and some midwestern countryside including a small creek and lake. Sounds like a lot in 4' x 4' but it worked and was a lot of fun. I even had an odd corner that was a perfect fit for a little league baseball diamond (with game in progress).
Ron

Owner and superintendant of the N scale Texas Colorado & Western Railway, a protolanced representaion of the BNSF from Fort Worth, TX through Wichita Falls TX and into Colorado. 

Check out the TC&WRy on at https://www.facebook.com/TCWRy

Check out my MRR How-To YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/c/RonsTrainsNThings

 

  • Member since
    February 2001
  • From: El Dorado Springs, MO
  • 1,519 posts
Posted by n2mopac on Monday, September 22, 2003 10:19 AM
My first layout was a 4' x 4' N scale which I loved and it gave me great detail modeling and operational experience as a beginner. I was able to model a loop with 2 passing sidings, 3 industrial spurs serving 4 industries, a small town and some midwestern countryside including a small creek and lake. Sounds like a lot in 4' x 4' but it worked and was a lot of fun. I even had an odd corner that was a perfect fit for a little league baseball diamond (with game in progress).
Ron

Owner and superintendant of the N scale Texas Colorado & Western Railway, a protolanced representaion of the BNSF from Fort Worth, TX through Wichita Falls TX and into Colorado. 

Check out the TC&WRy on at https://www.facebook.com/TCWRy

Check out my MRR How-To YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/c/RonsTrainsNThings

 

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