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i have a problem please help me

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  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
i have a problem please help me
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 1, 2003 12:02 PM
i am 14 and just got into model rr. I am modeling HO scale. I have atlas snap track laid on cork roadbed. I am wondering how u guys fill in the tiny gaps between the rail joints please reply
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
i have a problem please help me
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 1, 2003 12:02 PM
i am 14 and just got into model rr. I am modeling HO scale. I have atlas snap track laid on cork roadbed. I am wondering how u guys fill in the tiny gaps between the rail joints please reply
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 1, 2003 1:07 PM
How big are the gaps? Are they causing problems? I picture "tiny" as being small enough to not worry about.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 1, 2003 1:07 PM
How big are the gaps? Are they causing problems? I picture "tiny" as being small enough to not worry about.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 1, 2003 1:23 PM
Some folks fill the gaps with styrene filed to match the rail profile, but this is not necessary. A few small unsoldered gaps (with additional electrical feeders) are useful to allow the rails to shift with temperature changes or humidity induced benchwork changes.

If you are worried about the wheel flanges picking the gaps, say from twisting of truck mounted couplers while backing the train, file a small bevel into the rail corner to guide the flange smoothly across the gap.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 1, 2003 1:23 PM
Some folks fill the gaps with styrene filed to match the rail profile, but this is not necessary. A few small unsoldered gaps (with additional electrical feeders) are useful to allow the rails to shift with temperature changes or humidity induced benchwork changes.

If you are worried about the wheel flanges picking the gaps, say from twisting of truck mounted couplers while backing the train, file a small bevel into the rail corner to guide the flange smoothly across the gap.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 1, 2003 2:01 PM
I agree with the replies by billkamery and gchenier. Your first layout is always one where you start to learn. By the time you're ready to move up to flex-track and designing your own layouts, you're still learning. I think that the learning never stops and there are new ways of doing things that come along every day.

Welcome to the hobby, I hope you enjoy many years of modelling railroads.

Best wishes.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 1, 2003 2:01 PM
I agree with the replies by billkamery and gchenier. Your first layout is always one where you start to learn. By the time you're ready to move up to flex-track and designing your own layouts, you're still learning. I think that the learning never stops and there are new ways of doing things that come along every day.

Welcome to the hobby, I hope you enjoy many years of modelling railroads.

Best wishes.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 1, 2003 9:52 PM
thank u for all the great suggestions i'll probaly try filling the gaps with styrene and ca
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 1, 2003 9:52 PM
thank u for all the great suggestions i'll probaly try filling the gaps with styrene and ca
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, August 5, 2003 10:35 AM
It's the rail joints which make the click/clack noise so having tiny gaps is OK unless you keep having derailments. Also, if you are having derailments, check the weight of your freight cars. There is a lot of information on the NMRA web site about recommended weights and track spacing, etc. Good luck and keep asking questions.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, August 5, 2003 10:35 AM
It's the rail joints which make the click/clack noise so having tiny gaps is OK unless you keep having derailments. Also, if you are having derailments, check the weight of your freight cars. There is a lot of information on the NMRA web site about recommended weights and track spacing, etc. Good luck and keep asking questions.
  • Member since
    September 2002
  • 7,407 posts
Posted by ndbprr on Tuesday, August 5, 2003 2:22 PM
if you have used snap track you may not have the track down correctly. If one side is has the ends of the rails touching on both pieces of track and the other side of the same joint does not you don't have your track alligned and it will cause derailments. You might need to relay your track to correct the problem.
  • Member since
    September 2002
  • 7,407 posts
Posted by ndbprr on Tuesday, August 5, 2003 2:22 PM
if you have used snap track you may not have the track down correctly. If one side is has the ends of the rails touching on both pieces of track and the other side of the same joint does not you don't have your track alligned and it will cause derailments. You might need to relay your track to correct the problem.

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