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What adhesive to use to attach clear plastic to metal castings?

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What adhesive to use to attach clear plastic to metal castings?
Posted by Pruitt on Sunday, April 11, 2021 10:36 PM

I'm building a very old structure kit that has metal door and window castings.

I'm uncertain what adhesive to use to attach the clear acetate "glazing" to the back of the windows. I've heard that the fumes from CA will fog the acetate, so I don't want to use that.

Obviously plastic cement won't work, since the castings are metal. But I'm not sure what will.

Any suggestions? 

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Posted by hon30critter on Sunday, April 11, 2021 11:44 PM

Hi Mark,

You have heard correctly. CA will fog clear surfaces. I learned that the hard way!

I would suggest that you try using 'canopy cement'. It is designed specifically for this purpose. It dries clear and stays a bit flexible. RC airplane modelers have used it for years to attach window glazing.

This is what I use:

https://www.hobbytown.com/pacer-technology-formula-560-canopy-glue-paapt56/p17369

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

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Posted by doctorwayne on Monday, April 12, 2021 3:02 AM

I've had good results using Weldbond...it claims on the container to "bond almost anything to anything".

I originally bought it in desperation when a rubber cone-shaped fitting on the hood of my pick-up (meant to keep a bug deflector on the front of the hood from vibrating at speed) came off when I was washing the truck. 
The spot where it belonged (there were several across the hood) was plain to see, so I put a small amount on the rubber and pressed it into place. 
The next day it seemed pretty solid, so I went for a spin on the highway, and was surprised that it didn't come loose.
Four years later, when I sold that truck, that little thing was still stuck solid right where it belonged - that on a vehicle which was never garaged.

I've also used it on my layout to affix plastic ties in-place on cork, as headblocks for switchstands.  It looks like white glue, but dries clear.  Flipping Caboose Industries groundthrows mounted on them never budged a one.

Wayne

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Posted by gmpullman on Monday, April 12, 2021 4:42 AM

I like to use various "PVA" glues, Weldbond and Formula 560 that Wayne and Dave mention are good ones.

One of my main uses is to cement the glazing into brass passenger car models. Sometimes I'll use the needle applicator found on the Faller Expert Laser glue, which is a thinner PVA.

My method is to tack the acetate in place using Scotch tape or handy little glue dots then a tiny drop of the canopy cement applied at the very edge of the acetate will fill the edges by capillary action.

Use it sparingly if you choose the thinner stuff. The Weldbond can be dabbed at the edges and is thick enough it will not creep but it may not self-level, either.

Practice before you try it on the good model..

http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2013/05/a-few-words-in-praise-of-canopy-glue.html

I mentioned in an earlier thread about PVA that I'll use canopy cement/PVA for attaching small detail parts and that idea didn't go over well with some of the respondents here but I still use it with success for attaching etched stainless parts, grab irons and little people feet to the terrain.

Good Luck, Ed

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Monday, April 12, 2021 8:38 AM

Pruitt
Obviously plastic cement won't work, since the castings are metal. But I'm not sure what will. Any suggestions? 

A fellow forum user suggested GS-Hypo cement for me, and it works very well. I have not used it on metal, but I think it would work.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by Lastspikemike on Monday, April 12, 2021 8:39 AM

Micro scale Kristal Klear.

It appears to be a form of PVA and dries crystal clear.

I've also used clear silicone marine grade caulk to affix window plastic to brass cars. If you spill over a little bit you can scrape off the excess with a toothpick.

Silicone doesn't adhere as strongly as the glue does. 

Alyth Yard

Canada

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Posted by Pruitt on Monday, April 12, 2021 5:31 PM

Thanks folks! I'll see if I can find any of those at the train show this weekend.

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Posted by BigDaddy on Monday, April 12, 2021 5:56 PM

Testors has a "Clear Parts Cement" that also dries clear.

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

Shenandoah Valley

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Posted by hon30critter on Monday, April 12, 2021 7:57 PM

gmpullman
I mentioned in an earlier thread about PVA that I'll use canopy cement/PVA for attaching small detail parts and that idea didn't go over well with some of the respondents here but I still use it with success for attaching etched stainless parts, grab irons and little people feet to the terrain.

Rapido recommends using PVA (white glue) for re-attaching detail parts. If Ed and Jason both say it works, then it works!

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

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Posted by tstage on Monday, April 12, 2021 8:55 PM

BigDaddy
Testors has a "Clear Parts Cement" that also dries clear.

I'll second Henry suggestion of the Testors Clear Parts Cement & Window Maker.  I've used it to affix SMD LEDs inside brass headlights and it holds very well and dries clear.

Tom

https://tstage9.wixsite.com/nyc-modeling

Time...It marches on...without ever turning around to see if anyone is even keeping in step.

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Posted by gmpullman on Monday, April 12, 2021 9:02 PM

hon30critter
Rapido recommends using PVA (white glue) for re-attaching detail parts. If Ed and Jason both say it works, then it works!

I still use ACC superglue in certain applications. I've been using several of the different white glue types more often lately, even for attaching grab irons and such.

I like the fact that I can use a little water on a Q-tip or toothpick to clean up any excess glue. Most of the newer PVAs stay pliable after they set which gives a certian degree of resilliancy.

The thinner ones such as the Faller Expert Laser have a nice capillary action that flows along a joint line much like the Tenax or any of the thinner styrene cements.

This is the thread where the OP asked about building a laser-cut kit and the conversation gravitated to cements:

http://cs.trains.com/mrr/f/88/t/278370.aspx?page=1

I like to use the GS Hypo cement for certain tasks, too, but be careful because it tends to be "stringy" and if you use it for glazing you might get threads on the glass. The heat from your fingers will cause the glue to ooze out of the tube so be ready to stick the pin back in the nozzle quickly!

There are probably two-dozen various cements I use in the course of a construction project. Each one has properties that I require for the particular task at hand. No "one-size-fits-all" here.

Cheers, Ed

 

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Posted by zstripe on Wednesday, April 14, 2021 7:30 AM

SeeYou190

 

 
Pruitt
Obviously plastic cement won't work, since the castings are metal. But I'm not sure what will. Any suggestions? 

 

A fellow forum user suggested GS-Hypo cement for me, and it works very well. I have not used it on metal, but I think it would work.

-Kevin

 

I have been using the above for more than 20yrs. especially in all My truck builds for winshields and other parts. Used on white metal, Pewter castings, Plastic, Resin kits. Not one problem on mine or the ones I have built for others. I also use it on structures with real glass windows with perfect results. Be aware though, it has a 1/2 hour set time.

Another one I also use is Loctite GO-2 Gel great for Accetal plastic's(slippery). It has a slight flex to it when cured. It is Not a CA.

https://www.loctiteproducts.com/en/products/fix/general-purpose/go2_gel.html

Take Care! Smile, Wink & Grin

Frank

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Posted by Pruitt on Wednesday, April 14, 2021 6:50 PM

I found the "Testors Clear Parts Cement" at the local Hobby Lobby. Couldn't find any of the others, so I'll give it a go.

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