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Lionel's switcher questions.

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  • Member since
    April 2009
  • 87 posts
Lionel's switcher questions.
Posted by Lionel 773 hudson on Friday, September 4, 2009 6:47 PM

  I know aboult the sout sets haveins problms but did the sets with 0-4-0 switchers have the same.  I have the last prewar catlog and it has a few 0-4-0 sets in it priced as high as some of the 2-4-2 sets did this carry over to the postwar era as the 2-4-2's did, and did the 0-6-0's go from 1941 to 1980's the last one lionel made in their "toy" (pre & postwar) was the B-6 I think.  I just wainted to know because I am going to a BIG flee market Sunday and one might pop up.  The new 0-8-0's Lionel is making haw are those mach up to the 0-6 and 4-0's made in the past?  Thanks!

Tags: Lionel
Speling? Optional. Ricky.L
  • Member since
    January 2009
  • 1,894 posts
Posted by 8ntruck on Friday, September 4, 2009 10:46 PM

I've got a Lionel postwar #1615 0-4-0 switcher.  Nice little locomotive.  3 position e-unit, pulls well, no particular problems with the 027 and 60" Fastrack switches on my layout.

I've never had a Scout locomotive, so I cannot really make a good comparison.

Dub
  • Member since
    July 2008
  • From: Seacoast, New Hampshire
  • 224 posts
Posted by Dub on Saturday, September 5, 2009 7:24 AM

 The only thing the Scouts have in common with the switchers is that they have four drive wheels. The Scout motor has a plastic  engine casing. Using that as a guide you should be happy. As I said before a service manual is a great reference. The 1615 is  a nice engine. Probably the most desirable in steam with  four drive wheels  in the 50's. I know earlier switchers were made. I haven't researched them but the price will distinguish them from the Scouts.

Good Hunting 

 

 

 

Bob
  • Member since
    September 2022
  • 1 posts
Posted by richardvalstewart on Tuesday, September 13, 2022 12:45 PM

Dub

 The only thing the Scouts have in common with the switchers is that they have four drive wheels. The Scout motor has a plastic  engine casing. Using that as a guide you should be happy. As I said before a service manual is a great reference. The 1615 is  a nice engine. Probably the most desirable in steam with  four drive wheels  in the 50's. I know earlier switchers were made. I haven't researched them but the price will distinguish them from the Scouts.

Good Hunting 

A couple of years ago, I was looking for a good postwar steam switcher and came across the 1615 Scout.  It is all metal with no traction tires and runs extremely well.  The main reason why I wanted this loco was the fact it has operating couplers both front and rear.  In addition, these were magnetic couplers and not the coil type, so it works on all the different types of accessory/uncoupler track sections.  The only issue I have had with this engine and it was easily fixed, was the rear pickup roller was not always conducting power to the roller axle.  A good cleaning with some contact cleaner fixed that issue right up.  A few drops of 3in1 oil in various places keep this little engine in top condition and it can now shuffle cars about between the industries with no problems.

 

 

 

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