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Reverse curves and tender derailment

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  • Member since
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Reverse curves and tender derailment
Posted by stuartmit on Monday, May 9, 2022 11:37 AM

Because of a relatively short length of space on my layout, I had to install two reverse curves out of an 022 switch in order to move my track alignment over about 3 inches so that there would be enough straight run ahead of two parallel bridges So locomotives entering the bridge will clear the girder sides. The bridges are about 33 inches long, and on the other side of them are relatively broad curves which are parallel, and so the outer curve cannot be reduced in radius to free up some space. So the only solution to the space problem are these two reverse curves to adjust track position. 

 

I am well aware that reverse curves are really undesirable, but you do see them in some track plans. A problem I am having with steam locomotives and tenders is that the tender draw bar connection seems to be tight on every one of four or five different tenders that I have, and when the locomotives swings back to an alignment parallel to the original, but over somewhat from the original alignment, the tender drawbar does not easily return to being centered and the result is the tender is pulled off the track and tips over to that side.  I get the same thing with several different tenders, and several different locomotives. What is common to all the situations is that in all cases the tender draw bar connection seems to have more friction than the locomotive connection does. So I know that the tenders are  the problem yet I cannot seem to create lower friction by the use of any lubricant In an effort to ease the re-centering movement of the tender draw bar.. 

any suggestions? 

  • Member since
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  • From: Henrico, VA
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Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, May 9, 2022 4:09 PM

I'm guessing these are postwars?  Or MPC era?

One thing I can think of is to remove the truck with the drawbar and polish the mating surfaces between the tender frame and the top of the drawbar, basically slick 'em up a bit to reduce the friction. 

Another thing, if the derailing is only happening when the tender has a load on it, that is a train of cars, try ballasting the tender to increase its weight.  I've done that with whistle-less or otherwise lightweight tenders that had a problem holding the rails on curves with a load on them. 

 

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Posted by stuartmit on Monday, May 9, 2022 4:30 PM

your last comment was absolutely reasonable and I completely follow, but 3 of the tenders are the metal body tenders. I believe their numbers are 2224, and perhaps 2426--but no question they are metal bodied, so heavy.  

what would I use on a Dremel to polish them?

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Posted by pennytrains on Monday, May 9, 2022 6:09 PM

A carbon steel brush wheel has always been my weapon of choice.  (The stainless steel brushes lose their filaments too easily.) Grease should help too.

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

  • Member since
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  • From: Henrico, VA
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Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, May 9, 2022 8:44 PM

pennytrains

A carbon steel brush wheel has always been my weapon of choice.  (The stainless steel brushes lose their filaments too easily.) Grease should help too.

 

Not a bad start.  I was thinking of a brass circular brush on a Dremel, then a fiber wheel with polishing compound.  Something like jeweler's rouge, but maybe not as fine.  I'd work on the drawbar plate before you mess with the tender frame.

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Posted by stuartmit on Tuesday, June 7, 2022 6:59 AM

Problem solved, differently

the leading switch is #022.  I have inquired here about cutting them down to allow closer spacing of parallel tracks. I have had a little success, but barely acceptable.  I have found it difficult to maintain firm Mounting of the very short rail remaining after cutting switches at about the third tie, which removea about 15deg of arc.  Further, completely unsuccessful with creation of new space under the rails to receive track pins. 
as a result, I mount the mating track "right there" as close as possible but with a small gap to protext the non derail feature. When you look at it, This looks like hell when  it catches yr eye, but I try not to look to often. 

by shortening the curved leg I saved enough length of track to allow adequate straight track to allow the tender loco connection to return to its normal arrangement.

it works fine, but I wish I could do a better job getting the Bakelite out to allow pin placement and anchoring the old rail. 

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  • 378 posts
Posted by stuartmit on Tuesday, June 7, 2022 7:21 AM

Still don't have any clue as to how to make the locomotive tender connection less stiff.

Questions made previously seem to me, with my skills, as not too promising!

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Posted by dsmith on Friday, June 10, 2022 8:57 AM

You might also try making the drawbar longer.  Even a 1/4 inch longer might solve the tight drawbar problem in the S curve.

 

  David from Dearborn  

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