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SUNDAY PUZZLE FUN 5-2-21 OF FRONTIERSMEN, PIONEERS & GENERALS 1

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  • Member since
    July 2020
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SUNDAY PUZZLE FUN 5-2-21 OF FRONTIERSMEN, PIONEERS & GENERALS 1
Posted by pennytrains on Saturday, May 1, 2021 5:09 PM

OF FRONTIERSMEN, PIONEERS AND GENERALS 1
61 WORDS

BEWARE BACKWARDS ANSWERS

  1. 1959 was a remarkable year.  All three big American (_ _ _) train manufacturers decided to catalog a (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) of the same type; the 4-4-0 (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _).  Let’s look at these (_ _ _ _ _)-American style locos and the sets they came in.
  2. Why not begin with the (_ _ _ _) No. 1 “(_ _ . _ _ _ _ _ _)” which was all (_ _ _ _ _) except for the gold (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) and trim.  This “Old-Style (_ _ _ _ - _ _ _ _ _ _)”, as the Sears catalog described it, was lettered “1st (_ _ _ _) St. P. & P. R. R.” and was equipped with a smoke unit and deluxe (_ _ _ _ _ _) on it’s tender and accompanying cars.
  3. Supplied with the No. 1 (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) and No. 3 “regular” tin (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) passenger cars, Sears sold set No. 79N09622 for $18.77 under the (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) brand name in 1959.  The next year the price was lowered to $12.89, but now track and (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) were no longer included as this set was now described as an “Ideal (_ _ _ _ _) train for your own track layout.”
  4. But wait!  We can’t overlook the TP-3000 announced in 1952!  Not a Lionel, (_ _ _ _ _ _ _), or even a Marx loco, this American was manufactured by (_ _ _ _ _ _) Industries.  Unlike the 1959 locos described by this puzzle, the TP-3000 featured a sheet-metal (_ _ _ _ _ _), cast-brass (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) and numerous high quality (_ _ _ - _ _ _ _) and (_ _ _ _ _ _) brass parts where the other three manufacturers used (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) on their “(_ _ _ _ - _ _ _ _ _ _)”.
  5. Not actually mass-produced until the next year, the (_ _ _ _ _) and red (_ _ _ _ _ _ _)-stacked 4-4-0 arrived in modeler’s hands in 1953.  In 1954 baggage and (_ _ _ _ _) cars and 19th (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) freight cars arrived to fill out the (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) Express and (_ _ _ _) Freight sets being cataloged for just a few brief years.
  6. Jumping back to 1959, green was also the primary color American (_ _ _ _ _) chose for it’s 50th (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) No. (210)88 (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) loco cab and tender.  Dominating both the (_ _ _ _ _) and the center spread of the catalog, the No. 20550 (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) set included a pair of No. (247)20 (_ _ _ _ - _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) coaches, 12 sections of S gauge track and a 40 watt transformer.
  7. The (_ _ _ _ _ _) of the rare versions of this set are the ones that were (_ _ _ _ _) handed out during Flyer’s (_ _ _ _ _ _) anniversary year.  Possibly distributed at the New York (_ _ _ - _ _ _ _), the (_ _ _ _ _ _) is marked inside the fuel bunker “One of the (_ _ _ _ _ - _ _ _ _ -)” and the set boxes bore a special gold (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) seal with the same words.
  8. The No. (247)20 coaches in these prized sets also lack the American Flyer (_ _ _ _ _) lettering of the common F. Y. & P. R. R. car.  “Cutting out a ‘ticket’ on the side of a (_ _ _ _) Cereals package,” wrote Ted Hamler in the July 2001 CTT, “entitled a consumer to receive a (_ _ _ _) no. (247)30 American Flyer (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) Express Car with the (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) of a no. 20550 anniversary set.”
  9. The No. (247)30 express car “could also be obtained by purchasing a 20550 at an authorized (_ _ _ _ _ _) and removing the blue and white (_ _ _ _ _ _) from the end of the (247)30 box.”  First 50 express cars were also produced and like the No. (247)20 coaches, they lack the A.F.L. lettering and have their round (_ _ _ _ _) labels to the right of the doors instead of the left.
  10. Possibly more prized than the Fist 50 sets are the 225 Franklin locos mounted on (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) bases.  According to “Maury (_ _ _ _ _), who oversaw production of the American Flyer line,” as stated in the article, “the company assembled 25 with (_ _ _ _ _ _) and another 200 without them.”
  11. “Preproduction” versions of the No. (210)88 loco also exist with (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) painted boilers and tender tops.  Like the First 50 models, the (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) were installed with cast-metal (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) rather then the (_ _ _ _ _ _ - _ _ _ _) used on regular production locos.
  12. Don’t forget about the (247)40 (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) car produced to match the (247)20 and (247)30 cars, or the Nos. (240)55 (_ _ _ _) (_ _ _ _) Line boxcar and (245)65 flatcar with (_ _ _ _ _ _) included in (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) sets.  But what does “F. Y. & P.” stand for?  Seriously, I have no idea.

    To be continued…

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

  • Member since
    July 2020
  • 406 posts
Posted by pennytrains on Saturday, May 8, 2021 5:55 PM

OF FRONTIERSMEN, PIONEERS AND GENERALS 1
61 WORDS

BEWARE BACKWARDS ANSWERS

  1. 1959 was a remarkable year.  All three big American (TOY) train manufacturers decided to catalog a (LOCOMOTIVE) of the same type; the 4-4-0 (AMERICAN).  Let’s look at these (EARLY)-American style locos and the sets they came in.
  2. Why not begin with the (MARX) No. 1 “(WM . CROOKS)” which was all (BLACK) except for the gold (LETTERING) and trim.  This “Old-Style (WOOD - BURNER)”, as the Sears catalog described it, was lettered “1st (DIVN) St. P. & P. R. R.” and was equipped with a smoke unit and deluxe (TRUCKS) on it’s tender and accompanying cars.
  3. Supplied with the No. 1 (BAGGAGE) and No. 3 “regular” tin (LITHOGRAPHED) passenger cars, Sears sold set No. 79N09622 for $18.77 under the (ALLSTATE) brand name in 1959.  The next year the price was lowered to $12.89, but now track and (TRANSFORMER)     were no longer included as this set was now described as an “Ideal (EXTRA) train for your own track layout.”
  4. But wait!  We can’t overlook the TP-3000 announced in 1952!  Not a Lionel, (GILBERT), or even a Marx loco, this American was manufactured by (THOMAS) Industries.  Unlike the 1959 locos described by this puzzle, the TP-3000 featured a sheet-metal (BOILER), cast-brass (CYLINDERS) and numerous high quality (DIE - CAST) and (TURNED) brass parts where the other three manufacturers used (PLASTICS) on their “(IRON - HORSES)”.
  5. Not actually mass-produced until the next year, the (GREEN) and red (BALLOON)-stacked 4-4-0 arrived in modeler’s hands in 1953.  In 1954 baggage and (COACH) cars and 19th (CENTURY) freight cars arrived to fill out the (SHAWNEE) Express and (FAST) Freight sets being cataloged for just a few brief years.
  6. Jumping back to 1959, green was also the primary color American (FLYER) chose for it’s 50th (ANNIVERSARY) No. (210)88 (FRANKLIN) loco cab and tender.  Dominating both the (COVER) and the center spread of the catalog, the No. 20550 (FRONTIERSMAN) set included a pair of No. (247)20 (OPEN - PLATFORM) coaches, 12 sections of S gauge track and a 40 watt transformer.
  7. The (RAREST) of the rare versions of this set are the ones that were (GIFTS) handed out during Flyer’s (GOLDEN) anniversary year.  Possibly distributed at the New York (TOY - FAIR), the (TENDER) is marked inside the fuel bunker “One of the (FIRST - FIFTY)” and the set boxes bore a special gold (STARBURST) seal with the same words.
  8. The No. (247)20 coaches in these prized sets also lack the American Flyer (LINES) lettering of the common F. Y. & P. R. R. car.  “Cutting out a ‘ticket’ on the side of a (POST) Cereals package,” wrote Ted Hamler in the July 2001 CTT, “entitled a consumer to receive a (FREE) no. (247)30 American Flyer (OVERLAND) Express Car with the (PURCHASE) of a no. 20550 anniversary set.”
  9. The No. (247)30 express car “could also be obtained by purchasing a 20550 at an authorized (DEALER) and removing the blue and white (COUPON) from the end of the (247)30 box.”  First 50 express cars were also produced and like the No. (247)20 coaches, they lack the A.F.L. lettering and have their round (PAPER) labels to the right of the doors instead of the left.
  10. Possibly more prized than the Fist 50 sets are the 225 Franklin locos mounted on (DISPLAY) bases.  According to “Maury (ROMER), who oversaw production of the American Flyer line,” as stated in the article, “the company assembled 25 with (MOTORS) and another 200 without them.”
  11. “Preproduction” versions of the No. (210)88 loco also exist with (CHARCOAL) painted boilers and tender tops.  Like the First 50 models, the (HANDRAILS) were installed with cast-metal (STANCHIONS) rather then the (COTTER - PINS) used on regular production locos.
  12. Don’t forget about the (247)40 (COMBINE) car produced to match the (247)20 and (247)30 cars, or the Nos. (240)55 (GOLD) (BELT) Line boxcar and (245)65 flatcar with (CANNON) included in (UNCATALOGED) sets.  But what does “F. Y. & P.” stand for?  Seriously, I have no idea.

    To be continued…

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

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