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Please help with a car design from the late '40s

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Posted by rcdrye on Thursday, January 26, 2023 3:46 PM

B&M + NH trains also included the Day White Mountains and the Overnighter.  The DWM carried a parlor to White River Jct.  and through coaches to Berlin NH.  The Overnighter carried a Pullman to Woodsville NH.

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, January 26, 2023 2:24 PM

But, come to think of it, I don't think the American Flyers trally had any window-sash, as such.  Just glass set with ruibber or neoprene gaskets in the window-holes in the walls.  No openabvle windows.

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, January 25, 2023 8:57 AM

The early and middle 1950's saw about f0our NYC - Springfielkd trains each way, New Haven equipment (one possibly some PRR, swiched in and out of a Boston - Washington at New Haven); the overnight Washington - Montreal, PRR. New Haven, Boston and Maine, and Canadian Nationsl (in Central Vermont service) equipment, with occasional use of Grand Trunk equipment substituted; one NYC - Mointreal, ("Ambassdador"), New Haven, B&M, CN; and two NYC - Boston - via Springfield, New Haven American Flyers and New York Central air0-conditioned heavyweights.

That is all from memory.  Do check on this.

And by all means check on aluminum vs. white.  The cars at the museun can answer vthat question.

 

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Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, January 25, 2023 8:41 AM

As noted, these were some of the most iconic cars in railroad service.  The paired-window Osgood-Bradley lightweight coaches were, as noted, often referred to as 'American Flyer" cars (and you could make some pretty good scale cars out of two of those shells selectively cut and pasted...)

They survived at least into the late '70s or early '80s in commuter service into South Station in Boston, and I suspect there are many, many pictures of them in that service.  You should go photograph the preserved examples for details -- for example, many of these cars rolled on Fafnir roller bearings and the axlebox covers faithfully announced this.

I thought the window trim was aluminum, not white -- but Mr. Klepper was there, and I wasn't.

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, January 25, 2023 7:38 AM

1952 saw the end of New Haven regular passenger service behind steam.

Alco diesels of the types you mentioned, yes, until the FL-9s arrived.

MIddle of Connecticut means New Haven, with B&M north of Springfield, MA for the through trains.

THe RR Museum of New England has two ex-New Haven "American Flyer" coaches.  They are at Thomaston, Connecticut.

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Posted by rcdrye on Wednesday, January 25, 2023 7:12 AM

Through trains up the Connecticut River would have a mix of "American Flyer" cars of New Haven and Boston & Maine ownership, and some older heavyweights.  B&M used a mix of steam and EMD F2s and F3s in 1950 on Conn River trains, with an occasional E7.  New Haven could have had an RS3, a PA, or a DL109 Alco locomotive, or one of the New Haven's light pacifics, between New Haven and Springfield.

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, January 25, 2023 5:49 AM

1.  Correcting my error.  The early 1950s were befolre thed FL-9s arfrived, and Electrics arrived.  Electric of EP-2, EP-3, and EP-4 classes hasndled vthe trains GCT (NYC) - New Haven, and Alco diesels there to Springfield.  Same "American Flyer" coaches, however.   My memory of the color (sides, ends and roof dark grey) added.

 

2.  In looking to post photos cuseful to yolu, none seemjewd quite crigfht.  Untilo I thought of tghe two below, actually bon the Boston and Maine at North AStrationh, Boston, with Amrtican Flyer coaches of thec exact sam e type, jhyust different main collor, but otherwise iudentical, even to the puyre white windkow trim.  MY suggectuion is thast tghe husdband be shown as have exited frirst, standing to gthe right of the door, with his arm outstretched helpinbg his wife to to follow.

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, January 25, 2023 3:28 AM

The tran was probably a NYCity Grand Central Terminal - Springfield train, which they rode to Hartford.  Its consist certasinly included the Pullman-built well-known "American Flyer" (from the HO asnd S-gauge models) pre-WWII coaches.  If they remember traveling first class, something else may apply.

Wilapedia may have the images under New Haven Railroad passenger equipment, but server querks opermitting, I'll follow this with some of my own images.  A single FL-9 was typical power for Springfield trains at the time, with no engine chasnge at New Haven.

Proof-read and corrected twice.  Wonder if a third time will be necessary?

 

 

 

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Posted by rcdrye on Tuesday, January 24, 2023 9:29 AM

Daytime trip?  And where in NH? - it makes a difference.

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Please help with a car design from the late '40s
Posted by NickEJ on Monday, January 23, 2023 4:47 PM

Hi--I'm hoping for some help with an out-of-the ordinary problem. I'm an illustrator and I've been commissioned to paint a double portrait of a couple who met on a train from Grand Central in NYC to New Hampshire in the Summer of 1948. It was a cute meeting: he was traveling up to play music in the hotels in central NH with his jazz trio, and she was traveling up to work as a waitress in a seasonal restaurant. He had bought an extra ticket for his upright bass, since he didn't trust the luggage handlers. It turns out that it was the only free seat on the train, so she asked if she could share it. They're still married seventy years later, and their son has asked me to do the painting. I've spoken with the couple and while they remember everything about each other, they don't remember much about the railway car. Not surprising, I suppose, but it leaves me at a little bit of a loss as to how to depict it. Obviously it doesn't need to be the exact car, but a likely carriage for that line at that time would be very helpful. I'm going to make a digital 3D model of the car to help me with the composition, so photos and design documents would be VERY helpful. 

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