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Fateful Trip , passengers of Destiny.

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Posted by seppburgh2 on Friday, June 30, 2023 10:07 PM

It has been said the picture of good Father in the barber chair taking his picture was the very first selfee. 

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Posted by Overmod on Saturday, July 1, 2023 9:04 AM

I will have to check, but I think American Milemaster was built with aluminum truck frames.  They were quickly replaced and, as with front-feed coal stokers, swept as quickly and mercifully from popular railroad history as possible.

Guided by some of the research into duralumins in the WWI era,  PRR made and tested a set of aluminum side rods (!) on an I1s Decapod (!!)  I have only ever seen pictures of these under test with a great many strain gages across the web of the main.  Let's say I'm not terribly surprised this experiment 'failed to thrive'...

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Wednesday, July 26, 2023 10:55 AM

Well this is surprising, someone's come up with a traditional sea chantey concerning the Ocean Gate sub disaster.

I don't know what to think about it.  What does everyone else think?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v11-ID5vq-k

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Posted by zugmann on Wednesday, July 26, 2023 11:01 AM

Flintlock76
I don't know what to think about it.  What does everyone else think?

I couldn't make it past one verse.  Hearing the deep breaths on the microphone before each line is horrible.   I don't think the guy has the pipes for it. 

  

The opinions expressed here represent my own and not those of my employer, any other railroad, company, or person.

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Posted by rcdrye on Thursday, July 27, 2023 11:11 AM

Overmod
I will have to check, but I think American Milemaster was built with aluminum truck frames.  They were quickly replaced and, as with front-feed coal stokers, swept as quickly and mercifully from popular railroad history as possible.

American Milemaster and duplicate Muskingum River were built with GSC steel trucks.  The 1933 "George M Pullman" was definitely built with four wheel aluminum trucks, replaced by six wheel steel trucks.

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Posted by pennytrains on Friday, July 28, 2023 6:49 PM

Seems a tad mean spirited to me.  It has a classic feel but it's right up there with the ballad of Casey Jones and Be British as far as being a popular tune a century after the event is concerned.  They ain't no Gordon Lightfoot. Wink

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

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Posted by daveklepper on Saturday, September 23, 2023 2:19 PM

Going back to the Titanic, a start-up Israeli company is now astarting to manufacture a wrist bracelet that might have saved  lives in both the Titanic and Titan tragedies.

The “NeoMare” company has developed an armband with an emergency mechanism, which includes a floatation balloon that initiates when there is a danger of drowning.

And regarding water displacement, for those that miss a deleted thread, if you wear this bracelet, possibly you are zssured of continurd lifem regardless of swimming skills or depth of water, should you attemp  to walk on water.

And the device may be standard for ocean ships and gtransp-ocean air travel.

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Posted by MidlandMike on Saturday, September 23, 2023 10:09 PM

The device might help someone to float, but they must be rescued before hypothermia sets in.  I doubt it would have helped most Titanic victims.

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, September 24, 2023 3:21 AM

Maybe if one had four, one on each limb (wrists and ankles), one could walk on water?

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Sunday, September 24, 2023 10:08 AM

daveklepper

Maybe if one had four, one on each limb (wrists and ankles), one could walk on water?

 
BLASPHEMY!
The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by timz on Monday, September 25, 2023 10:14 AM

Wonder how easy it would be to avoid ending up with your wrists and ankles on the surface and the rest of you beneath them.

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, September 27, 2023 3:11 AM

CS:  Apologies.  Respect your religious feelings.

Not about to try the experiment.

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Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, September 27, 2023 9:42 AM

In order to work to avoid water hypothermia, the four bracelets would have to collectively displace more than the mass of the person concerned.  That would make them, to put it lightly, unwieldy, and moreover it would be highly metastable, so a 'user' would have to constantly balance to keep themselves above water -- with their hands and feet in 29-degree constant immersion.  (Of course they would have likely become wholly drenched jumping from the ship, so are now exposed to ambient air with a huge wetted surface area -- not likely to avoid hypothermia at least to the extent of making them unable to keep up the balancing act.

Recovery into a boat would be difficult with all the bulky floats tightly wrapped to wrists and ankles.

The premise of the Israeli invention is not to 'float' people above the water, but to keep them with their heads upright with just enough buoyancy to ensure their noses and mouths remain above water.  If they are unconscious the solution won't help them much, because their arms will float over their heads if they swallow or inhale even a small amount of water or their clothes become waterlogged.

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, October 1, 2023 8:25 AM

That makes sense,  Thanks.

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