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Peter Witt streetcars that are not PCCs

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, October 24, 2021 11:00 AM

Eric Oszustowicz indicates the 1st photo is at Franklin (with the tracks, and one block south of Crown Street.

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, October 24, 2021 10:37 PM

And the second is actually on Nostrand Avenue, just north of a the single-switch connection to the single-track Holy Cross Cemetary Shuttle line, the car will rubn through a crossover and head to the carhouse.

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, October 25, 2021 9:47 AM

further corrections by fellow ERA members:

 
Attachments3:05 PM (2 hours ago)
 
 
The Holy Cross Cemetary car returning to thr Carhouse is at Rockaway & Hegeman,
near the Carhouse.
The car on the Lorimer Lineis at Franklin and Montgomery, one block north of Franklin
and Crown, and the northeast corner of Prospect Park.

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, November 29, 2021 7:34 AM

Russ Jackson sent this pre-WWII photo that was in Bill Madden's collection at 39th styreet near 2nd Avenue.  The South Brooklyn thread at Trains has a an SB freight at this location, also pre-WWII and  from Russ.  This streetcar is probably on the Church Avenue Line.  

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, December 7, 2021 1:41 AM
From WikipediaL

Fort Greene is a neighborhood in the northwestern part of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. The neighborhood is bounded by Flushing Avenue and the Brooklyn Navy Yard to the north, Flatbush Avenue Extension and Downtown Brooklyn to the west, Atlantic Avenue and Prospect Heights to the south, and Vanderbilt Avenue and Clinton Hill to the east. The Fort Greene Historic District is listed on the New York State Registry and on the National Register of Historic Places, and is a New York City designated historic district.

The neighborhood is named after an American Revolutionary War era fort that was built in 1776 under the supervision of General Nathanael Greene of Rhode Island.[4] General Greene aided General George Washington during the Battle of Long Island in 1776. Fort Greene Park, originally called "Washington Park" is Brooklyn's first. In 1864, Fort Greene Park was redesigned by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux; the park notably includes the Prison Ship Martyrs' Monument and crypt, which honors some 11,500 patriots who died aboard British prison ships during the American Revolution.

Fort Greene contains many examples of mid-19th century Italianate and Eastlake architecture, most of which is well preserved. It is known for its many tree-lined streets and elegant low-rise housing. Fort Greene is also home to the Williamsburgh Savings Bank Tower, which, for over 80 years, was the tallest building in Brooklyn.[5] The neighborhood is close to the Atlantic Terminal station of the Long Island Rail Road and has access to many New York City Subway services.

On DeKalb Avenue, looking SE toward Fort Greene Park:

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
   
   
   
   
   
 
   
 
   
   
 
   
   
   
   
   
 
   
   
   
   
   

 

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, March 13, 2022 8:07 AM

Double-end Peter Witt is on the Coney Iskland - Bay Ridge Line  on 86th St., looking east on 86th St. toward New trecht Avenue, with the West End line above.   The Loews Theater is Still there, no longer a movie theater.

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, June 15, 2022 1:59 PM

the 8590's were originally regular one-man doeble-end steel safety cars with the Peter Witt door arrangement like all other 8000=series Brooklym streetcars.

But in the late 1920's they received an added feature which shifted them to single-end operating lines.  Qestion One:  What was this feature?

Here the car is at a stub-end gterminal.  The feature was not required on a fan-trip, ao tasking a  car normally assigned to lines with loops at both ends to lines requiring double-end cars was a drawer for this fan-trip.

Where is this photo location?

The line did once have a loop here.  Who was respomsible for the lkoop's removal an d greater inconvenirnce to people using the facility that might wish to arrive or leave by streetcar?

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Posted by daveklepper on Saturday, June 25, 2022 3:19 PM

The photo is on the 92nd Street, Queens, bridge over the Grand Central Parkway, the stub-end  terminal of the Grand Avenue Line, after Mayor LaGuardia forced the streetcars off the convenient loop they had in front of the "New York Municipasl Airport" (later LaGuuardia) Main Building.  The 8500s, unlike 8000 - 8499, had a turnstyle at one end for rapid loadind with single-end operation, so only a fan-trip saw them on lines requiring double enders.  (You can see a more modern turnstyle in the restored PCC 1001 af Shore Line Trolley Museun.)   All cars for single-end operation in Brooklyn received turnstyles.

Another photo on the Grand Avenue line from the fan trip that used two cars, 8532 in the post-WWII green-and-silver exterior, and 8525 in the pre-WWII maroon-and-cream.

Then to the Graham Avenue line, the Manhattan Avenue - Vernon Avene bridge to L. I. City, the loop there, and a waterfront view of the Eastern Distrct Terminal's LI City yard with the Manhattan skyline behind iL

 

 

 

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, July 1, 2022 9:29 AM

Showing the relationshipo of  the streetcar loop  to the waterfront.  The 4100 converted to single-end -with turnstyle was substituting for the usual 6000 single-end Peter Witt on the Crosstiown Line, bout 8000s were used as frequebntly as 6000s on the Grahaqm Line to Williamsburg Plaza.

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, September 4, 2022 4:19 PM

The 5000s werwe the first steel Brooklyn streetcars. after 3557, the prototype, center entrance photo provided by Nate Gerstein.  Originally, they were center-door entrance-and-exit, two-man cars, but were made into double-end Peter Witts by installing doors into slised-off right corners.  The 5100s (originaly 6000s) were sinilar doublr-end trailees, but wpth deck-roofs matching the motor cars that hauked them.  Half of this fleet, 50 cars, were converted to singke-end Peter Wiits,

 

 

 

 

 

  

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, September 5, 2022 2:03 AM

The first photo in the previous post was edited from one supplied by Nate Gerstein. The second and third lightly edited photos supplied by James Greller, who authored and co-authored excellent books on Brooklyn rail transit.  The last two are mine, of cars awaiting scapping at Coney Island  Yard iun 1947.

The 5000s and 5100s were t5he only type of Brooklyn streetcar that ran into WWII that I did not ride.I

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, September 13, 2022 9:01 PM

A Lorimer Line car followed by a 6000-single-end on the Crosstown Line.  Rich Allman contributed to the photo restoration.  It would be wonderful if some readers identified 8368'd operator and the policeman and were able to give the photo to the families.

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, September 14, 2022 1:49 PM

A small coorrection to the avove phutu shows faintly a distant high-rise.

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, October 17, 2022 12:53 PM

 

 

 Lorikmer Line at Bartell-Pritchard Square, wher connectionms to the Coney Island Avenue - Smith Street ,line existed.

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, October 17, 2022 1:15 PM

This photo has a lot of personal history. 1010 is a Coney Island Avenue - Smith Street car from Coney Island.  Behind it is a Lorimer Line car, just come from the reversing crossover at the location of the previous phyoto.  Standing on the base of the streetcar station standarf is Thomas Lenthal, then Lowenthal. later an active member of the ERA NY Division.  My parents bought the black Leica D from his father. a Gerrman refugee photographer, whos family, including Tommy, lived in our brownstone's basement apartment until they could afford something better.  He was also a fellow camper at Camp Wahp-kee-nah in Hebron, New Hampshire on Newfound Lake. David Lews, my cousin, older of two sons of Nethanial Lewis (born Nethaniel Levitch) who owned the large drugstoire across from the LIRR Atlantic (Brooklyn) Terminal, and was a classmate at Columbia Grammar Prep., is crossing in front of the PCC we had exited, even though we were to board the Lorimer Line 8000 double-end Peter Witt behind the PCC.

For a long time I had wanted to go from Coney Island to the Yonkers - Hastings Line purely by Trolley.  (why not Coney Island - New Rochelle, I don't know.)  The route was either McDonald-Vanderbilt or Coney-Island-Smith to Park Row - City Hall. Manhatta, the TATS "T" to 161st Street, the "K"? to Marble Hill, 225th & Broadway, the "C" to the Bronx - Yonkers City Line at West 262nd Street, and the "1" to the hastings line.  I almost made it, but north of Main Street, Yonkers, I realized that going all the way would get me home too late for the regular dinner hour; thus off st the stairs doiwn to the NYCentral Glenwood Station, and caught an MU back tgo 125th Street, the Lexingtopn Avenue Subway, and the 86th Street bus crosstyown.

A few weeks later the "T" went bus.   But "K" put-ins and pull-outs still operated out of the 65th Street Shop and Carbarn. So. the alternative plan: C. I. Avenue to Bartrell-Pritchard Sq., Lorimer to Williamsburg, Crosstown or Graham to L. I. City, a 15-minute hike to the Vernon Avenue Queensboro Bridge Railway Station, and a short walk from the 2nd Avenue Termiknal to the 65th Street Carbarn and a ":K" just entering service, The plan worked.  But just for me and not for my two friends.  Because at Long Island City, after vfiewing the Bridge in the distance, they decided to return to Coney Island. 

 

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, October 26, 2022 11:43 AM

Correction:  Thev photo was at Bartell-Pritchard, butv t5hec cars are suthbound, notv the northbound cars we rode.

Here is single-end Peter-Witt 6073 on the Nostrand Avenhue Line at the intersection with Flatbush Avenue

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, October 27, 2022 7:28 AM

Busy Livingston Street in downtown Brooklyn

Also June 1947, age 15

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, October 30, 2022 4:28 AM

Another photo at the L. I. City Loop, taken on the Coney Island - Hastings trip describes earlier:

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, November 14, 2022 2:48 PM

And a few of the two 8500s. one in  post-WWII green-and-silver, the other in the traditional cream-an-maroon, same location of the cars, but the photo from the opposite location:

At Stillwell Avenue, Coney Island, a regular 86th Street Line car:

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, November 29, 2022 2:39 AM

The interlaced loops at Van Dyck and Richards Streets in tthe Sandy Hook neighborhood, at the southern end of Brooklyn's Crosstown and Erie Basin lines.  Detroit, Baltimore, and Cleveland single-end Petyer Witts, and of course single-end PCCs, have different front and rear architecture.  Brooklyn and deck-roof Pittsbergh cars had similar front-and-rear arcitecture.

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, December 1, 2022 5:09 AM

Double-end 8525, used as a double-ender on this fan-trip, but normally a single-ender on Myrtle Avenue, with sa turnstyle at one end, here on the Flushing (Main St.) - Ridgewood (Wycoff Avenue) Line near the grounds for the 1939-1940 abnd 1964 New York Worls Fairs.

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