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Third Avenue Lightweight Streetcars

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Posted by Firelock76 on Thursday, October 19, 2017 6:50 PM

Who cares if it doesn't reflect current operations?  Those old photos are cool!  Sometimes I think the folks over at "Trains" take this stuff WAY too seriously!

Thanks for posting them David!

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, October 20, 2017 7:55 AM

My photo of the 65th St. 3rd Ave. main workshop and car house is from a very scratched negative. I did not think the defects would show up as clearly as they have, so I've gone to work on it, with some improvement.  May be able to do more, but it does take time.  Here is a progress report.

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Posted by Firelock76 on Saturday, October 21, 2017 9:04 AM

Nice clean-up job!  Remember the old saying, "The best is the enemy of the good?"

Sometimes just have to go with what's available.

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Posted by daveklepper on Saturday, October 21, 2017 2:49 PM

Here is about as good as I can do within a reasonable amount time.  After that we will go north in Manhattan, mostly conduit cars, all the way to Marble Hill 225th St., nprthern end of conduit.  Details will wait until the edit button is restored.  Future postings will handle The Bronx, including some far south of 225, and then eventually Yonkers and Mt. Vernon.

But converables now have their own thread.

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, October 23, 2017 8:44 AM

More to come

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Posted by wanswheel on Monday, October 23, 2017 12:19 PM
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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, October 25, 2017 8:53 AM

Truthfuly, I did not know the Marx Bros. performed there.  I thought they performed in one or more Manhattan venues for the NY area.

Ex-Ogden Avneue car replacing convertable on "C" Bronx-and Van Courtland, on B'way at 238th.

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, October 25, 2017 9:57 AM

IMAGE

An unuaual photo from the Shore Line Trolley Museum Journal showing Brooklyn early double-truck hand-braked 1792 (still with its work-car sand-car number) on its way to East Haven CT followed by a Subway (241 & Wh. Pl. Rd/Av) - New Rochelle "A' car of the 301-400 series that were the regulars untl buses came in late 1950, shortly after the photo was taken.

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, October 30, 2017 7:59 AM

Looking East at West FArms Square, a lighweight bumped by buses from the "O" Ogden Avenue line, replaces a convertable on the "C" Bronx and Van Courtland Parks line, here discharging passengers before proceeding to the crossover on E.177the to change ends.

 

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Posted by MidlandMike on Monday, October 30, 2017 9:09 PM

Dave, the last post had no photo.  The post before that had a link to a photo, but it required a password.

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, October 31, 2017 2:49 AM

Here are both photos:

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, October 31, 2017 2:56 AM

One photo was an error, already on the Convertable thread. 

correct two photos are:

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Posted by MidlandMike on Tuesday, October 31, 2017 8:54 PM

daveklepper

Here are both photos:

 

What are we looking at in the bottom photo?

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, November 1, 2017 2:40 AM

West Farms Square looking west.  The lightweigh in the middle track is a gap-filler car, since the "T" Tremont Avenue line runs through.  The "v" Williams Bridge line will reverse here, use the crossover, and run on the east side of Bronx Park to Gun Hill Road and White Plains Avenue (Road according the IRT, but not the street sign!).  Curve-sided convertables were very rare, mostly scrapped, at the time in Autumn 1947, when this photo was taken.  Also, new paint job on 626, probably received when it got its trolley poles earlier that year after transfer from the bussed Manhattan Lines, has the front bottom skirt painted black instead of the regular deep red-maroon as on 676 which alway was a Bronx pole car.   Note the standard IRT Low-V cars on the structure in the background.  West Farms Square, Boston Road, Southern Boulevard, 177th Street, Tremont Avenue, was served by the "B, C, S, T, V," and "Z".  West Farms Car House was a few block south and west on Boston Road.  Below is a lightweight 388 dischargin all passengers, transfered from Ogden Avenue to the "C" after "O" Ogden, "U" University, and "Z" 180th Street were bussed in March 1947.  The convertable thread has "C" reversing on the crossover just east of the Square on E. 177th St.

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, November 9, 2017 12:34 AM

Now for some Yonkers lines pictures, starting at the end of the Broadway subway line at 242nd sTreet, Van Courtland Park.  The 1, 2, lines and their short-turn 3 reversed here, while the C from West Farms Square ran through to 262nd Street, Yonkers City Line.

On Warburton Avenue.  Note Nachod signal

Foot of Main Street, Near NY Central Sta.

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, November 9, 2017 3:55 AM

End of then usable track on Neperhan Avenue, fan trip with one 101-class car, oriignally a conduit car in Manhattan, and one 301-class car, always a Yonkers car.  plus  regular service line 5 car.

On the service track between the 5 Neperhan Avenue and the 6 Tuckaho Rd lines at the crossing with an industry branch of he Central's Putnam Division.

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Posted by MidlandMike on Thursday, November 9, 2017 8:50 PM

Would NY Transit cars run thru into Yonkers, or were they two seperate systems?

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, November 10, 2017 1:57 AM

The systems were privately owned, and for most of the streetcar history, the Third Avenue Railway System, after 1939 the Third Avenue Transit System, was the real owner of the Yonkers, Bronx, and its Manahattan streetcar lines.  The Park Avenue "2," and the Warbirton Avenue "1" were extended south to meet the IRT at West 242nd Street, Broadway, with the South Broadway line that ran north only to Gettys Square retained as the "3," really a short-turn for the "1" and "2."  They crossed into The Bronx at the city line, W. 262nd Street, also the north end of Van Courtland Park.

The "4," McClean Avenue, also ran into The Bronx, connecting with the north end of the Jerome Avenue IRT at Woodlawn Road.  Its history is more complex. At one time it crossed Central Avenue, the extension of Jerome Avenue all the way up to White Plains, and turned south on Webster Avenue to run to the north end of the Third Avenue Elevated at Bedford Park, Treemont Avenue.  There was also the Jerome Avenue streetcar line, north end at Yonkers Race Track, Yonkers Avenue, that ran south, crossing into The Bronx and continiung south to 161st, then running east over the McCoombs Dam Bridge, with the Ogden Avenue and 161st Street Bronx crosstown to 155th and 8th connecting with the 9th Avenue elevated, later all extended to Amsterdam and 155th.  With some abandonments, the "4" took its final form.

The "5" and "6" and "8"" and "9" were Yonkers-only lines.  The "7" was a major east-west line running to the Mount Vernon New Haven RR Sta. and connecting with "A" New Rochelle line.

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, November 10, 2017 8:10 AM

In addition to the 1, 2, 3, and 4 lines from Yonkers entering The Bronx, the A line from the New Rochelle New Haven Station and the B line from the New Haven Mount Vernon Station entered The Bronx at East 261st Street and connected with the White Plains Avenue (Road on IRT subway signs) subway lines at East 241st Street.  For some reason the B, but the A, continiued south to East 229th Street. 

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Posted by MidlandMike on Friday, November 10, 2017 9:49 PM

daveklepper

...

The "4," McClean Avenue, also ran into The Bronx, connecting with the north end of the Jerome Avenue IRT at Woodlawn Road.  Its history is more complex. At one time it crossed Central Avenue, the extension of Jerome Avenue all the way up to White Plains, and turned south on Webster Avenue to run to the north end of the Third Avenue Elevated at Bedford Park, Treemont Avenue.  ...

 

Did a trolley run all the way up to White Plains?

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Posted by daveklepper on Saturday, November 11, 2017 12:52 PM

I believe there was a gap that was not filled.  The 1 line did run further into downtown Hastings, and there was an isolated Third Avenue-run Tarrrytown - White Plains line.   Here is a map of the system as I renenber it 1940 to the end of Bronx lines in 1948 and start of Westchester abandonments in 1950 or 1951.  As long as Yonkers lines and Westechester lines ran, they did continue to enter The Bronx to the subway line terminals, with the B even continuing further south to 229th Street.

This is from memory, so there may be errors.

 

I should note that with the exception of the Sedgewick Avenue line in The Bronx, which in my day was a one-car every-half-hour semi-shuttle, all single-track operations of Third Avenue were in Yonkers during this period.  The 8 on Riverdale Avenue used two cars with a passing siding midway.  The 9 Elm & Walnut used one car, with a steep grade, and the only derailer on the system.  Going back downtown on Walnut just after leaving the outer terminal, the operator had to come to full stop and key the derailer off to continue downhill.

Also, the only track on the entire Third Avenue system that was not in pavement (after ending their operations on the Queensboro and Manhattan Bridges where track was shared with othe companies, long before my time)  was on the outer end of the 5 Neperhan Avenue line.

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Posted by MidlandMike on Saturday, November 11, 2017 9:45 PM

Thanks.  You also answred my next question, which was to confirm the Tarrytown-White Plains line.

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Posted by MidlandMike on Friday, November 17, 2017 10:24 PM

I found out that in addition to the NH and NYW&B between New Rochelle and Port Chester, there was also a trolley.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_and_Stamford_Railway

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Saturday, November 18, 2017 12:21 PM

Yes, and it did run all the way from New Rochelle to Stamford.  Third Avenue actually owned the rack as far as Rye, with a local line New Rochelle RR Station to to Rye Beach.  (Rye also had a NYW&B stop, sorry I left that out, New Rochelle, Larchmont, Memaroneck, Harrison, Rye, Portchester. Do I have the order correct?)  Of course I can check Metro-North timetable on-line.)  The New York and Stamford was a real interurban, not just a cross-country trolley line, since it operated genuine Jewett or Jewett-style railroad-roof green interurban cars.  It was an essential part of the trolley-car link between Waterville, Maine, and New York.  It connected with Connecticut Company lines in Stamford.

At the New Haven RR Station forecort, there were was a multi-line departure board, which is now the the Branford Electric Ry. Association's Shore Line Trolley Museum in or near the East Haven Sprague Station.  Subway, Rye Beach, and Stamford are among the destinations shown.  There were two or three New Rochelle local lines.

One of my earliest memories is looking out of the back window of a car as we went under the subway's elevated structure on White Plains Road and then out into the open at E  241st, followed by a Third Avenue convertable.  The tracks remained in sight all through the trip through New Rochelle, including the abandoned tracks north of where the active loops serving the station turned off, and then the track swerved to the north or east side of the road and dissapeared.  This was in 1935, I was three-and-a-half, and I have recounted the return trip from Hartford and my memory of the steam locomotive.

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Posted by MidlandMike on Saturday, November 18, 2017 8:58 PM

I was suprised to hear that The NY & Stamford was a full interurban.  I figured it must have been a rinky-dink trolley, such that NH thought it was worth it to finance the NYW&B interurban New Rochelle-Port Chester extension.  Maybe the extension was just to supplement (relieve?) the NH on some of the local business.

And yes, you have the correct order of stations.

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Posted by MidlandMike on Sunday, November 19, 2017 10:59 PM

I read that the NYW&B passengers to the 133rd St Terminal could connect to th 3rd Avenue El.  I also read that the Third Ave bridge carried that line.  Were the rails carried at road deck level?  Did making the bridge one-way in 1941 affect rail transit?

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, November 20, 2017 12:20 AM

The existing Third Avenue bridge once had streetcar tracks, and for many years the line was a shuttle from 149th Street, the Hub, Westchester Avenue, Boston Road, Webster Avenue, Third Avenue. Willis Avenue all converging south over the bridge to 129th Street and Third Avenue and a connection with the conduit Third Avenue streetcar.  When the bridge was made one-way before WWII, the tracks became service non-revenue only, used during the middle of the night for car transfer, and the replacement bus was the same as the replacement for the Willis Avenue-125th Street streetcar, since the First Avenue Bridge also became one-way the other way.

 The Third Avenue Elevated had a completely different bridge.  Originally built by the Suburban Company it saw steam elevated trains from 129th Street, a joint station, Suburban, 2nd Av. and 3rd Av. Els., track map on the Remember the Third Ave. El thread, north to Treemont Avenue AND New York New Haven and Hartford Harlem Shuttle steam trains, with elevated-dimension coaches, from New  Rochelle.  After electrification of the elevateds in 1903, 3rd Avenue trains ran through to Treemont Avenue, and shuttle from 129th St. was established to Willis Avenue station where the NYNH&H steam trains, later electrified, terninated.  After the dual contracts, and the IRT rebuilding of the elevateds, the single-level double-track bridge was replaced with a two-level bridge, with two tracks on each level.  The upper level was used only during rush hours by 3rd and 2nd Avenue Expresses, with the lower level used all the time.  The elevated shuttles to Willis Avenue continued to operate using the lower level.  This bridge does not exist today.

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Posted by MidlandMike on Monday, November 20, 2017 10:20 PM

Thanks, I looked at the map on the earlier thread.  Using that map, it looks like the El bridge might be the bridge identified as the Secong Av Br on the linked 1947 topo map:

https://ngmdb.usgs.gov/img4/ht_icons/Browse/NY/NY_Central%20Park_122894_1947_24000.jpg

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, November 21, 2017 12:32 AM

Correct.  The bridge was located at 2nd Avenue.  It did not have a roadway for regular vehicles, and was used for elevated trains exclusively.   I think a new roadway bridge may have replaced it.

The two levels of track north of the bridge were on PRoW, even though elevated.  The takeoff for the Willis Avenue station was a track between the two lower-level tracks that ramped down to ground level after the take-off for the lead to the small elevated yard where the old steam locomotives were stored until sale.   The Willis Avenue station had the elevated, the NYNH&H Harlem Shuttle, and the NYW&B.

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, November 21, 2017 5:54 AM

There are videos of the 'last days' of the 2nd and 3rd Avenue Els (narrated by Roger Arcara iianm) that clearly show the bridges and track arrangements with discussion (and film!) of operations across them.

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Posted by MidlandMike on Tuesday, November 21, 2017 9:26 PM

Are those videos on line?

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, November 23, 2017 1:07 PM

Yes, definitely, on U-Tube.   Google Second and Third Avenue Elevateds, and you will reach it.   Very good, except too much footage on scrapping and disposing of old cars.  Also one minior error.  The streetcar undr the 2nd Avenue and 42nd Street Station he calls a 42nd Street crosstowno is clearly a double-end Peter Witt 551-series lightweight assigned only to the Broadway - 42nd Street Line.  The 42nd St. Crosstown was run almost entirely by curved-side convertables with the occasional Sunday-only appearance of end-door 626-series lightweights borrowed from the 59th Street crosstown.

Also the old subway cars used as elevated express trains were composites, not mostly wood.  We called them The Comoposites.

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, October 7, 2018 7:34 AM

As an experiment, one of the aluminum bodied 551-600 Brodway - 42nd Street "Huffliners" was left mainly unpainted aliluminum with red numbers and trim.  After some months it was painted creamy yellow and red like the oeathers.  I copied this photo 71 years ago from the companies files.

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, October 9, 2018 9:03 AM

Here we are at the north end of the West Farms carhouse, August 1948, with 194 the last car on the Boston Road line,  The elevated structure is that use by the 2 and 5.  The car saw four more years of service in Yonkers, until 1952.

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Posted by MidlandMike on Tuesday, October 9, 2018 8:22 PM

Dave, it does not look like the photo made it into your last post.

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, October 10, 2018 1:09 PM

Strange.  Should be able to correct this tomorrow with a wide-band server.

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, October 11, 2018 2:33 AM

corrected by this post with another from the same day:

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, October 14, 2018 4:51 AM

Correction to previous posts. 194 was not the last car and was at the north upper level portal on Southern Bkvd of the West Farms car-house.  196, the last car, was photographed inside on the lower level, back entrnce.  Both cars saw addional service in Yonkers replacing 301-400 series cars that needed overhauling.

In the autumn 1947 the Columbia Grammar Prep Football team played a game (Bronx Highschool of Science?) on the public park field across 161st Street from Yankee Stadium; and, while photographing football actifities, I did manage a passing photo of 130, formerly a conduit car for the "T"and "K" Manahttan routes, but transfered to the Bronx with troilley pole in March 1947.  I think it was sold to someplace in Indua in 1948.  The Elevated structure in the background is here on River Street, merges into Jerome Avenue, behind me here, just before the 167th Street Station.  The "4" is the line today.  The streetcar line is the 161st-163rd  Street Crosstown.

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, January 10, 2019 5:05 AM

Here are all photos scanned so far for my favorite streetcar, the Broadway - 42nd Street Huffliner named for Slaughter Huff, Pres. of Third Avenue Railway and then Third Avenue Tansit, and believer in conltinued streetcar operation on heavy routes.  Two or three posted earlier.

551 was the sample prototype, aluminum.  Reportadly built by Brill.  552-600 were also aluminium, but assembled at the Third Avenue'shop at E. 65th St. and Third Avenue.

Here it is equipped with a temporar single trolley pole at the Gardner Avenue, Mt. Veron, yard, shorly after its completion in 1938.  Its visit to Yonkers and Westchester may have been to test its speed capabilities on Yonkers Avenue, where sustained relatively high speed ws possible, and it probably was run all the way to New Rochelle to get tusrned around at the loop there.

555, one of the 551- 600 aluminum production run, was left as unpainted aluminum, with a thin red stripe.  The wood doors were painted silver to match.  The car is in front of the 129th Stret and Amsterdam Av. carhouse. 551 had exit doors opposed, 552-600, and the Corten steel 601 - 625 had staggered exit doors; 551's were opposite.

551 - 625 were the only Peter Witt Third Avenue cars.  All others in the era of one-man operation had rear exits.  577 is at or around 86th & Broadway.

597 is southbound at Broadway and 73rd Street.

Sao Paulo, Brazil

 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, January 10, 2019 9:16 AM

Thanks for your efforts on this David, it's a fascinating look at a vanished time!

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Posted by Overmod on Thursday, January 10, 2019 11:20 AM

Didn't Richard Rodgers briefly have Huff in mind before he changed the street in the song title from 3rd to 10th?

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, January 10, 2019 11:32 AM

And in addition to being Peter Witts, 551-625 differed from the other new lightweights in copying the Agasote?? ceiling treatment of the PCCs and their frosted glass lighting.  The other new lightweighs, 101-200, 301-400, and 626-685 had bare roofs and exposed bulbs.  Reversable seating was rattan.  In addition, there were wood-board seats that were turned down from upright actoss the unused doorways on the off-side of the car, since only right-hand doors were used.  And an additdional wood seat was the top of the sandbox.

Really my favorite streetcars

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, January 17, 2019 2:39 AM

After the 1937 - 1938 construction of the Peter-Witt door-arrangement "Huffliners," again my favorite cars, 551 - 625, the last homemade lightweights were 626 - 685.  626 - 645 were conduit cars for 59th Street Crosstown, with one or two replacing convertables on 42nd Street Crosstown on Sundays.  They had special truckx using some rubber inlays to reduce noise.  May and June 1947 they got trolley poles and joined trolley-pole 646-685 to close out specifically Bronx atreetcar lines in August 1948.  (Yonkers lines entered The Bronx until 1952.)  The 59th Street X was the first line converted post-WWIi, 1 November 1946, while the Tremont Avenue line was one that lasted until August 1948.  See Jack May's report on his Vienna visits, TRAINS Transi Forum, for the further use of most of these cars.  The Bronx's Tremont Avenue line was joined by Southern Boulevard "S", Westchester Avenue "A", and Boston Post Road "B" as the final four.   In addition to 626-685, 101-200 and some high-numbered 300's that originally were conduit cars, closed The Bronx service.  All the wood convertables had been scrapped,

 

 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, January 17, 2019 12:08 PM

Pictures two and three have a nice surprise in them, an Esso gas station!

It's been a long time since I've seen one of those!

Thanks David!

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Posted by Miningman on Thursday, January 17, 2019 1:58 PM

Plenty of Esso stations still up here right across the whole land. 

Esso/Imperial Oil a household name in Canada due to their sponsorship of Hockey Night in Canada right from Day1 of TV. 

Back in da day when I was a kid the Esso commercials during the hockey game was LIVE! Anyone remember Murray Westgate? Bow tie, Station attendant outfit, tire gauge in breast pocket. He was as popular as the hockey players. Died Aug /2018 age 100. 

Here's an ad:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=S6cWeVy-xA8

Stateside Esso became Exxon and, to put in a railroad connection, the Exxon logo was designed by Raymond Lowery. How about that! 

We still have uniformed gas station attendants up here in La Ronge. We'll sort of, Co-oP gas bar gas jockeys wear black and red outfits and matching parkas in the winter. Name on the jacket, tire gauge, the whole schtick. Yes they always always always clean the windshield. 

On the other hand we have old Herman and his entire one early 60's pump thats so beat up, no glass cover, and super slow. Don't know how he gets away with it. Think he summons the bears when the inspectors come up a-la Tarzan. 

 

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Posted by rcdrye on Thursday, January 17, 2019 5:22 PM

Nice shot of 631.  I have many happy hours at its controller at Seashore (Complete with "X Crosstown" panel), where it awaits motor bearing work and other TLC when money becomes available.

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Posted by seppburgh2 on Thursday, January 17, 2019 9:12 PM
Awesome! Thanks for sharing a view into a long gone era.
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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Friday, January 18, 2019 10:21 AM

As an aside, the ESSO brand name could not be used nationwide in the United States as part of the Standard Oil break-up agreement.  Consequently, the "Oklahoma" and later the ENCO brand name were used in the Midwest.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by Deggesty on Friday, January 18, 2019 1:31 PM

I grew up in South Carolina, knowing  "ESSO" quite well. You could buy Standard Oil of New Jersey products in both Carolinas, Tennessee, Louisiana and, I think, Virginia. My oldest brother worked at the ESSO refinery in Baton Rouge.

Johnny

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Posted by Jones1945 on Saturday, January 19, 2019 6:31 AM

There are at least 42 Esso gas stations in the city I am living in. So no worries, Esso is still with us. CoffeeLaugh

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, January 20, 2019 2:54 AM

Please see a spelling correction and additional information on my previous posting.

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, March 7, 2019 2:24 AM

Here is 637, built for 59th St., Manhattan, without poles and with a conduit "plow" current-collector after it received poles and was moved to The Bronx at the eastern terminal od the Tremont Street line.  (Union Port Avenue?)

And on a demonstration run, probably for visitors from Vienna, on Southeern Blvd.  Correction:  The 59th Street photo is of duplicate 631. Apologies.

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Posted by Overmod on Thursday, March 7, 2019 6:43 AM

CSSHEGEWISCH
As an aside, the ESSO brand name could not be used nationwide in the United States as part of the Standard Oil break-up agreement.  Consequently, the "Oklahoma" and later the ENCO brand name were used in the Midwest.

Different brand names were 'proprietary' to the various independent companies that Standard Oil was broken up into, a problem with "Esso" (it's from S.O. meaning Standard Oil of New Jersey) being that it couldn't be used in areas that had other "Standard Oils" (like Sohio or SOCONY).  The creation of "Exxon" in the computer was an attempt to synthesize a national brand that would not suffer from the problems Humble Oil had with the Esso (and then Enco) branding in the '60s as it tried to establish a national presence.

I don't usually like citing Wikipedia but they have a pretty good discussion-in-a-nutshell here.

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Posted by Overmod on Thursday, March 7, 2019 6:47 AM

The New York and Stamford was also one of those roads with a lavish private car, a detail that should surely find its way into recent discussion.

Seems to me that one of the topics here is the 'plow exchange' in the vicinity of the Willis Avenue Bridge, where apparently there was expanded vault space for people to attach and detach plows quickly, if not in fact 'on the fly'.  Presumably there was a procedure similar to that at Penn Station to ensure that the overhead connection (or at least the collector contact) was not 'energized' at the same time the plow's was...

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, March 26, 2019 6:29 AM

The south end of the Willis Avenue Bridge on First Avenue, around East 128th Street did have a "plow-pit," and the Willis Avenue convertable streetcars switched between conduit opertion beween that point and the Fort Lee Ferry at the Hudson shore at West 125th Street, and overhead wire north to 149th Street ("The Hub") Willis Avenue, Third Avenue, 149th Street, Melrose Avenue (location of the 3rd Avenue Station of the existing 2 and 5 subway lines).  That line went bus just before the Trioboro Bridge was construted, construction that interfered with the streetcar operation.

 But the plow-pit at West 145th Street and Lenox Avenue was used by the 149th Street Crosstown until the summer of 1947.

Here are some photos from the Georgetown plow-pit on the Capitol Transit Cabin John line, already posted on the Capitol Transit thread, but here repeated to give you an idea of how they worked.

Coming from downtown:

Towards downtown:

And between times:

Plow-pit man:

At the Benning Road Plow-pit:

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Posted by MidlandMike on Tuesday, March 26, 2019 11:07 PM

The plow pit opening looks big enough for a auto wheel or pedestrian to fall into.  Were they normally open like in the photo.

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Posted by rcdrye on Wednesday, March 27, 2019 9:04 AM

MidlandMike

The plow pit opening looks big enough for a auto wheel or pedestrian to fall into.  Were they normally open like in the photo.

 

That's what the bollards are for.  The Benning Rd. pit was used by WB&A interurbans prior to 1935.

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Posted by daveklepper on Saturday, July 13, 2019 3:37 PM

   

Left, 125th and 3rd, with a "K" heading to the nearby trailing crossover to reverse and return north to 225th and Broadway, Marble Hill, or just possibly continuing south on 3rd Avenue to the 65th Street barn and shops.  The 125th crosstown, also still streetcar at the time, continued straight ahead to 1st Avenue.

Right, "K" wewstbound on 125th at 5th Avenue with a crosstown immediastely following.  Note NY Centeral, now Metro North, station in backround.

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Posted by Miningman on Saturday, July 13, 2019 10:37 PM

Any chance you could try to get the pictures up Dave. 

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, July 14, 2019 10:39 AM

I have edited this post because my email access at the Yeshiva is reasonably decent now.  3 Nov 2020

Still appreciate your interest.

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Posted by Miningman on Sunday, July 14, 2019 2:07 PM

Here are the missing 2 pictures on Third Ave. from David. Glad to help out Dave.

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, August 20, 2019 9:41 AM

i did some electronic darkroom work on this photo for better balance and wish you to benefit from it.

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, December 2, 2019 3:30 AM

Third Avenue in the final month, March 1947, of the "T" Third and Amsterdam Avenues, line.  (125th St. was the link between the two Avenues.)  Note that its track was maintained until after 29 June 1947 for the K, ("Kingsbridge") 125th, Amst., St. Nich,m and B'way line, and south of 125th to 65th and 3rd for put-ins and pull-out that would carry passengers.  Park Row. Bowery and 6th, and 125th and 3rd photos:

 

 

Problems.   Added photos when problems fixed.

 

 

 

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, December 2, 2019 12:04 PM

Believe the problem is solved:

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, August 12, 2020 9:22 AM

1

This photo was taken before I received the first camera I owned, a black Leica D.  It was the first railfan photo I took. either with my parents' folding camera, or with a friend's Rollaflex. The streetcar design (Aluminum) is my very favorite, the Broadway - 42nd Street line the one I rode most often as a kid, and the location where my favorite restaurants are located.  72nd and Amsterdam and Broadway.  Look closely and you can see the 10th Avenue line going off to the left, with car 600 barely past the junction.

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, August 13, 2020 9:01 AM

It never fails to amaze me what was, and now isn't.  

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, August 18, 2020 1:18 AM

Two ex-Manhattan, conduit, Third and Amsterdam Avenue cars, now with poles for operation in The Bronx, at the 161st  street Bronx Concourse underpass in late 1947:

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, August 24, 2020 1:44 AM

Most of the 1936-1937, first mostly-new-material and regenrative-braling, home-built Third Avenue lightweights in the 301-400 series were assigned to Yonkers and Subway - New Rochelle service.  Exceptions were 397-400, equipped for conduit and assisting 101-200 on Manhattan routes, 101-200 similar, but built by splicing two single-truck cars together.  Also five others, including 374 pictures, were assigned to The Bronx's Ogdan Avenue Line because of its steep grade.  When Ogden Avenue went bus, they were to replace 229th St. - Mt. Vernon convertable cars, but apparently 384 was kept in The Bronx and used on the 161st Crosstown X, which used Jerome Avenue for a short distance between the ramp to the McCoombs Dam Bridge (to 155th St. and the Polo Grounds) and 161st where it is shown.  It got to Yonkers and Westchester soon after, however.

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, August 24, 2020 6:58 AM

My grievous error!   The north end of Jerome Avenue, not the south end.  A "4" and not an "X" at the front.  On the right is the entrance to the Woodlawn IRT elevated terminal for the subwayi line now labeled 4 (but not in 1948).  And the 384 probably was always a Yonkers ciar, and the 4 Yonkers route is the McLean Avenue line from Foot of Main Street (by the NYCentral Station), through Getty's Sqiare, to Jerome Avenue and Woodlawn Rd.  Here's an upgrade of the picture:

  

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, August 25, 2020 5:43 AM

Error upon error. Jack May, my The Bronx expert, had told me the concrete structure is not what I thought it was, this confirmed by a resident Transit Authoritiy expert, and that the location is Bascobal Place on Ogden Avenue, a short distance south of the east end of Washington Bridge, and thus 384 is on the "O" Ogden Avenue, the route that crossed the Harlem River twice, running from 155th Street and Amsterdam Avenue to 181st Street and Broadway via Ogden Avenue in The Bronx..

But here is ex-Manhattan 141 on 138th Street in The Bronx:

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, August 26, 2020 2:04 AM

Showing the transformation of some of the newest Third Avenue cars from conduit Manhattan cars to pole The Bronx cars, 640 is an example:

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Posted by daveklepper on Saturday, August 29, 2020 4:45 PM

More at the east end of the Washington Bridge:

 

 

 

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, September 7, 2020 10:42 PM

194 near the 125th Street Fort Lee Ferry and then after the last day od Bronx Streetcars (now with trolley pole) in the Bronx West Farms carhouse.  It lasted a few more years in Yonkers:

 

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, October 30, 2020 7:05 AM

Park Row - City Hall. March 1947:

Third and Amsterdam Avenue Line, but before December 1935 tracks at this location shared with 4th and Madisob line, the successor to the World's original street railwaטץ

 

 

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, November 3, 2020 7:28 AM

  8/31/85    125th & 8th to 186th and Amsterdam
12/01/86    125th St from river to river
12/05/93    3rd Ave from 130th to 6th
  2/11/94    3rd Ave line from 6th to Park Row

Note that at 125th and Third, the north-south cables were located below the original east-west ones.

End of cable operation (the following day electric operation began):

  9/10/99    125th Street from river to river and Amsterdam
10/22/99    3rd Ave from 130th to 65th
11/18/99    3rd Ave line from 65th to Park Row (65th to 6th electric and 6th to Park Row horse starting 11/19, 6th to Park Row electric from 11/24

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, November 3, 2020 7:18 PM

Jack May corrected me in that The Bowery and Park Row had four tracks.

The line that came closest to being an interurban in the Third Avenue system  was the New Rochelle (at the NYNH&H Sta.) - Subway (E. 241st St. and White Pl. Rd-Av.) line which connected The Bronx, Mt. Vernon, Pelham, and New Rochelle.  But this was all paved in-street track.   The Yonkers "5" line, Neperhan Avenue, was wholey within Yonkers, but, after TARS' two East River bridge lines quit, had the only revenue track of the system not in pavement.

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, November 9, 2020 8:13 AM

The northern terminal:

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, November 9, 2020 8:22 AM

And returning to Manhattan, we saw 180 at Park Row City Hall in an earlier posting von this thread.  Here it is adjacent to the main shop and carhouse at 65th Street, with the Elevated's 67th Street Station in the background:

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, November 12, 2020 8:35 AM

Changing ends at the Foot of Main Street, fan-trip or regular "7" car to Mt. Vernon, while a long-distance New York Central train speeds through the Yonkers Station without stopping. 

The following photo was sent me as taken as a screenshot.  Does anyone know who was the photographer?  Just possibly may have been myself, and a previous posting has another identical "K" car at the same location, 125th St. and 3d Av.

There is something very unusual about this photo.  125th & 3rd is the south end of the "K," as it is for the replacement M100 bus today.  Usually, a "K" would turn the corner, change ends, use the spring-loaded trailing crossover, and return to 125th Street for the  run to Marble Hill, Broadway and W. 225th Street.  So why is somebody boarding the car?  Does he plan to ride north although boarding at a southbound car-stop?  Or is about to be told by the operator not to board?  Or is the car a pull-out, headed for the 3rd Avenue & 65th Street Carhouse?  

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Posted by MidlandMike on Thursday, November 12, 2020 9:59 PM

[

daveklepper

 

There is something very unusual about this photo.  125th & 3rd is the south end of the "K," as it is for the replacement M100 bus today.  Usually, a "K" would turn the corner, change ends, use the spring-loaded trailing crossover, and return to 125th Street for the  run to Marble Hill, Broadway and W. 225th Street.  So why is somebody boarding the car?  Does he plan to ride north although boarding at a southbound car-stop?  Or is about to be told by the operator not to board?  Or is the car a pull-out, headed for the 3rd Avenue & 65th Street Carhouse?  

 

Are there 2 levels of elevated track in the photo?

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, November 13, 2020 5:14 AM

Yes, the two local track are n the first level, and the bi-directtional, signalled, south in AM, north in PM, express track above.

Its platforms are directly over the local tracks.

This was typical of Manhattan elevated express stations, often called "hump stations."

125th St., 3rd Ave., was an exception, in that north of the station, the express track continued on an upper level to the upper level of the 4-track double-level bridge over the Harlem River.

See the thread on Remembering the Third Avenue Elevated.

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, November 13, 2020 5:19 AM

Also, on this thread, one of my previously posted photos shows 199 turning the corner possibly just moments after the screen-shot photo, so unless other information is available, I'll assume a missing photo  has been returned to me.

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, November 24, 2020 7:49 PM

AT Third Avenue and 65th Street:

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, December 23, 2020 10:30 PM

Formr 59th Street Manhattan conduit car 628 at a Bronx location to be determined, and ex-Third Avnue Manhattan conduit car 104 entering The Bronx on the 207th Street Fordham Road Crosstown:

 

 

 

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Posted by MidlandMike on Wednesday, December 23, 2020 10:49 PM

daveklepper

 ...ex-Third Avnue Manhattan conduit car 104 entering The Bronx on the 207th Street Fordham Road Crosstown:

 

 

 

 

What bridge is the trolley crossing?  I assume it is over the Harlem River.

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, December 24, 2020 3:24 PM

Correct, and usually called the 207th Street Bridge.

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, December 30, 2020 1:53 PM

Third Avenue and E. 86th Street, 124 on the line for which it was built:

Former conduit car 127 on Tremont Avenue Line on Burnside Avenue approaching  University Avenue:

 

Former conduit car replacing convertabils on the 167th Si. Crosstown approaching the Washington Bridge to West 181st Street, Manhattan:

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, December 30, 2020 2:02 PM

And this previously "unknown location" is on Burnside Avenue west of Webster Avenue.

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Posted by MidlandMike on Wednesday, December 30, 2020 9:41 PM

daveklepper

Third Avenue and E. 86th Street, 124 on the line for which it was built:

 

I presume that is the 3rd Avenue El above the trolley tracks.  Which came first, and were they competitors, at least initally?

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, December 31, 2020 10:42 PM

Correct.  First came the horsecar streetcar, Manhattan's second, after the NY & Harlem on 4th Avenue and lower Park Avenue, ,then came the steam-operated elevated, then conversion of the horsecar line to cable. then cable to conduit electrification, then conversion of the steam elevated line to electricity, then rebuilding of the elevated with a continuous center track, then conversion of the streetcar to bus with tracks above 59th Street kept in service several months for use of the 65th Street shops for Queensboro Bridge cars and K and 125 X put-ins and pull-outs, then abandonment and removal of the elevated.

rc can more easily provide the exact dates.

Note correction to a previous post and insertion of the missing photo.

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Posted by MidlandMike on Friday, January 1, 2021 11:16 PM

I presume they were built as competitors.  Did they eventually under the same management ?

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Posted by rcdrye on Saturday, January 2, 2021 7:08 AM

The Third Avenue line converted to cable in two sections, north of 6th on Dec 4, 1893 and to the Post Office on February 11, 1894. According to Hilton's "Cable Car in America" it required 4350 tons of iron yokes and 46000 barrels of cement.  The cable installation was barely complete before TARS started converting other lines to conduit electric operation.  The Third Avenue line was converted in 1899. Among cable lines Third Avenue was considered number two in traffic density, after Chicago's  State Street line.

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Posted by daveklepper on Saturday, January 2, 2021 12:31 PM

Midland Mike:  All the lines dikscussed in my posting were built as competitors.  For a short time, all streetcar lines were leased to the Metropolitan Railway, but reverted to the originsal owners shofrtly after that company entered receivership.

Unification in Manhattan between surface and rapid transit took place well after bus conversion and even after end of the South Ferry - Chatham Square part of the Third Avbenue Elevated.

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, January 4, 2021 10:44 PM

Conduit cars equipped with poles (1947) on the 161st-163rd St. Crosstown, probably on West 155th Street Manhattan just west of 8th Avenue, the Polo Grounds, and the McdCoombs Dam Bridkge to The Bronx, where 186 is headed, with the end point the destination sign shows as Hunts Point.  127 will get as far as Amsterdam Avenue.

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, January 14, 2021 1:34 PM

Two on the "T" on Amsterdam Avenue

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, January 17, 2021 5:17 AM

Conduit car as intended as built on Third AvenueL

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, January 19, 2021 9:10 AM

Jan. - March 1947 some ex-Broadway-42nd Street "Huffliners" were used on the "K" before being sold to Sao Paulo, Brazil: 

While some ex 59th-Street cars got poles and joined the similar cars in The Bronx, here just west of Bruckner and University:

while others sayed as conduit cars a few months more and were used on the Third & Amsterdam line, evntually also getting  poles, with some going to Vienna in 1949.

 

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, March 25, 2021 12:30 PM

2nd car of a two-car fan-trip, photo from the rear-window of the first car.  Not sure whether this is ibna residential section on the Tuckahoe Road line in Yonkers.

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, March 26, 2021 9:01 AM

Regukar route 8, Riverdale Avenue, car at the south end of this single-track, one passing siding, two car Yonkers line, the north end at Main Street.  The difference in  paving marks the New Yrk City (The Bronx) - Yonkers boundery.   As far as I know, this lilne never ran siuth into New York City.

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, March 26, 2021 3:28 PM

That paving change makes an unmistakable demarcation line!  My late father-in-law was a Yonkers kid, he probably knew exactly where it was.

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, March 31, 2021 4:22 AM

More from the fan-trip, Nererhan Avenue Line (One may need additional work.)

But the middkle photo is at the south terminal of the "8" Riverdale Avenue Line.  (The New York City lborder.):

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, April 25, 2021 9:39 AM

Back to Manhattan, and it is 1937, and 555 is still unpainted to demonstrate that 551 - 600 are indeed aluminum.  At 121st and Broadway, 555 is northbound, and Union Theological Seminary is on the west side of Broadway.

To the Brnx, the first streetcar that I actually ran. on the Bailey Avenue line.

The north terminal was at W 231 and Broadway, and previous photos show a second-hand car there.

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, May 21, 2021 9:56 AM


Enhanced side-view?

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, June 1, 2021 2:59 AM

Looking NE on Westchester Avenue, with the edlevated structure still used by the Lexington Avenue "6" train.  Year 1939 home-built 651 was normally used on the "Pelhsm Bar Parkway.T" Tremont & Burnside Avernues Line, but here carries a removable plate X - 167th Street Crioxsxtowsn.  Westchester Avenue is its eastern terminal.  Eds are chanhged on the northbound track also used by Westchester Avenue "A" cars to Pelham Bay Parkway.

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, June 8, 2021 4:10 AM

185 is at the intersection where 125th turns from going directly west to a nrthwest alignment.  Third Avenue had a horsecar, then battery-car line that used the connecting street south-east to 110th Street, and then 110th to the East River.  Note that the eastbound switchpoint has not been removeed, even in 1947, more than 20 years after the switch ceased being used.

eastbo

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, June 8, 2021 4:27 AM

Interior of the 65th Street and Third Avenue Carhouse, main floor:

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, June 29, 2021 11:37 AM

301 - 400 were built in the 3rd Av. & 65th St. Shop in 1936 - 1937.  301-390 were pole cars, mostly assigned to Yonkers, some to the "A" New Rochelle - Subway, and 5 or 6 to Ogden Avenue, The Bronx.  391 - 400 were Manhattan conduit cars, initially serving with some of the 101 - 200 cars on Broadway - 42nd Street, but beginning in 1948 replaced by the double-end Peter-Witt "Huffliners" and transfered to 3rd and Amsterdam ("T") and 125th St St. Nich & B;way, ("K" for Kingsbridge).

At Amsterdam & 145th St., both the T and the K crossed the  conduit & wire 149th St. Crosstown X.  Connecting curves were used by the one-car, every 45-minutes B'way-145th St. line.

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, July 25, 2021 3:21 AM

also posted on the Remembering the Third Avenue Elevated thread:

A Joe Franks picture, looking east at the Elevated's Fordham Road Station.  The Third Avenue Transit sweeper and relocated ex-Manhattan Streetcar are both on one od the two stub tracks that remain from the long-gone 3rd Avenue Bronx streetcar line, not on the Fordham Road tracks used by the X 207-Fordham Crosstown, and C Bronx and Van Courtland Park regular cars.  Others assumed that the train of composites on the Elevated's center track is a Through Express from 241 St. to City Hall, but both morning and evening Through Expresses operated on the local track of the correct direction, since they made all stops north of Tremont Avenue.  Instead, it is morning Through Express equipment running light returning from City Hall to its regular lay-up location on the center track between Fordham Road and Gun Hill Road:

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, August 19, 2021 11:22 AM

South end of the Southern Boulevard Line at 133rd Street and north end, on tracks shared by the "C" Bronx and Van Courtland Parks line, at Bronx Park Wesr and Fordham Road.   668 lost its oriignial trucks as applied to the 646-685 cars and now rides on trucks intended for the 626-645 Manhattsn cars, which got poles for Bronox service in April 1947, like 629 behind, now at Branford (www.shorelinetrolley.oorg).  All these cars were built in 1939 and were the last new streetcars for New York City.  (The Brooklyn PCCs came in 1936, and the second-hand New Bedford cars in 1947 for Queensboro Bridge.)

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, August 22, 2021 3:12 PM

Post deleted

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, August 23, 2021 11:18 AM

Post deleted

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, August 26, 2021 6:44 AM

Regarding above posts deleted..

There were incidents of catcher-ropes breaking in Brooklyn, old cars re-activated for WWII icreased riswersip and one line's restoration.  But 128. the entire 101-200, 391-400, and 6236-645 ex-Manhattan conduit cars received new trolley ropes.

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, August 26, 2021 7:01 AM

More Third Avenue Transit photos:

A Southern Blvd. car on Boston Road, north of the intersection with Southern Blvd. appraching West Farms Car House:

 

381 operating as a Bailey Avenue car:

Different day, as a Boston Road car:

Two of the same car on the siding adjacent to the West Farms Carhouse:

140 on Boston Road near the West Farms Car House:

352 at Southern Boulevard and--- E. 152nd St.?   E. 162nd St.?

 

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, August 26, 2021 8:09 PM

Ex-Manhattan 140 near West Farms Carhouse on Boston Road and ex-Ogden Avenue with bright sunlight and the elevated structure's shadows maximizing contrast:

 

A much earlier posting on this thread does show 140 as a Manhattan conduit car.

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, August 27, 2021 10:01 AM

Apologies for the duplicate photo.  But here are three more..  All three already  had photos posted, but in different locations and even in conduit service in Manhattan.  114 and 391 were originally conduit cars.  All three cars  were homebuilt lightweightds. built 1935-1936.

On Boston Road looking north south of the intersection where the 2 and 5 on the elevated structure turn from Southern Boulevard to Boston Road

Further south, looking south, on Boston Road

And here the B stands for Bailey Avenue, not Boston Road.  (TATS had  4 Bs, 2 Ts, 2 Vs, 2 Ss, 2As, and 7 Xs.) 

 

 

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Saturday, August 28, 2021 2:50 PM

Two more.  One aside West Farms carhouse, with an odd sign on Westchster Avenue , the A line, but I suppose this operator's assignment took him to the Tremont Avenue line, as well.  Consequently, the defaced dash sign.

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Posted by Overmod on Saturday, August 28, 2021 8:19 PM

I'd heard of that hell-bound train, but not this.

"He came awake with an anguished roar/And prayed and prayed on that barroom floor/And his prayers and vows were not in folly/For he never rode that hell-bound trolley"

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, September 6, 2021 3:01 AM

One technically good photo at Bronx Park West and Fordham Road, a Souther Boulevard car adjacent to the bus replacement of the Fordham - 207th St. Croostown.   And one that could be better on 125th Street looking west.

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, September 9, 2021 8:03 AM

Regarding the bend in 125th Street, Henry Raudenbush supplied this current map:

In the photo and my memory. La Salle went through to join 125th St.   St. Nicholas Ave. is a through street, 11th -168th Street, but it has lots of curves.

Note the signs of the switch removed the horsecar-then=battery line that b ranched off 125th using Hancock Place (w2as at one time Manhattenville vAvenue) and St. Nicholas Avenue to 110th Street, then East to 1st Avenue

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Saturday, September 11, 2021 4:48 PM

More 125th St., Martin Luther King Blvd., today.   Looking west, west of the bend, with the high station of the Broadway IRT in the background:

And the rear of a car from Marble Hill turning onto 3rd Avenue to reverse at a crossover, just south of the intersection, or to proceed south to the 65th Street Carhouse.

65th Street Carhouse interior:

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, October 1, 2021 6:46 AM

Jack May photo of 629 at Branford:

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, October 21, 2021 8:03 AM

After a short period in 1937, year of construction tn the 65th Street shop, when it was a conduit car in Manhattan, 381 ran with poles on Ogden Avenue, The Bronx (both ends of that route in Manhattan, W. 155th & Amsterdam Avenue and W. 181st & B'way) until Summer 1947.  Whenb that line went bus, it was on Boston Road, shoewn in  thne next two photos, before moving to Yonkers.

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, January 3, 2022 10:24 PM

Fan-trip car at Laake & Neperhan on the Lake Av. connector between the "5," Neperhan and "6" Tuckahoe Rd. Lines. 

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, January 4, 2022 11:01 AM

Picture taken a  few moments be fore the above picture;

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, January 7, 2022 2:37 AM

two more on Yonkers' Riverdale Avenue:

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Posted by daveklepper on Saturday, January 8, 2022 10:49 AM

from Henry Raudenbush:

Riverdale had more buildings of this type, but Riverdale was been turned into a dual highway by demolition of all the buildings on a least one side.
The dash sign “New Yok Express”  was a concoction of a group that was promoting the idea of turning the abandoned Getty Square branch of the NY Central Putnam Division into a light rail line, giving several of the TARS lines a reserved right of way from Getty Square, down to the Van Cortland subway terminal, parallel to local service on Broadway.  Warburton Ave would have been one of the possible connecting routes.

 

 

 

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, January 10, 2022 11:23 AM

The name of that organization was Metro Transit Club.  The upper photo is (I think) southbound on Neperhan Avenue, the "5" Line.  I thought the lower one was in New Rochelle on the loop cicling the downtown area, with a stop at the eralroad station, but I may be mistaken, and  it may be another Yonkers photograph.

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, January 12, 2022 11:38 AM

Corrections made to previous captions from tnformation from Henry Raudenbush

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, January 14, 2022 2:13 AM

Same location, south terminal nof Yonkers' Riverdale Avenue Line at the New York City Line, as the photo of regular "8" car 354 ear;ier.  At the north end of the line-up, looking south, fan-trip cars  371 and 327, with regular car 354 at the rear:

On the "6" Tuckahoe Road Line on Walnut Street just north of Yonkers Avenue, with Pond Road entering from the left.  Formerly, end of double track from Yonkers Avenue at this point.

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, January 16, 2022 7:33 AM

Note caption correction for preceding photo.

Here, the north end of the Tuskahoe Road Line at the New York Central Putnam Division station at the intersection of Tuckahoe Road and Railroad Avenue.  Anyone knoiw the name of the station?

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, January 17, 2022 4:19 AM

And one more Riverdale Avenue:

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Posted by rcdrye on Monday, January 17, 2022 11:12 AM

Just a guess but it looks like the station name was Dunwoodie (MP 8.09).

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, January 18, 2022 3:43 AM

Thanks!    Two on the northern oasrt of Warburton Avenue, the first of which may have already been posted much earlier.

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