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BOSTON PCC CARS

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, November 16, 2022 8:31 PM

Thanks!

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Posted by Pauley on Wednesday, November 16, 2022 4:14 PM

Great picture.

The Cities Service sign in the background is in Kenmore Square, close to Fenway Park. The famous CITGO sign replaced it in 1965. 

Yikes. I remember when it changed!

(Wow. That's a Crosley station wagon!)

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Posted by daveklepper on Saturday, November 5, 2022 1:39 PM

An attempt in improvement of the two Commonweakth Avenue photos:

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Posted by daveklepper on Saturday, November 5, 2022 11:50 AM

You are all correct.  I meant Northeastern and haver corrected the posting.   Truth is, in the some total of 19-20 years spent in the Boston-Cambrtidge area, I never once was inside Northeastern U.  Inside Symphony Hall, not far away, maybe 1000 times.  But I did hear excellant organ recitals on the very beautiful Aeolian Skinner organ at Northwestern (Alice Millard Chapel?).  The firm that I worked for 1957-1971, including three years at the Downerrs Grove Office, had been the acoustical advisors, although I was not directly involved. 

Thanks for the important correction.

Other photo and information contributions, comments, and questions requested.

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Posted by rcdrye on Saturday, November 5, 2022 10:33 AM

PCC streetcars got to Clark and Howard, on the Chicago/Evanston line, about 2 miles from Northwestern U.

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Saturday, November 5, 2022 10:13 AM

I would think so.  The closest that any PCC cars got to Northwestern University was on CTA's Evanston Line, now known as the Purple Line.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by MidlandMike on Friday, November 4, 2022 6:56 PM

I'm guessing that in the last post with photos, by Northwestern University you actually meant Northeastern University?

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, November 4, 2022 4:03 AM

Photos added to previous posting.

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, July 14, 2022 9:32 PM

Caption on pewvious post corrected.

And I'm editing this post to showe some of the Boston Subway's portals:

Between Haymarket Square and North Station

Treemont Street and Broadway:

Huntington Avenue, near Northeastern University:

Commonweaklth Avenue at Blanton Street

(More work required on these two, apologies)

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, July 14, 2022 2:15 PM

A very typical ruuf-fan-added "waerime" PCC just overhauled at Everett Shops, Sept. 2949:

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, November 11, 2021 1:35 AM

On Commonwealth Avenue, at the west switch to the Braves Field Loop, looking west toward "Packard's Corner:"

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, October 24, 2021 3:54 AM

A rare viusit of asn all-electric to Watertown bC.H., Spring, 1950 fan trip.

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, July 28, 2021 6:23 AM

Correction, Oak Square is in Allston, not Brighton.  Should have remembered, since the Oak Square Loop was the north terminal of the Allston - Dudley streetcar line, that even before WWII, Boston Elevated converted to bus, with the thought of eventually converting all streetcar lines that did not have extensive PRW and/or ran into the Subway.  WWII stopped the program, and only after the MTA, now MBTA, took over that it reumed, also converting with lines the Elevated had planned to retain.

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, July 25, 2021 11:08 AM

"Wartime" PCCs on the Park Street - Watertown line, starting with the short-turn loop at Oak Square, Brighton:

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, May 27, 2021 3:17 AM

When the Riverside Line (former Boston and Albany Highland Branch) was PCC-operated.    Sunday photos, weekdays had 2- and 3-car PCC trains:

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, March 16, 2021 3:28 PM

Boston got its first PCC, St. Louis-built 3001, in 1937.  There has not been a year without PCC operation for 84 years!

All other PCCs were from Pullman.

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, March 16, 2021 3:15 PM

More John Aurelius Mattapan - Ashmont color photos, 1st at Mattapan:

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, March 15, 2021 7:02 AM

Typical on-line scenery:

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, March 15, 2021 6:45 AM

Milton Station on the Mattapan - Ashmont "High-Speed" Line

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, September 1, 2020 8:11 AM

Here is 3005 again, here at Matapan.  Based at Arborway. during non-rush-hours it could be used on Arborway (Forest Hills) - Matapam via Cummings Highway, or on the Charles River Loop line, but during rush hours it was needed on Eggleston - North Station via Tremont Street and the Subway.

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, August 19, 2020 7:26 PM

Atthe Arborway, in 1950, one  of the 25 non-MU 1941 Pullman-built cars assigned N. Sta. - Eggleston, via the Subway and Tremont Av.  Later made MU.  Note the silver-colored wings each side of the headlight, only on 3000 - 3025.

An all-electric 1945 Pullman-built non-MU approaching Andrew Station on its non-rush-hour assignment City Point - Dudley Station.  During rush-hour, all 25 all-electrics were assigned to North Station - City Point.

  

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, August 18, 2020 12:59 AM

Single PCCs to Lechemere were rare on weeldays, with two-car and three-car trains normal.  But Sundays did see regular single-car operation:

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, August 16, 2020 9:05 AM

A better scan of the previous photo (??, you be thev judge) and a Center-Entrance train entering the arrivals' side of Lechmere Station:

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, August 14, 2020 9:48 AM

lPCC's at the currenntly under-demolition Lechemere Station and viaduct incline, to be replaced by new facilities nearby enabling the exctention adjacent to B&M tracks to Sommervile and Medford.

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, March 6, 2016 9:13 AM

But 629 has been repaired from Sandy damage and is back in service, for those Branford operators that like the Third Avenue (and Ombaha-Council Bluffs) foot pedal release to apply. depress to release and engage the line switch and shut the doors, brake system.   I liked it, learned to operate streetcars on that basis at age 15 in 1947 on The Bronx's Bailey Avenue Line, a one-car operation on a double-track line with little auto traffic and freindly Irish operators.  Lightweights and second-handers had already replaced a Brill convertable on that line because of the conversion of other lines.  So 629 was may favorite at Branford, 1970-1995, often with an ex-Third Avenue operator, Robert Marcus, may he rest in peace, as my operating partner.   What is particularly nice about this safety-brake system is the ease with which you can safely and slowly close in on another car in a car-house to maximize track capacity.  You simply leave the K controler in the first notch and then depress the foot pedal to inch up to the car ahead, knowing that you can stop instantly simply by removing your foot.  So I could leave the car with only two inches separating the car with confidence that actual contact would be avoided.  We always chocked cars when leaving them, not relying solely on the handbrake.

40 cars from the 626-685 series went to Vienna.  They were used on the Floresdorf suburban lines (31,32, 33), which had the necessary wider clearances.  A pantograph in the cennter of the roof replaced the two trolley poles, and all four doors were made double-leaf, only operator control, no treadle exit at the rear.  629 was converted back to Third Avenue arraangements, not sure about Capitol's. Crich ini England retains the Vienna door arrangement or did until recently.  Went to Vienna primarily to see and ride them in 1960 on my way to Israel, not noing I would ride and run one again at Branford.  (Also in Vienna heard Von Karajan conduct Beeethoven's 9th in the Grosser Musikvereinsalle, and hard to way which exprience was more important to me at the time.)

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Posted by rcdrye on Thursday, March 3, 2016 2:59 PM

A fair number of TARS cars were sent to Europe under the Marshall Plan.. Of these, 629 (Branford CT) and 631 (Seashore) have been repatriated from Vienna, Austria and restored to New York configuration.  631 is out of service with worn bearings at the moment.

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, March 3, 2016 10:43 AM

Rather than start a new thread, with considerable interest in the Boston situation, I thought I would share my knowledge of home-built Third Avenue Railway - Third Avenue Transit home-built lightweight streetcars.

1935-1936:  101-150, higher arch roof end doors, conduit, built largely from retired single-truck battery cars spliced together.   WWII assignments T, 3rd and Amsterdam, K (Kingsboridge) 125th, Amsterdam and Broadway, 10th Avenue weekends, B Broadway-42nd Street peak service weekdays.

1936:  151-200:  Low,typical arch roof, end dorrs, conduit, also built largely from single-truck cars spliced together, assingments as above.

1937: 301-400  Built mostly of new material, patterened closely after 151-200, but trolley-poles, first cars equipped with dynamic brakes in addition to air.  Handling almosr all Westchester County service (Yonkers, Mt. Vernon, Pelham, New Rochelle, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 (two cars), 9 (one car), A) plus O Ogden Avenue in The Bronx, with its steep grades and requiring only five cars.  A few of the 390's were equipped with conduit and suplemented the 101's on their routes.

1936:   551, Brill-built, aluminum, Peter Witt doors, conduit, exit door opposite, conduit, headlining and PCC-Brilliner lighting, not bare wood ceiling and exposed light bulbs like the rest, dynamic brakes as well as air.  B Broadway 42 St.

1937-1938:  552-600   Home-made, copies of 551 except exit doors staggered one-window toward right-hand rear of car. B Broadway 42nd Street

1938:  601-625.   Same, except thinner steel replaced aluminum, with two corrigations in the sides for added strength.  Also B Broadway 42nd  Were not scrapped but went to Sao Paulo Brazil, and some are preserved, one running on narrow gauge in a Brazil trolley museum.

1939: 626-645   Similar to 301-400, but like 551-625, a somewhat smoother front with slight skirting matching the step. Conduit    special trucks with rubber employed for noise and vibration control   X 59th Street Crosstown, passing several hospitals.  Also used on X 42nd Street Crosstown on Sundays only.

1939:  646-685   Same, except trolleypole.   S Sourthern Boulevard and T Treemont and Burnside Avenues

Although basically steel or aluminum cars, all had wood and canvass roofs.  All had Brill E-177-pattern trucks, except 626-645, using parts from Brill and pieces of Brill Maximum-Traction trucks off scrapped cars welded together. 626-645 trucks were similar, but rubber blocks replaced steel springs.  Alll were four-motored, mostly 35HP motors. All were double-end, used the Third Avenue - Omaha foot release pressure to apply brake interlocked with the line-switch for a "dead-man" feature, and also interlocked with the doors, so pressing the pedal to the floor both engaged the line-switch and closed the doors.  

Other lines used the 1201-1290(?) sereis of second-hand lightweights, none were condouit, including double-truck Birneys on W Webster-White Plains Avenue, wider than the rest of the fleet and restricted to that line; and the 01-100 and 201-300 straight-side Brill convertables and 851-1100 curved-side convertables, not all numbers present, some scrapped already.   The second-hand lightweights were 4-motored, the Convertables two-motored with masxium-traction trucks.  The B Mt. Vernon - Subway line was a Westchester exception using some straight-side convertables.  All stright-side convertables had trolleypoles, but 01-100 had conduit as well.  The curved-sides came in all three power configurations and seemed to be random as to whicih had what.   The 149th Street crosstown used a plow-pit and required cars with both power systems.  Manhattan lines using curved-side condouit-only convertables were 42nd and 125th Street Crosstowns and 10th Avenue.

The convertables assigned to Classon Point, V, had field shunts for higher speed, unusual for two-motored cars.   Don't remember the numbers.   Only five cars.

With the safety feature, all operations were with one-man cars.  

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, March 2, 2016 1:23 PM

And their Indiana Railway, the Magic Interurban

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, March 2, 2016 1:22 PM

I should point out that I used publications of the Boston Street Railway Association to confirm and supplement my memory in providing this data.  Particularly the excellent books by Bradley Clarke, Hub Streetcars, 1940-1950, and The MTA`Era. These books are of similar quality to the excellent CERA North Shore and Milwaukee streetcar books.

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