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Classic Railroad Quiz (at least 50 years old).

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Posted by rcdrye on Wednesday, August 24, 2022 11:38 AM

This New England railroad lost its "navy" in 1915, after the Panama Canal Act went into effect.  Name both company names used on the boats.

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Posted by rcdrye on Wednesday, August 24, 2022 11:42 AM

The Washington Baltimore & Annapolis Railway used DC's conduit tracks to reach its mid-city terminals.  Name the other DC area interurban that also had conduit-equipped cars.

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, August 26, 2022 8:25 AM

I was not aware that the Washington and Old Dominion ever operated through into downtown Washington.  I thought it always terminated in Rosslyn, and one transferred  to a Capital Traction/Transit car to actually enter Washington.  If they ever did enter Washington, then they had conduit-equipped cars.

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Posted by rcdrye on Friday, August 26, 2022 10:08 AM

W&OD did terminate in Rosslyn.  There was another company involved before DC cars took over the W&OD connection that also served a very famous location.

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, August 28, 2022 7:00 AM

Must have been a thrd unterurban that ran to Mount Vernon, George Washington's Virginia home.  I'll come back with the name.

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, August 28, 2022 7:05 AM

Washihngton, Arlington, and Mt. Vernon Electridc Railway

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, September 18, 2022 11:11 AM

Should I now ask the next question?

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Posted by rcdrye on Sunday, September 18, 2022 11:47 AM

Go ahead

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, September 18, 2022 2:30 PM

Name at least twu North American systems that comverted 2-man centwe-door cars to one-man fronf-entrance cars, and at least two that kept center-door cars as such, conductot required, through and after WWII. 

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Posted by rcdrye on Wednesday, September 21, 2022 11:08 AM

The center door to front entrance was a fairly common conversion, as was a rear-entrance to front-entrance change.  Gary Railways (Indiana) and Milwaukee had some such conversions.  Boston and Cleveland carried center-entrance cars (conductor required) on their rosters until after WWII, though Cleveland's saw relatively little use in later years. Twin Cities converted a fair number of rear-entrance (Gate) cars to air-operated front-entrance cars.  Chicago had postwar PCCs set up as one-man, two-man and convertible, though the last line in Chicago retained conductors to the end of streetcar service.

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, September 22, 2022 11:01 AM

By all means ask the next question.  But what i had  in mund was:

Continued operation as conductor required center-door:  Boston that you mentioned and Red Arrow (Philly-suburban).  Note that both properties used them in trains, with only the conuctor required in the second and any possible third car.

Converted to one-man, with front entrance:  Brooklyn (5000 and 5100 series) and West Penn.

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Posted by rcdrye on Thursday, September 22, 2022 4:53 PM

This railroad's electric district had locomotives using three distinctly different types of transmission.  The newest two types could MU.

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, September 23, 2022 3:07 AM

New York New Haven and Hartford:

EP-1 - EP-4 AC-commutator motors also running on DC.  Likewise Ef-1 and EF-3.

EP-2 and one switcher, rotary converter with DC tracdtion motors.

EP-5 and ex Virginian and N&W EF-4, rectifiers and DC traction moitors

In addition to the EP-5s and RF-4s, the EP-1s and EF-1s also could MU and usually did.  An EF-3 was equal to three EF-1s.  The EF-3s were New England's most powerful locomotives and some had boilers and also handled passenger trains into Penn Station.  (But not Grand Central Terminal)

Nu "EF" had DC third rail capability.  All the "EP" units did.

The EP-4, EP-5. anf EF-3 had streamlining.

All electrics were double-ended with controls at both ends, except the EF-4s, which had typical road-switcher-like bodies.

Regarding power transmission to locolmotives, this railroad had some overhead 600V DC early branch-line electrifications.  The 1901 Stamford - New Canaan one was converted to be compatible eithy the 11000V AC of the main line.  The railroad also used the New York Central's under-running 600V-DC Woodlawen p- Grand Central Terminal.

The Pennsylvasnia Railroad.

Manhhattanh Transfer's last days, with over-running 600V DC third rail into Penn Station, and its continued use Journal Square - Newark PRR - H&M joint service co-existed with the first Philadelphia-area 11000V suburbam electrifications and its overhead-wire 600V DC Camden - Atlantic City electrification, that  was cut back Camden - Glastonbery?) by PRSL.

And at one time or another PRR employed DC motors with DC transmission, AC-commutator motors, general freight and passdenger power and MUs, DC motors with rectifiers off AC, freight power and Silverliners and Metroliners MUs, and rotary converters, the ex-Great Northerns used as pushers.

All MUs (of course). all passenger power, no switchers, freight power with the exception of the ex-GNs when on PRR, could MU between same types.

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, September 23, 2022 3:22 AM

deleted

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Posted by rcdrye on Saturday, September 24, 2022 6:58 AM

I rpobably should have excluded PRR, though it certainly met the criterea (DD1's being the kicker - all of the MU stuff didn't fit the question).

Virginian had "split-phase' Squareheads, motor-generator EL-2Bs and rectifier EL-C's for a short time.

Feel free to ask the next question.

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Posted by Overmod on Saturday, September 24, 2022 12:57 PM

The PRR qualifies for reasons you didn't mention.

1) L5pdw or whatever the straight AC unit was (the one that had one or two pans at different times.  Big Liz didn't really count.

2)P5, GG1, DD2, and prospective classes for the wartime extension were quill drive with multiple-tap control.

3)Rectifier types of a couple of flavors (E2 and the E44s) that retained multiple-notch control for MU capability... (I do not include the ex- Virginian engines that became the E-33s because I don't remember their MU setup; I do NOT remember ever seeing them MUed to anything but themselves...)

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Posted by rcdrye on Saturday, September 24, 2022 6:56 PM

EL-2Bs and EL-Cs (E33s) could multiple with each other, though there's no record of it actually happening that I have found.

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, September 25, 2022 3:29 AM

Two wooden elevated cars that are existing were rebuilt with important changes four times.  The tracks where operated also four (possibly more)

Major ownership:  One major change. two minor changes.

On one occasion, possibly more, not including initial delivery over 100 years ago, their wheels did cinyacy the tracks of railroads with freight service.

Definitely the oldest operable cars on the system.

Name the cars and the changes.

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, September 25, 2022 3:48 AM

Answering Overmold. my recollection is that PRR did restrict MUing only to same types, even distinguishing between GG1s with different gear ratios.   The exception was with O-1s and P-5s.                                                                           .

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