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Buried Steam Locomotive, Mid West Flood Victem

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Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, January 26, 2008 5:50 PM
Has the 4076 ever been located?  If not, it would seem that locating it would be easy.  It sure would be interesting to recover it.
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Posted by Dr Leonard on Thursday, January 24, 2008 9:10 PM
The still-buried AT&SF 2-8-2 in the Kaw River is said to be No. 4076.
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Posted by SSW9389 on Thursday, January 24, 2008 7:55 AM

The July 1951 Kaw River flood is documented in the Warbonnet Second Quarter 2001 issue. There is a photo of Santa Fe 2-6-2 #1035 being cut up in the Kaw River bottom in October 1955 after a drought revealed its location.

My folks witnessed this flood first hand as my father was stationed at Fort Riley and was involved in sandbagging various places on the post.

 

 Bucyrus wrote:
I have read about this, and will try to find it in my records.  Off the top of my head, I recall there are two ATSF locomotives that were lost in a river flood--maybe in Kansas??  One was a 2-8-2, and one of the two was never found.  The one that was found was partially cut up for scrap during a period of low water.  There are others here and there, lost under a variety of circumstances.

COTTON BELT: Runs like a Blue Streak!
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Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, January 22, 2008 7:54 PM
I have read about this, and will try to find it in my records.  Off the top of my head, I recall there are two ATSF locomotives that were lost in a river flood--maybe in Kansas??  One was a 2-8-2, and one of the two was never found.  The one that was found was partially cut up for scrap during a period of low water.  There are others here and there, lost under a variety of circumstances.
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Posted by arkansasrailfan on Tuesday, January 22, 2008 2:06 PM
I smell restoration projects.....(sniff-sniff)
-Michael It's baaaacccckkkk!!!!!! www.youtube.com/user/wyomingrailfan
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Posted by AltonFan on Monday, January 21, 2008 5:09 PM
I remember a similar story set in Pennsylvania, in which a PRR I-1 Decapod, its boiler and tender ballasted with water, was dumped into a steam to hold back a flood.  IIRC, it didn't work.

Dan

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Posted by cnwfan51 on Monday, January 21, 2008 11:14 AM
I remember the ATSF doing the samw  thing in Mo during the floods of 1993 to dave a bridge and It didnt work that time either   Larry
larry ackerman
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Posted by SSW9389 on Monday, January 21, 2008 11:07 AM
You may be remembering the 1951 Great Flood in Kansas. Santa Fe did something like you described to save a bridge.  
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Buried Steam Locomotive, Mid West Flood Victem
Posted by TrolleySparks on Sunday, January 20, 2008 6:16 PM

Does anyone remember the steam locomotive found buried in the corn field?  (USA Midwest)  What ever happened to it?

The article appeared in Trains Magazine from the 80s or early 90s.  The story told, In the late 1940's a major flood threatened the region including the local rail road bridge.  The railroad loaded the bridge with surplus equipment (old steam locos and other rolling stock) in a vain effort to save it from the rising food waters.  All were lost when the bridge fell and that was the end of the story.  Until someone found one of the locomotives buried in the dirt.  There was a great photo of some one standing over a shallow 10 x 10 pit reveling a drive wheel and siderod.  This was a very large steam locomotive, like a Northern.  I thought this was the Santa Fe RR, Mississippi or Missouri river but don't remember and can't find the article.  I am sure it was USA Midwest/Mississippi area.  Thanks.

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