Cal Z Charger test train hits truck

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Cal Z Charger test train hits truck
Posted by blue streak 1 on Thursday, February 20, 2020 3:17 PM

East of Reno train hit a ready mix truck.  Truck must have been empty as it was turned over and Charger not too much damage but enough that UP sending relief. Two Amtrak employees hurt probably engineer and another ?

https://www.icloud.com/photos/#0eZ3QTqpEt-X93QlYUXShV5bA

Charger damage

https://www.icloud.com/photos/#0pa3FjPNnzU67LOk8mmbyPwCg

We may need to start pushing congress to supply additional funds to get about 20 extra Chargers.  It seems that this carnage on Amtrak locos is not oing to stop.

Will this one just go on to Sacremento so Siemens can fix it ? 

 

Can others get more details ?

 

 

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Posted by NorthWest on Thursday, February 20, 2020 5:59 PM

I think that was 5, the in-service California Zephyr. It left Chicago on the 18th with two back-to-back Chargers and a P42, along with en extra baggage car.

The testing's working; this is part of the standard LD experience...

Hope the crew recovers soon.

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Posted by BaltACD on Thursday, February 20, 2020 6:15 PM

blue streak 1
Charger damage

https://www.icloud.com/photos/#0pa3FjPNnzU67LOk8mmbyPwCg

We may need to start pushing congress to supply additional funds to get about 20 extra Chargers.  It seems that this carnage on Amtrak locos is not oing to stop.

Will this one just go on to Sacremento so Siemens can fix it ? 

 

Can others get more details ?

Safe-lite should be able to repair the glass damage and a roll or two of duct tape and it will be good to go.Dots - Sign

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Posted by Trainzguy2472 on Thursday, February 20, 2020 7:07 PM

Why does it seem like Amtrak trains hit more vehicles/people/etc. than freight trains?  Is it because drivers aren't expecting trains to come through that fast (freight trains are usually more speed-restricted than passenger), or that the media just gives passenger train accidents more attention?  Either way, seems like some people are too stupid to cross train tracks safely.

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Posted by SD70Dude on Thursday, February 20, 2020 7:23 PM

Trainzguy2472

Why does it seem like Amtrak trains hit more vehicles/people/etc. than freight trains?  Is it because drivers aren't expecting trains to come through that fast (freight trains are usually more speed-restricted than passenger), or that the media just gives passenger train accidents more attention?  Either way, seems like some people are too stupid to cross train tracks safely.

Passenger train accidents give a whole herd of people a front-row seat to the carnage.  In today's world of social media the news spreads fast, and gets picked up by 'mainstream' outlets. 

Numerous crossing accidents involving freight trains happen each and every day in North America alone.  They are common enough that they are about as interesting to the News as a single-fatality car accident. 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, February 20, 2020 8:41 PM

'Dude, you hit the nail on the head.  A good corollary is ship sinkings.  Plenty of ocean-going cargo vessels are lost each year but their loss attracts little or no attention, super-tankers excepted.

It's only the passenger ship mishaps and disasters that attract attention.  Think Costa Concordia.  

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Posted by matthewsaggie on Thursday, February 20, 2020 9:02 PM

Costa Concordia- now there was a case of vetting, training and supervision-- not.

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, February 20, 2020 9:32 PM

matthewsaggie

Costa Concordia- now there was a case of vetting, training and supervision-- not.

 

Old mariners rule, "If you can see it, it's too close!  Unless it's the destination."

"Captain Crunch" Schettino forgot that, or never learned it to begin with. 

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Posted by Leo_Ames on Friday, February 21, 2020 12:07 PM

I wonder if it's even fixable. Looks pretty minor, but that was a pretty substantial truck that it hit and as we've seen several times in the 2000's with modern passenger power in the US, looks can be deceiving where structual integrity is concerned. 

I'm no engineer, but how these machines are built to absorb energy to protect the crew and their monocoque design means it's not always obvious from the ground when they've been tweaked too much to be viewed as having an adequate margin of safety to absorb energy and protect the crew in the next big impact.  

I doubt this one has too much to worry about, but you never know. 

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Posted by Electroliner 1935 on Friday, February 21, 2020 6:06 PM

It might depend on whether the concrete truck was loaded or empty at the time of the collision. It will be interesting to see how the electronics and the prime mover handled the sudden deceleration. At least the train remained on the rails. A case of the immovable object meeting the irresistible force? Glad the crew survived. 

 

As Northwest stated, there were two Chargers plus a P42 as seen in this video. 

https://www.kolotv.com/content/news/minor-injuries-reported-in-train-vs-cement-truck-crash-on-i-80-568047281.html

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Posted by jeffhergert on Friday, February 21, 2020 8:59 PM

SD70Dude

 

 
Trainzguy2472

Why does it seem like Amtrak trains hit more vehicles/people/etc. than freight trains?  Is it because drivers aren't expecting trains to come through that fast (freight trains are usually more speed-restricted than passenger), or that the media just gives passenger train accidents more attention?  Either way, seems like some people are too stupid to cross train tracks safely.

 

 

Passenger train accidents give a whole herd of people a front-row seat to the carnage.  In today's world of social media the news spreads fast, and gets picked up by 'mainstream' outlets. 

Numerous crossing accidents involving freight trains happen each and every day in North America alone.  They are common enough that they are about as interesting to the News as a single-fatality car accident. 

 

While any train can be involved, I've noticed something on our line across Iowa.  It's not scientific by any means, just an observation.  Many times when there's a grade crossing accident, it's often one of our Z trains that's involved.

The Z trains, like passenger trains, usually are running a lot faster than most others.  I think part of the reason is people are expecting a slower train, thinking they can beat it and then find out they can't.

I'm sure there's a lot of truth that a passenger train accident gets noticed.  But casual observation makes me think the train's speed also plays into it.

Jeff 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, February 21, 2020 10:04 PM

Have any of you noticed a phenomenon that I've noticed?  That is, looking at the headlight on an oncoming train, how it just seems to hang there, and hang there, and hang there, looking like it's not moving, and then WHAM it's right on top of you?

I think this is something that people should be made aware of, especially in Driver's Ed classes.  "Don't assume anything as far as the speed of an approaching train is concerned, it's coming faster than you think it is!"

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Posted by BaltACD on Friday, February 21, 2020 10:26 PM

Flintlock76
Have any of you noticed a phenomenon that I've noticed?  That is, looking at the headlight on an oncoming train, how it just seems to hang there, and hang there, and hang there, looking like it's not moving, and then WHAM it's right on top of you?

I think this is something that people should be made aware of, especially in Driver's Ed classes.  "Don't assume anything as far as the speed of an approaching train is concerned, it's coming faster than you think it is!"

That is the phenomena that ditch lights were supposedly the cure for.

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Saturday, February 22, 2020 6:44 AM

Part of the situation is that it's almost impossible to determine approximate speed from a single headlight coming directly at the viewer.  There is little to no visible motion.  Ditch lights help but only when the train is fairly close.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by charlie hebdo on Saturday, February 22, 2020 12:24 PM

True and it's another reason why grade crossings are especially dangerous at night

 

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Posted by zugmann on Saturday, February 22, 2020 3:54 PM

Flintlock76
Have any of you noticed a phenomenon that I've noticed?  That is, looking at the headlight on an oncoming train, how it just seems to hang there, and hang there, and hang there, looking like it's not moving, and then WHAM it's right on top of you?

It's like watching a jet come in to a landing head-on.  Looks like it's barely moving.  

Power of perspective? 

 

 

 The opinions expressed here represent my own and not those of my employer or any other railroad, company, or person.

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Saturday, February 22, 2020 4:00 PM

zugmann

 

 
Flintlock76
Have any of you noticed a phenomenon that I've noticed?  That is, looking at the headlight on an oncoming train, how it just seems to hang there, and hang there, and hang there, looking like it's not moving, and then WHAM it's right on top of you?

 

It's like watching a jet come in to a landing head-on.  Looks like it's barely moving.  

Power of perspective? 

 

 

 

Maybe.  I can't explain the phenomenon, but I know it exists having experienced it myself.  And no, ditch lights don't seem to make much of a difference, except for calling a little more attention to the fact a train's coming.  

Another thing that impresses me, and that more people should be made aware of is, depending on terrain, just how silently  a train can approach.  Scary.

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Posted by BaltACD on Saturday, February 22, 2020 6:04 PM

Flintlock76
Another thing that impresses me, and that more people should be made aware of is, depending on terrain, just how silently  a train can approach.  Scary.

And remember - the manufacturers have been making conscious efforts to make locomotives even quieter over the years.

In my Maryland home I am about 1/2 a mile from CSX's Old Main Line.  I hear trains sounding for the two local road crossings - I rarely hear them 'working the grade'.  Westbounds are climbing, Eastbounds descending and with coal or other bulk commodity trains will be using dynamic brakes.

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Posted by SD70Dude on Saturday, February 22, 2020 6:14 PM

charlie hebdo

True and it's another reason why grade crossings are especially dangerous at night

This is why locomotives and cars all have reflective striping on their sides.  Because of multiple incidents where vehicles drove into the side of moving trains at level crossings without automatic warning devices.

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Saturday, February 22, 2020 6:53 PM

BaltACD

 

 
Flintlock76
Another thing that impresses me, and that more people should be made aware of is, depending on terrain, just how silently  a train can approach.  Scary.

 

And remember - the manufacturers have been making conscious efforts to make locomotives even quieter over the years.

In my Maryland home I am about 1/2 a mile from CSX's Old Main Line.  I hear trains sounding for the two local road crossings - I rarely hear them 'working the grade'.  Westbounds are climbing, Eastbounds descending and with coal or other bulk commodity trains will be using dynamic brakes.

 

Interesting.  I live about a mile-and-a-half, maybe two as the crow flies, from the CSX James River Line, the old "Loads east, empties west" coal road.  Position wise the house faces the line at about 90 degrees, so the trains go "past" but not straight at us.  I can hear them blow for grade crossings, and can hear the rumble of the cars, but can't hear the locomotives at all.  

I should add whether I hear the trains or not depends on the time of day.  At night and if it's quiet, yes.  During the day, no, unless it's early morning.

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Posted by Paul of Covington on Saturday, February 22, 2020 9:12 PM

Flintlock76
Another thing that impresses me, and that more people should be made aware of is, depending on terrain, just how silently a train can approach. Scary.

   A good argument for steam.

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Posted by Overmod on Saturday, February 22, 2020 9:23 PM

Paul of Covington
A good argument for steam.

Modern roller-bearing steam drifting downhill with proper steam or drifting-valve setting can be quieter than an idling diesel-electric, and certainly quieter than a locomotive in dynamic braking.

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Saturday, February 22, 2020 10:08 PM

Overmod

 

 
Paul of Covington
A good argument for steam.

 

Modern roller-bearing steam drifting downhill with proper steam or drifting-valve setting can be quieter than an idling diesel-electric, and certainly quieter than a locomotive in dynamic braking.

 

True.  Personal experience, I was in Roanoke back in the 90's for a Norfolk-Southern steam excursion and Mighty 611 drifted past where we were standing.  I was amazed at how quiet it was when it wasn't working hard.

Just a gentle "woosh-woosh-woosh" as it rolled past.  

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Sunday, February 23, 2020 6:46 AM

When UP 4014 was enroute to West Chicago, my daughter-in-law mentioned how quiet it was as it passed through Elmhurst.  It's also hard to be much quieter than a set of MU cars, something I observed quite early with the South Shore.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul

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