Talgo

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  • Member since
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Talgo
Posted by zaleski on Saturday, November 04, 2017 1:28 PM

I recently used the Talgo service between Seattle and Portland.  There was a high level of offensive sound coming from the engine and/or the talgo equipment.  The sound level made travel in the car nearest the locomotive impossible for me.  I moved to mid-train and found the noise level much lower.  What is the cause of this situation and what can remove the problem. 

In the past I understood Talgo trains could increase speed by 20% over conventional equipment.  This is not the case with the Oregon-Washington Talgoes. The schedule is only a few minutes faster. 

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, November 05, 2017 10:33 AM

How was the ride quallity?

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Posted by JPS1 on Sunday, November 05, 2017 7:20 PM

daveklepper
 How was the ride quallity? 

I cannot nor do I mean to speak for Zaleski, but I rode the Talgo from Seattle to Portland and back two years ago.  I found the ride to be a bit tinny.  It did not seem as sure footed at Amtrak's standard equipment.

Rio Grande Valley, CFI,CFII

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Posted by zaleski on Monday, November 27, 2017 1:51 PM

More on the Talgo Train in the Northwest.  The cars are beautifully outfitted: excellent co-ordinated colors on seats walls floors.  The seats with adequate leg room are comfortable and nicely covered.  The bisto car was stunning with a curved service bar and a few seats/tables as well as a night sky ceiling.  Large windows benefit passengers throughout the train.  The ride quality was good. 

And now two problems: the noise level coming from the engine and/or the talgo apparatus was quite high.  In the last car, next to the engine, where my seat was, the operating noise level made it impossible for me to be in the car.  I moved to the bisto car where the noise level was better.  I ended in a mid-train car were the noise level was acceptable.  Secondly the train was not operating at speeds significantly faster than regular Amtrak equipment on the route.  Operating at 20% faster or more on existing railroads was the promise of the Talgo.   Faster speeds would make many routes feasible for trains where cities are separated by 300 miles or less. What I experienced on the Talgo would not produce that faster train promise.  The unacceptable operating noise problem can and must be identified and solved.  Who knows about the speed issue. 

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Posted by NorthWest on Monday, November 27, 2017 3:29 PM

Talgos can operate 20% faster on curves than conventional passenger cars, but at the same speed on tangent track due to the 79 MPH speed restriction without automatic train stop.

When superliners are substituted for Talgos, the schedule must be lengthened.

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Posted by BaltACD on Monday, November 27, 2017 3:36 PM

zaleski
More on the Talgo Train in the Northwest.  The cars are beautifully outfitted: excellent co-ordinated colors on seats walls floors.  The seats with adequate leg room are comfortable and nicely covered.  The bisto car was stunning with a curved service bar and a few seats/tables as well as a night sky ceiling.  Large windows benefit passengers throughout the train.  The ride quality was good. 

And now two problems: the noise level coming from the engine and/or the talgo apparatus was quite high.  In the last car, next to the engine, where my seat was, the operating noise level made it impossible for me to be in the car.  I moved to the bisto car where the noise level was better.  I ended in a mid-train car were the noise level was acceptable.  Secondly the train was not operating at speeds significantly faster than regular Amtrak equipment on the route.  Operating at 20% faster or more on existing railroads was the promise of the Talgo.   Faster speeds would make many routes feasible for trains where cities are separated by 300 miles or less. What I experienced on the Talgo would not produce that faster train promise.  The unacceptable operating noise problem can and must be identified and solved.  Who knows about the speed issue. 

One problem diesel powered Amtraks of all varieties is the operation of the diesel engine that supplies HEP.  That engine has to run at a elevated RPM in order for the generator/alternator that it is attached to to develop the necessary electric power for the train.  

Engine crews hated the F40PH's as they always had to have the diesel operating at a RPM range equivalent to about 6th notch so that HEP could be provided - even when 6th notch pulling power was not necessary.  No matter the locomotive, increased RPM's are required to develop HEP and increased RPM's generate increased noise levels.

My observation is that in operations other than the Talgo operation some form of 'non-revenue' car is usually coupled to the engines and next to the first occupied revenue car. 

         

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

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Posted by NorthWest on Monday, November 27, 2017 4:05 PM

The F59PHIs do have sepparate head end power generators, but the Genesis family does not, and there have been more of those than EMDs lately. The Talgo sets do have a HEP generator in one end car as well (the other is baggage) which is generally only used if needed as it can be loud.

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Posted by Electroliner 1935 on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 6:40 PM

The new Siemens's SC-44 Charger has inverter supplied 60 Hz hotel power and the speed of the diesel prime mover does not have to run at an RPM 60 HZ multiple such as 900 or 1200. The prime mover powers an alternator that is then converted to DC which feeds multiple inverters that provide variable frequency three phase power to the propulsion motors, and the hotel power inverter which provides 60 HZ three phase 480 volt for the train. The NEC Sieman's Electric Chargers have similar inverters that are fed from the overhead cat.  

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Posted by aegrotatio on Monday, December 04, 2017 9:39 PM

That makes me wonder why everyone doesn't use inverters, but then I remembered that conventional inverters were not very efficient and generate a lot of heat.  Are modern inverters much more efficient?  How much is this related to the breakthroughs in AC propulsion over the past 30 years?

 

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