Updated Acela Replacement news and pics

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Updated Acela Replacement news and pics
Posted by longhorn1969 on Saturday, October 07, 2017 11:43 PM

http://www.phillymag.com/news/2017/10/06/amtrak-new-trains/

 

The next gen trains will still be called Acela.

 

 

 

 

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Posted by oltmannd on Sunday, October 08, 2017 10:23 AM

Not too bad!  Glad the lines flow with the train's length and aren't splotches and diagonals...

-Don (Random stuff, mostly about trains - what else? http://blerfblog.blogspot.com/

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Posted by Overmod on Sunday, October 08, 2017 11:22 AM

Just wish it didn’t look so much like a demon Donald Duck with 5 o’clock shadow.

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Posted by Miningman on Sunday, October 08, 2017 1:01 PM

Heh heh...good one Overmod. You are right!

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Posted by Firelock76 on Sunday, October 08, 2017 4:48 PM

New Acela's already?  Why can't they make 'em last as long as a GG1?

Something's wrong here, especially with all we know now.

And you know something, it DOES look like a demon Donald Duck with a five o'clock shadow!

Where's Capitaine Raymond Lowey now that we need him?

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Posted by oltmannd on Monday, October 09, 2017 8:59 AM

Overmod

Just wish it didn’t look so much like a demon Donald Duck with 5 o’clock shadow.

 

Thanks for that!  Sad  Now I can't unsee it!

-Don (Random stuff, mostly about trains - what else? http://blerfblog.blogspot.com/

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Posted by oltmannd on Monday, October 09, 2017 9:01 AM

Firelock76
New Acela's already?  Why can't they make 'em last as long as a GG1?

New ones are lighter weight and higher capacity and paid for with net revenue from existing Acela service.  

The shame is that the existing Acela coaches can't be downgrade and kept for regional service.

-Don (Random stuff, mostly about trains - what else? http://blerfblog.blogspot.com/

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Posted by blue streak 1 on Monday, October 09, 2017 1:49 PM

oltmannd
  

The shame is that the existing Acela coaches can't be downgrade and kept for regional service.

 
Oltmannd:  That has been this poster's thoughts as well.  Can  imagine an Acela-1 running from Harrisburg <> Springfield, Ma if the Springfield section is electrified by the time all the A-2s are in service.  Keystone service just Harrisburg - NYP would certainly be welcomed by the state of PA .  Wonder if all station stops for the A-1s coud get high level platforms ?
 
Certainly the A-1s should be kept as standby for a couple years in case of any major problem shows up with the A-2s.  Another thought is maybe A-1s could be used for lower traffic times in the day.  Overnight ?  The Thanksgiving, Christmas rush, and other holidays as well.  Then there may be the additional trains NYP <> BOS if the 39 daily train limit is raised ?   
   
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Posted by JPS1 on Monday, October 09, 2017 8:42 PM

oltmannd
 New ones are lighter weight and higher capacity and paid for with net revenue from existing Acela service. 

Amtrak says the new Acela train sets, which are scheduled to enter service in 2021, will have 1/3rd more seats than the existing equipment, will offer better amenities, and will be capable of speeds of 160 mph where the infastructure will allow it.

Amtrak says that the new fleet will be funded with a $2 billion loan from the Railroad Rehabilitation and Improvement Financing (RRIF) Program.  The debt will be service by NEC operating profits; Amtrak did not say that it would be covered solely by Acela operating profits. 

In 2016 Acela operations accounted for 60.1 percent of NEC operating profits.  Presumably some if not all of the operating profits generated by the regional trains will go to service the debt associated with the new Acela train sets. 

Amtrak is currently the second largest RRIF debitor.  Anticipated borrowing to cover the new Acela equipment, as well as other NEC infrastructure improvements, will boost its total borrowings to more than $3 billion, making it the largest beneficiary of the program.  The program is a low cost government funding program supported by the taxpayers. 

Rio Grande Valley, CFI,CFII

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Posted by oltmannd on Tuesday, October 10, 2017 6:45 AM

JPS1
Amtrak did not say that it would be covered solely by Acela operating profits. 

Okay.  Thanks.  

Acela generates half of the NEC revenue and over half of NEC profit.  

-Don (Random stuff, mostly about trains - what else? http://blerfblog.blogspot.com/

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Posted by longhorn1969 on Friday, October 13, 2017 12:56 PM

blue streak 1

 

From what I have read, the present Acelas are mx intensive.

 

 
oltmannd
  

The shame is that the existing Acela coaches can't be downgrade and kept for regional service.

 

 

 
Oltmannd:  That has been this poster's thoughts as well.  Can  imagine an Acela-1 running from Harrisburg <> Springfield, Ma if the Springfield section is electrified by the time all the A-2s are in service.  Keystone service just Harrisburg - NYP would certainly be welcomed by the state of PA .  Wonder if all station stops for the A-1s coud get high level platforms ?
 
Certainly the A-1s should be kept as standby for a couple years in case of any major problem shows up with the A-2s.  Another thought is maybe A-1s could be used for lower traffic times in the day.  Overnight ?  The Thanksgiving, Christmas rush, and other holidays as well.  Then there may be the additional trains NYP <> BOS if the 39 daily train limit is raised ?   
   
 

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Posted by oltmannd on Friday, October 13, 2017 5:06 PM

Reliability could be the reason why they're not staying around.  But, if they have solid, stainless carbodies, I would think a rebuilding would be in order and cheaper than new coaches.  Strip out a lot of systems they really don't have to have.

-Don (Random stuff, mostly about trains - what else? http://blerfblog.blogspot.com/

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Posted by ANDREW C SELDEN on Monday, October 16, 2017 10:01 AM

NEC or Acela "operating profits" are a myth. 

The proof of this came last year when NEC train service revenues early- to mid-year were falling well short of budget, and management was forced to defer $473 million in budgeted NEC maintenance (and purchasing) in order to keep cash outlays within the limits of cash revenue plus subsidy. (Even Amtrak has a hard time spending cash it doesn't have.) 

If the NEC had an "operating profit," a shortfall in budgeted revenue would simply reduce the margin, not force deferred maintenance. This has gone on for decades, by the way. The so-called cost to restore the NEC to a "state of good repair" is simply the sum of the annual upkeep that Amtrak has not done in order to keep the NEC trains running.

All this is visible in the monthly and Annual reports accessible on the website.

The RRIF loans can be repaid in the future only from future subsidy payments.

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Posted by longhorn1969 on Monday, October 16, 2017 10:11 AM

oltmannd

Reliability could be the reason why they're not staying around.  But, if they have solid, stainless carbodies, I would think a rebuilding would be in order and cheaper than new coaches.  Strip out a lot of systems they really don't have to have.

 

 

Why? Amtrak is no doubt trying to standardize their equipment for lower maintenance costs. Why keep Acela coaches when there are newer and less mx coaches availible? Which will be easier.......no, cheape getting parts for, a 20 year old out of production Acela or a Siemens coach thats been sold around the world and is still in production?

The Acela may look cool and be neat, but operationally their time has come and its about to go.

 

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Posted by oltmannd on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 3:04 PM

longhorn1969

 

 
oltmannd

Reliability could be the reason why they're not staying around.  But, if they have solid, stainless carbodies, I would think a rebuilding would be in order and cheaper than new coaches.  Strip out a lot of systems they really don't have to have.

 

 

 

 

Why? Amtrak is no doubt trying to standardize their equipment for lower maintenance costs. Why keep Acela coaches when there are newer and less mx coaches availible? Which will be easier.......no, cheape getting parts for, a 20 year old out of production Acela or a Siemens coach thats been sold around the world and is still in production?

The Acela may look cool and be neat, but operationally their time has come and its about to go.

 

 

I just hate seeing perfectly good carbodies going to scrap.  I can see that they might be a bit too complex to be good rebuild candidates and few in number might make them orphans.  That's a shame.

-Don (Random stuff, mostly about trains - what else? http://blerfblog.blogspot.com/

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Posted by oltmannd on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 3:12 PM

ANDREW C SELDEN

NEC or Acela "operating profits" are a myth. 

The proof of this came last year when NEC train service revenues early- to mid-year were falling well short of budget, and management was forced to defer $473 million in budgeted NEC maintenance (and purchasing) in order to keep cash outlays within the limits of cash revenue plus subsidy. (Even Amtrak has a hard time spending cash it doesn't have.) 

If the NEC had an "operating profit," a shortfall in budgeted revenue would simply reduce the margin, not force deferred maintenance. This has gone on for decades, by the way. The so-called cost to restore the NEC to a "state of good repair" is simply the sum of the annual upkeep that Amtrak has not done in order to keep the NEC trains running.

All this is visible in the monthly and Annual reports accessible on the website.

The RRIF loans can be repaid in the future only from future subsidy payments.

 

This is a moot point.  Whether you are factually right or wrong, it has become clear what Antrak's path forward will look like.  Investment in the NEC is the focus.

-Don (Random stuff, mostly about trains - what else? http://blerfblog.blogspot.com/

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Posted by D.Carleton on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 8:40 PM

oltmannd
 
ANDREW C SELDEN

NEC or Acela "operating profits" are a myth. 

The proof of this came last year when NEC train service revenues early- to mid-year were falling well short of budget, and management was forced to defer $473 million in budgeted NEC maintenance (and purchasing) in order to keep cash outlays within the limits of cash revenue plus subsidy. (Even Amtrak has a hard time spending cash it doesn't have.) 

If the NEC had an "operating profit," a shortfall in budgeted revenue would simply reduce the margin, not force deferred maintenance. This has gone on for decades, by the way. The so-called cost to restore the NEC to a "state of good repair" is simply the sum of the annual upkeep that Amtrak has not done in order to keep the NEC trains running.

All this is visible in the monthly and Annual reports accessible on the website.

The RRIF loans can be repaid in the future only from future subsidy payments.

This is a moot point.  Whether you are factually right or wrong, it has become clear what Antrak's path forward will look like.  Investment in the NEC is the focus.

NEC=Nothing Else Counts.

As for "operating profit" as Comrade Lenin said, "A lie repeated often enough becomes truth."

Editor Emeritus, This Week at Amtrak

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