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NJTransit Atlantic City Rail Line Speed Limit

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NJTransit Atlantic City Rail Line Speed Limit
Posted by alloboard on Tuesday, February 21, 2017 11:34 PM

What is the maximum speed of trains of the Atlantic City Rail Line? I thought that they went suprisingly fast like 90-100 when I was in one. They were sure faster than the Trenton to NYC NJT trains. How embarassing! Diesels run faster on a less buisier line.

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Posted by Buslist on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 11:45 AM

alloboard

What is the maximum speed of trains of the Atlantic City Rail Line? I thought that they went suprisingly fast like 90-100 when I was in one. They were sure faster than the Trenton to NYC NJT trains. How embarassing! Diesels run faster on a less buisier line.

 

 

suggest you recalibrate.

Trenton NYC is one of the fastest on the NEC @125. Some years ago ATK was planning to upgrade parts of it to 160. Haven't heard of any progress there .

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Posted by alloboard on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 12:04 PM

Yes only for Amtrak trains. The local commuter trains going to NYC are slow.

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Posted by NorthWest on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 3:48 PM

I don't think the Atlantic City Line has any form of automatic train stop, so the trains are probably limited to 79MPH. The stations are farther apart, though, so the trains spend a lot more time at their maximum speed.

The NEC line as a lot of closely spaced stops, so trains spend most of their time accelerating and decelerating rather than running at their higher top speed.

RME
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Posted by RME on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 6:48 PM

alloboard
The local commuter trains going to NYC are slow.

When did that happen?  Even in the 1980s I regularly observed 'all-stops' locals with Silverliners routinely reaching speeds over 100mph indicated between some of the stations.  You could tell this because it was possible to ride in the rear vestibule and fold down the motorman's seatboard for an 'observation car' effect, and observe the brake gauges and speedometer directly.

Occasionally you'd see startling high speed on Atlantic City service RDC speedometers.  But that was almost certainly because some of those speedometers were Italian-car optimistic.

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Posted by conrailman on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 6:56 PM

Speed is 70 to 79, i think Atlantic City Line.

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Posted by alloboard on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 8:38 PM

Trust me they can go up to at least 90. The GP38-40 can go 100MPH The train was swaying. I remember that had to be more than 80.

RME
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Posted by RME on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 9:04 PM

I know of no GP38 that is geared higher than 65mph, and it would rapidly run out of usable drawbar TE at its constant maximum horsepower with any appreciable passenger load long before it reached 90mph.  Some of the GP40Ps had 61:16 gears for "77mph" (in other words, essentially full track speed under the 80mph ATC requirement) but again that's a long way from 100mph.

Yes, the F40s had taller ratios (57:20 for 103mph; 56:21 for 110) but I have never heard of a GP40 having those ratios.  (You could order a GP50 with 42" wheels and 92mph gearing, but acceleration times might require a calendar in heavy commuter service...)

It's not as if the Atlantic City route is inherently slow -- at just before the turn of the century, some of the Camden-Atlantic City expresses were the fastest trains in the world.  But I don't think gambling expresses command quite the same justification that the competition back then provided... or that state-funded agencies would spend the considerable money needed to take Atlantic City service legally past 79mph when those funds could be applied to new or better service elsewhere.

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Thursday, February 23, 2017 7:00 AM

The fact that the train was swaying is no guaranteed indicator of speed.  Condition of the track is also a factor.  I can remember riding a Rock Island suburban train west of Blue Island in the mid-1970's and it was swaying at 20 MPH.  This was at a time when crews received a five-page train order to cover the slow orders between La Salle Street Station and Joliet.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by Electroliner 1935 on Thursday, February 23, 2017 11:06 PM

My recollection of the one time I rode Amtrak to Atlantic City, the train had an ex-metroliner cab car and we were operating in push mode. The train had the PRR cab signals and we did run over 80 mph. I never left the A C station and one memory I have is of the little older ladies riding back home after visiting the casinos and counting their remaining change. Kind of sad. 

RME
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Posted by RME on Saturday, February 25, 2017 1:10 AM

Does anyone here remember how fast the ACE (the train with the diesel on one end and the electric on the other) ran on the 'diesel' end of the route? 

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Posted by oltmannd on Saturday, February 25, 2017 6:57 AM

alloboard

What is the maximum speed of trains of the Atlantic City Rail Line? I thought that they went suprisingly fast like 90-100 when I was in one. They were sure faster than the Trenton to NYC NJT trains. How embarassing! Diesels run faster on a less buisier line.

 

80 mph is the maximum authorized speed.  The line is cab siganalled the whole way.  The original plans were for the bottom 10-15 miles to be good for 90 mph, but that was scrapped when Amtrak pulled out.  I don't know if Amtrak ever operated at 90 mph or not.  

The GP40PH-2B locomotives that were typically used for many years by NJT are only allowed 90 mph, anyway, mostly due to their weight.

The big problem with the line isn't the speeds south of Lindewold, it's the running time from Lindenwold to 30th St.  If you are commuting to Phila, it's much quicker to hop off the AC train at Lindenwold and take PATCO Hi Speed Line the rest of the way.

-Don (Random stuff, mostly about trains - what else? http://blerfblog.blogspot.com/

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Posted by oltmannd on Saturday, February 25, 2017 7:27 AM

Electroliner 1935

My recollection of the one time I rode Amtrak to Atlantic City, the train had an ex-metroliner cab car and we were operating in push mode. The train had the PRR cab signals and we did run over 80 mph. I never left the A C station and one memory I have is of the little older ladies riding back home after visiting the casinos and counting their remaining change. Kind of sad. 

 

Electroliner 1935

My recollection of the one time I rode Amtrak to Atlantic City, the train had an ex-metroliner cab car and we were operating in push mode. The train had the PRR cab signals and we did run over 80 mph.  

Amtrak typically operated with the cab car on the east end, locomotive pulling back to Phila. 

Some video here https://youtu.be/hEhb9IWH2hw

-Don (Random stuff, mostly about trains - what else? http://blerfblog.blogspot.com/

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Posted by Lansdowne John on Thursday, March 09, 2017 10:17 AM

alloboard

What is the maximum speed of trains of the Atlantic City Rail Line? I thought that they went suprisingly fast like 90-100 when I was in one. They were sure faster than the Trenton to NYC NJT trains. How embarassing! Diesels run faster on a less buisier line.

 

Very fast service

I ride this line on a regular basis and as was mentioned below Lindenwold the speeds are fast. I have timed the train out my window using mileage markers and a watch with a second hand. Most of the time at high speed I have est. Train speed as 75 MPH or so. So I would say the maximum speed is rated as 79 MPH. I also did ride this line in the old days of the RDC's and got to ride in the front cab on several occasions. Back then with limited stops and low intermediate station ridership we arrived early at Atlantic City As much as 10 minutes early. I don't know how accurate the speedometers were but I did see it hit 100 MPH on many sections of the line. 

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