Jerusalem Light Rail

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Jerusalem Light Rail
Posted by daveklepper on Monday, September 18, 2017 3:16 AM

Sharing my photos, starting with construction, which began in 2010:

Before construction began, sign preparing people for some disruption:

Former busway prepared for track construction

On Jaffa Road downtown, track to be in pavement in pedestrian and transit road.

At main postoffice:

 

Gauge and location bars at the crossover located north of the Shimon HaTzaddik station:

track fasening:

 

Close-up of switch-points:

Frog:

Track installed on Herzl Boulevard before pavement installation

Paving in process:

Completed paving at crossings:

Yard and shops, ;polds erected but catenary to come.  Pieces of car bodies

April 2012

Cavatrava Bridge of Strings

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Posted by MidlandMike on Monday, September 18, 2017 9:28 PM

Interesting curved cable-stayed bridge.

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, September 19, 2017 4:51 AM

 

Supervising the bridge construction.

Ballast fill befor eveling:

Next tocome will be the testing phase, which began while the bridge and the southernmost track were still under construction.

 

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, September 27, 2017 5:21 AM

Testing, including material from the Jerusalem Post

I have will also post additional pictures on the edited previous posting, construction.

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Posted by blue streak 1 on Thursday, September 28, 2017 10:10 PM

Dave notice it  appears to be variable tension CAT ?  What are the temperature vtiations there ?  Appears that although the vehicles use standard PANs the way the trolley wire is attached would allow regular trolley poles ?  Is that just what the pictures show is that system wide ?

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, October 01, 2017 1:49 AM

1.  Yes, constant tension, and I hope to post pix soon, possible today or tomorrow.

2.  I think trolley poles would work except at all switches, where there are no frogs, just wires side-by-side.  A heritage car would work but would require a pole-shifting at each switch.  Oh yes, also at the weight locations for the constant-tension catenary.

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, October 02, 2017 9:22 AM

Since I do not currently have the edit button the thread is abayance and I cannot currently continue further.

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, October 03, 2017 7:16 AM

I can post photos without the edit button, but not text.

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Posted by MidlandMike on Tuesday, October 03, 2017 8:34 PM

The trolley signal seems to have shades of PRR position lights.

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, October 05, 2017 12:09 PM

Yes.   For detailed info, daveklepper@yahoo.com or wait until my edit button is restored.

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Posted by daveklepper on Saturday, October 07, 2017 10:34 PM

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, October 09, 2017 5:10 PM

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, October 10, 2017 11:45 AM

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, October 12, 2017 2:54 PM

Just slightly off-topic, Haifa's funicular subway is well-known, but the telefarique south of the city less well known, called the Rakball.

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, October 12, 2017 3:35 PM

Back on topic

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Posted by Firelock76 on Thursday, October 12, 2017 7:19 PM

You've got to hand it to the Israelis, they know how to get things done.

Here in the US after seven years they'd only be finishing the first round of environmental impact studies.

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Posted by daveklepper on Saturday, October 14, 2017 12:47 PM

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Posted by daveklepper on Saturday, October 14, 2017 9:20 PM

Red Line existing, its extensions dashed:

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, October 24, 2017 6:31 AM

 

 

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, November 23, 2017 12:37 AM

In answer to some of the questions as to the improvement in the lives of those of us living in Jerusalem as a result of the first Light Rail Line, I can point out that there were only five sidwalk cafes before its consruction and now there are 8 on Jaffa Road in downtown Jerusalem.  The better air and quieter environment encourage people to eat and drink on sidewalks in good weather instead of inside. Here is some interesting data:

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, January 09, 2018 11:16 AM

An error in the preceding posting.  Meant to write 38, not 8!   But now there are about 45.

 

A step forward is that there is now a new 84 Egged bus that directly comnnects the light rail stop nearest my apartment (Amunition Hill,  British Mandate name that has not been changed) directly to the Mt. of Olives Cemetary.  Previoiusly morners had to use taxis or private autos.  There is a stop each direction not far from my Yeshiva, but not as close as the 48 line's stop, and 48's service has been reduced from 12 each day to six.  The 48 originates at the same light rail stop, which is also the stop where most suburban busses interchange with the light rail line.

The reduction in service of the 48 may mean more trips for me on the Arab sector 275 from the Yeshiva's back door to Damascus Gate near the light rail station of that name.

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, January 29, 2019 5:45 AM
The way Citipass Light Rail, Jerusalem, handles lost monthly passes, may be unique in the industry, and may be of interest.
After renewing my monthly pass plastic for January, it was stolen or lost, along with my Israeli identification, and other important identifications.  The first priority was Israeli identification, and this required a visit to first the Police lost-and-found, and then to Police Headquarters.  This was followed by two visits to the Interior Ministry, with temporary identification provided, and a second on 24 January to activate my new identification card.
As soon as I received the temporary identification, I went to the Egged bus offices, where they produced a duplicate plastic, with my picture, from their computer files.  But they said to activate, I would need to visit the Citipass offices, to which I went directly.  They asked standard questions concerning the loss, and then told me I would need to first get the Police lost-and-found to verify it was lost.  I pointed out that I had visited that office already, and that the Police Clerk there had agreed to email me if the lost identification and plastic pass were to show up.  Finally, the Citipass office people agreed to activate it, and gave me a paper  to sign, which I wrongly assumed only acknowledge the activation.
"Wrongly assume?"   When I returned to the Yeshiva from the Interior Ministry, with the activated Israeli identification, a note from the bank was on my desk indicating 94.40 Sheckles had been withdrawn from my bank account by Citipass.  The regular activation of the plastic for a month for senior citizens is 106.50, and I am 87.
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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, February 24, 2019 12:59 AM

latest update from Jerusalem Post of 22 Feb. on expansion of the system:

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, August 11, 2019 11:32 AM

Spanish-Israeli owned company TransJerusalem J-Net Ltd. was selected by an inter ministerial committee on Wednesday to construct the planned extension of the Jerusalem Light Rail and take over operations of the growing network.

Owned by Shapir Engineering and Spanish rail firm CAF, TransJerusalem J-Net was established for the purpose of competing for the Jerusalem JNET tender.

The second consortium bidding for the tender – Shikun & Binui and Egged, together with the Chinese company CRRC, Spanish firm COMSA, Portuguese corporation EFACEC and Polish service provider MPK – was unsuccessful.

The tender, for which bids were submitted by a May deadline, includes taking over the operation and maintenance of the existing Red Line, as well as the extension of the northern segment of the line to Neveh Ya’acov and the southern segment to Hadassah-University Medical Center in Ein Kerem.

The company will replace the CityPass Group, which built and has operated the light rail since construction began in 2002.

The company will also be responsible for the construction of the Green Line, which will run from Mount Scopus to Gilo and Malha, with branches to Hebrew University’s Givat Ram campus and Givat Shaul. The new line is expected to transport 160,000 passengers around the city on a daily basis.

The project includes the construction of 27 km. of rail, 50 stations, the design and manufacture of over 100 carriages and significant network control infrastructure. Operation of the expanded network, set to stretch over 40 km. of the city once complete, is due to commence gradually in 2022 and be fully operational by 2025.
 
“Selecting the winner of the JNET project is a key milestone in promoting Jerusalem’s transportation infrastructure,” said Accountant-General Rony Hizkiyahu.

“This project is a significant part of the 2030 Plan, in which infrastructure projects are expected to be implemented in a variety of areas such as energy, desalination, waste and, of course, other transportation projects, such as the light rail in Tel Aviv and the metro project in Gush Dan,” Hizkiyahu said.

“Completing the tender process in such a short time frame demonstrates that government ministries are working diligently to advance the standard of infrastructure in Israel to the standard of developed countries as soon as possible.”

The project, a public-private partnership, will be the largest of its kind in Israel to date. TransJerusalem J-Net will operate the network for an initial period of 15 years, with an option for an additional 10 years, and will be responsible for the maintenance of the network for 25 years.
/Steve

 
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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, September 19, 2019 2:17 PM

Two new  photos, an interior picture and construction along my past regular bus coummute.  (I now have much less walking and more enjoyment by leaving the 34 bus at the nearest light rail statioh, going downtown to Damascus Gate, Old Cty Wall, and then using the 255 or 275 to the back-door of the Yeshiva.)

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