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CP Light Engine Move Derailment caught on video (Calgary)

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CP Light Engine Move Derailment caught on video (Calgary)
Posted by CMStPnP on Monday, August 10, 2020 8:39 PM
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Posted by BaltACD on Monday, August 10, 2020 9:37 PM

CMStPnP

Wondering if the GMTX engines had coupler limiting blocks installed?

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Posted by ORNHOO on Tuesday, August 11, 2020 12:37 AM
Is that a "small hook"? At 5:35?
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Posted by bogie_engineer on Tuesday, August 11, 2020 9:36 AM

The MP15 did not have alignment control draft gear. When we shipped them besides the coupler swing limiting blocks BaltACD mentions, there were bolster stops applied that limited lateral motion bolster to truck frame to about 1" instead of the 2.25" new clearance, all to avoid jack-knifing. But I wouldn't have expected with only two engines ahead of it to derail as it did. 

Dave

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Posted by Paul Milenkovic on Tuesday, August 11, 2020 11:15 AM

Wild speculation in advance of the facts from an investigation.

Was this a backing move without the proper visibility, crew member giving signals on the ground?  Did the two units in question derail on a switch set against their direction of movement?

If GM "killed the electric car", what am I doing standing next to an EV-1, a half a block from the WSOR tracks?
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Posted by caldreamer on Tuesday, August 11, 2020 11:59 AM

Watching the video, the train was moving forward under the overpass when the engines derailed.

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Posted by rdamon on Tuesday, August 11, 2020 3:47 PM

Looking at 2:01 does the GP40 jump when going over the grade crossing?

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Posted by BaltACD on Tuesday, August 11, 2020 7:46 PM

bogie_engineer
The MP15 did not have alignment control draft gear. When we shipped them besides the coupler swing limiting blocks BaltACD mentions, there were bolster stops applied that limited lateral motion bolster to truck frame to about 1" instead of the 2.25" new clearance, all to avoid jack-knifing. But I wouldn't have expected with only two engines ahead of it to derail as it did. 

Dave

What I was thinking the 2 'little' engine being moved without coupler limiting blocks (grain elevator they called home likely had serious curvature) - looked like the lead engine in the move was the controlling engine and there were what - 7 or 8 engines behind the 'little 2'.  If there was a small element of 'slack run in' from the trailing engines the force of the run in against the coupler/draft gear with unrestrined couplers could have created stresses to spread the rail - and all fall down on the ground.

I am not an engineer and stayed at a Holiday Inn several years ago.Geeked

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Posted by 7j43k on Wednesday, August 12, 2020 9:23 AM

Looking at the lead (in direction of travel) truck on the blue GP38, I see a wheel bumping upwards significantly at 1:55.  A few feet later, the truck starts spreading a dust cloud in the air.  Then it looks like it might rerail itself (it happens once in awhile).  And then the increasing derailment.

I tried to see if the CP loco leading also experienced such a "wheel bump" and didn't see anything.

 

Ed

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Posted by CMStPnP on Wednesday, August 12, 2020 9:51 AM

7j43k
Looking at the lead (in direction of travel) truck on the blue GP38, I see a wheel bumping upwards significantly at 1:55.  And not much for a ways.  And then the increasing derailment.   Ed

That was my observation as well that it was the GM leasing Geep that bit the ballast first and if you listen carefully you can hear the loud steel on steel clank of a very heavy steel object being dropped a foot or so and a wisp of dust from the front of the Geep.

What I don't understand though is why it took the Locomotive Engineer so long to realize there was an issue.   He had to have felt the slight tug of resistance on the consist as that unit hit the ground vs traveling on the rail.     Beats me though, just seemed like it took him a while to realize there was an issue.

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Posted by zugmann on Wednesday, August 12, 2020 9:54 AM

Looks like they were being shoved by the widebodies on the tail.  I have my own wild-as...I can imagine guess:   a little too much oomph throu a switch after a brake application that didn't have time to fully release? looks like the dead engines are just brakepipe'd. 

   The opinions expressed here represent my own and not those of my employer or any other railroad, company, or person.

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