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Union Pacific M 10000

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Posted by Overmod on Saturday, June 6, 2020 2:53 PM

BEAUSABRE
The July-August edition has an ICC roster and given their passion for completeness, they'd probably mention it if it hung around for years after being sold

ICC valuation department wouldn't give a crap about what was done with a locomotive after a railroad retired it for scrap, unless it was subsequently bought for operation by another railroad subject to ICC valuation oversight.  It was only actual railroad ownership of capital equipment, not the equipment itself, that would be of any concern.

I haven't seen anything saying that the engine and perhaps cars the OP remembered at Cleveland were intended to operate -- my impression was that they were intended as an attraction to spur patronage, the way a trucking firm might have a tractor-trailer high on its facade or a car dealership something like a MG or Beetle welded to a pole in the days long before perceived collector value went up.  The only 'records' concerning such a sale would be receipts from the scrapyard or whoever provided transportation -- and the likelihood of finding those nearly three-quarters of a century later appear pretty slim to me.

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Posted by Deggesty on Saturday, June 6, 2020 8:23 PM

York1

 

 
Deggesty
When I lived in Wesson, Mississippi (55 miles south of Jackson)

 

 

I had a family friend who lived in Wesson.  He worked for the federal government  dealing with railroads.

 

Hmm, I do not recall knowing anyone with such an occupation; I lived there from 1962 to 1965. The only people there I knew who had a connection with railroading were a retired agent and the then agent.

Johnny

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Posted by BEAUSABRE on Saturday, June 6, 2020 8:34 PM

Sorry, I meant IC not ICC. (Duh!) Anyway, the crew at X2200S would have been all over a pioneering diesel from the streamliner era if it was still in existance or had a life after the RR. I can remember reading in the 60's numerous times about what steaners were parked at someone's scrapyard (IIRC, a N&W Y6b lasted until 75 or so until rescuers gave up), http://www.rypn.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=12665), we had a CNJ ex-Blue Comet observation car (Biela) that was part of a restaurant fairly close to where I grew up http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=4055629, so why not some data on a streamliner....Yes, it's a long shot, but who knows.....

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Posted by samfp1943 on Saturday, June 6, 2020 10:11 PM

Here is a linked photo of the ICRR's Land'oCorn "AC&F built " MotoRailer"  

@ http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=3227192

 It started service in about 1940 and ran  Chicago to Waterloo,Ia. as trains #13 and #14.  In Feb. 1942 the train hit a semitruck at Plato Cntr. Il. It was returned to ACF to be repaired. Later was re-sold to 'The SusieQ' [NYS&W] which already had a couple of 'Moto-Railer' sets.  

 

 


 

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, June 7, 2020 8:55 AM

I have vague childhood memories of the Suzy-Q's Motorailers.  I recall them as being only one car, not two, double-ended (a sort of RDC-1 predecessor), running from a Lincoln Tunnel rail-bus transfer station, which was also a stop for most of the steam trains, all of which continued to Erie's Jersey City (Pavonia) Terminal, to downtown Patterson, on a stub-end branch.  In my memory they did not go into Erie Terminal.   I think the service may have been the victim of the DOT's general curtailment of oil-and-rubber tire transportation, since the alternatives were all-rail, Erie Terminal and then the Hudson and Manhattan, and Erie Terminal and the Erie ferry boats.  Logical that at the buildup to USA's entrance to WWII, increased business could have suggested a two-car train.  But was the IC's double-ended?   And can anyone confirm my memories of the Susquhanna's operation?  Did it run through WWII and afterward, or was it revived ater WWII?

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Sunday, June 7, 2020 11:00 AM

David, you remember pretty good!

The Suzie-Q originally had two of what they called "Motorailers," numbered 1001 and 1002, and they were definately double-ended to save turning.  They ran from Paterson to Susquehanna Transfer which was the Lincoln Tunnel bus connection to New York City.  The service began in 1940.

A Motorailer was tried on the Suzi-Q's Hanford Branch out in the wilds of northwestern New Jersey, but it couldn't handle the grades. 

Otherwise, they were so successful that the Susquehanna bought two more Motorailers second-hand from the Illinois Central in 1943.

They leased a gas-electric Brill from the Erie in 1940 that ran from Butler to Jersey City, but in 1944 returned it to the Erie.

Brill gas-electrics were also purchased from the Boston and Maine (1940) and the Cumberland and Pennsylvania (1942).

All in all the "Motorailers" and gas-electrics were quite successful, although 1001 was destroyed by a fire in 1947, and ran until they were replaced by RDC's beginning in 1950. 

Here's a picture of one of the Motorailers, plus more than anyone wants to know about the Susquehanna.

http://www.classicstreamliners.com/rr-nys-w.html   

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Posted by York1 on Sunday, June 7, 2020 11:19 AM

Deggesty
York1
Deggesty
When I lived in Wesson, Mississippi (55 miles south of Jackson)

I had a family friend who lived in Wesson.  He worked for the federal government  dealing with railroads.

 

Hmm, I do not recall knowing anyone with such an occupation; I lived there from 1962 to 1965. The only people there I knew who had a connection with railroading were a retired agent and the then agent.

 

 

Sorry, my post was a misleading.  The man was from Wesson, worked for the government while living in New Orleans, and then retired back to Wesson.  The last time I was in Wesson and saw him was right after Katrina; he and his wife took in a family friend after the New Orleans house was flooded.

York1 John       

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