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Locomotive "Whistle"?

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  • Member since
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Posted by edblysard on Sunday, February 12, 2017 7:10 PM
The GCOR uses the term Whistle to indicate use of both the actual whistle on a steam locomotive and the horn that replaced it on diesel electric/electric locomotives…the term is still used as a matter of continuity and convenience.
Here is a link to the current GCOR

 

RME
  • Member since
    March, 2016
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Posted by RME on Sunday, February 12, 2017 7:18 PM

Firelock76
Doesn't explain why the NYC put air horns on the Niagaras though. Just to be modern and "cool?"

The Railway Mechanical Engineer articles on the Niagara specifically mention the various savings to be derived from the use of a 'pneuphonic' horn blown by compressed air vs. the use of superheated steam.  (Whistle on the C1a was likewise to use superheated steam so I'd expect those would have gotten horns by '47; on the other hand, the A2a Berkshires, last NYC big steam, never got horns -- which was an advantage, because they had some of the finest whistles ever applied to steam power...)

RME
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Posted by RME on Monday, February 13, 2017 10:23 PM

Meanwhile, the plot thickens.  While I was looking over Eastern 4-8-4s (and then a wider selection of 4-8-4s) for what has turned out to be the Locomotive Draft Control Device, I noticed some interesting details concerning air horns.

In the 1975 PRM book on "Northerns", p.110, there is a lovely shot of the Timken Four Aces on the DL&W at Hoboken Terminal, with a rather amazing chime horn visible at the top of the boiler (it has at least four bells).  I thought perhaps the horn was actually mounted (for a reason I couldn't really explain) on the cat-bridge structure behind the locomotive, but there's a picture of Lackawanna 1501 with a very similar horn, in a very similar place, on p.21. 

Meanwhile, judging from what I've seen, all the Lackawanna Q-4-a's had small single air horns, right on center top of the boiler just ahead of the sand dome.  How they kept cinders, soot and such out of this bell, small as it was, I'm not sure...

  • Member since
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  • From: Huntsville, AR
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Posted by oldline1 on Monday, March 20, 2017 2:23 PM

RME

 

 
oldline1
I own a Nathan P5 "whistle". I have the maintenance sheets and some other data from Nathan that refer to this huge and loud creature as a "whistle".

 

Interesting, because the official Nathan site now doesn't refer to the AirChimes as anything but 'horns'.

You might provide the date of the material you have, and perhaps document numbers or even scans, as it would be interesting to identify when their policies changed.

 

Well, I lack the intelligence to master posting photos and stuff to Kalmbach's site. 

I checked my parts pages and maintenance pages for my P5 and they have no dates but everywhere they call it a whistle. I went to the Nathan site and they do call it a horn. 

Apparently they refer to the entire assembly as "whistle" and the individual cone shaped things I always heard of as "bells' as the "horn". Go figure?

I don't know when they changed the terminology or why.

Roger Huber

Deer Creek Locomotive Works

 

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  • From: US
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Posted by BaltACD on Monday, March 20, 2017 5:32 PM

I may be mistaken, but I do believe what is shown as GM&O 1200 started life as B&O 50 and it was originially equipped with a horn.

 

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

NDG
  • Member since
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  • 405 posts
Posted by NDG on Monday, March 20, 2017 10:07 PM

BaltACD

I may be mistaken, but I do believe what is shown as GM&O 1200 started life as B&O 50 and it was originially equipped with a horn.

 

 

 

I agree with you, Sir!

Could GM&O be using it mostly for Yard Service, and the single-note Honker deemed too loud in a Industrial setting inner city, lets say?

I do know many true Diesel yard engines had a single-note sheep-type BAAAH horn as they never were going fast, often many crossings on leads, and, for signalling before Radio.

These horns were quieter than a larger milti-chime one required to be heard a half-mile or whatever ahead @ 80 MPH +.

As children we wondered what the BAAAAH was, amongst the steam whistles of locomotives, ships and factories.

Thank You!  I did NOT know where the B&O unit went.

Now I do.

So much to learn!!

  • Member since
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  • From: US
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Posted by BaltACD on Monday, March 20, 2017 10:20 PM

B&O 50 was used on one of the 'lightweight' equipment sets on the Royal Blue between Washington and New York.  B&O President Daniel Willard didn't like the ride quality of this set of equipment and after a short time in operation it was sent to the B&O's Chicago & Alton subsidary along with B&O 50 to operate between St. Louis and Chicago.  On the Alton it was given a face lift and ran with the equipment as the Abraham Lincoln.  During WW II the B&O sold the Alton to the Mobile & Ohio which at some point thereafter renamed itself to the Gulf, Mobile & Ohio.

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Never too old to have a happy childhood!

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