favorite diesel locomotive

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Posted by Dmacleo on Monday, August 28, 2017 5:45 PM
I always liked the looks (really liked the looks) and sounds of the BL2 love the looks of the Saratoga and North Creek Railway.
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Posted by Bobkat525 on Monday, August 28, 2017 7:42 PM

Favorite: Any of the early Alco road switchers - RS1's 2's or 3's.

All-time favorite: Green Mounatain (ex-Rutland #405)

Least:  BL-2. Sorry, to me it just looks like a reject from the designers waste basket.

 

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Posted by Backshop on Monday, August 28, 2017 8:35 PM

Does anyone else have a connection between favorite railroads and favorite locomotives.  I've always liked the nonturbocharged EMD SD's and my favorite (small) railroads were the old US Steel roads.  See the connection?

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Posted by Umbicopter on Tuesday, August 29, 2017 3:26 PM

My favourite diesel locomotive is a GE ES44DC, is also the most used locomotive.

But I don't have a least favourite locomotive. All are beautiful! Instead what's your favourite locomotive?

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Posted by ATSFGuy on Wednesday, September 06, 2017 6:26 PM

Forgive me for saying this but what happened to Amtrak's P40's?

Alongside the F40PH and F59PHI, I like the P40's, they're a lot better than the P42's.

The red white and blue stripes on the side scream 90's to me.

 

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Posted by Firelock76 on Wednesday, September 06, 2017 7:08 PM

Hey, remember on August 27th I mentioned "The Green Diamond,"  otherwise know as "The Tomato Worm,"  or "Tobacco Worm" depending on which part on the country you lived in?

I went looking for some vintage film of the same but had no luck.  Maybe this'll do?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TQmnwL5Ds4g

Like I said, so ugly it's classic!

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Posted by wanswheel on Thursday, September 07, 2017 2:59 AM

Firelock, the Green Diamond looks kind of squashed. Pro basketball players probably had to take the Abe Lincoln.

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Posted by Firelock76 on Thursday, September 07, 2017 7:38 PM

Nice job Wanswheel!  You continue to amaze!

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Posted by zugmann on Saturday, September 09, 2017 4:41 PM

They gave me a tier 4 gevo for my local the other night.  A GE that actually loads and takes off in a timely manner.  Also could pull or push what we threw at it (although the amount of cars we moved around were child's play for a road engine).  I was pretty impressed with it.

 

The opinions expressed here represent my own and not those of my employer or any other railroad, company, or person.

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Posted by BaltACD on Saturday, September 09, 2017 7:34 PM

wanswheel
Firelock, the Green Diamond looks kind of squashed. Pro basketball players probably had to take the Abe Lincoln.

People - in all forms of activity were smaller then than today.  George Mikan was a 'giant' playing basketball after WW II at 6'10" - today there are a number of Guard's that are that size.

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

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Posted by Firelock76 on Sunday, September 10, 2017 10:38 AM

People smaller than today?  Well, it kind of depends...

Going by US military records, the average height (remember, this is average, some would have been taller, some shorter) of a soldier in the Revolutionary War was 5'8".  Eighty years later during the Civil War, it was the same, during the Spanish-American War, the same again, and again during World War One.

By World War Two, the average had gone up to 5'10".  Today, the average is 5'11".

And of course, just how tall you grew depended on how well you were fed.  In medieval Europe the aristocracy towered over the commoners  (nobles and knights who were six-footers weren't unusual) simply because they ate so much better. 

Here in the US country boys typically were taller than city boys due to the food factor.

So as I said, it all depends.   

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Posted by BaltACD on Sunday, September 10, 2017 10:44 PM

Firelock76
People smaller than today?  Well, it kind of depends...

Going by US military records, the average height (remember, this is average, some would have been taller, some shorter) of a soldier in the Revolutionary War was 5'8".  Eighty years later during the Civil War, it was the same, during the Spanish-American War, the same again, and again during World War One.

By World War Two, the average had gone up to 5'10".  Today, the average is 5'11".

And of course, just how tall you grew depended on how well you were fed.  In medieval Europe the aristocracy towered over the commoners  (nobles and knights who were six-footers weren't unusual) simply because they ate so much better. 

Here in the US country boys typically were taller than city boys due to the food factor.

So as I said, it all depends.   

Check out the dimensions of professional sports teams, today, 20 years ago, 40 years ago, 60 years ago etc.  With the understanding that these individuals would have the best of food, healthcare and training that each of the eras had available.

50 years ago 270-280 pound linemen were considered HUGE.  Today players of that size would be told they have to 'bulk up'.  300 pounds has become the low limit for linemen with a number being in the 340-350 range.  Even QB's are in the 240-260 range.

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Monday, September 11, 2017 7:12 AM

While interior linemen have become obscenely huge, that extra mass comes with a reduction in mobility.  They may have an advantage in straight-line run blocking or forming the pocket, but how often does an NFL team run sweeps or screnn passes these days.

In my sport (rugby), 240-250 pounds is about the maximum size because every player has to be able to cover the entire playing field.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by BaltACD on Monday, September 11, 2017 12:07 PM

CSSHEGEWISCH
While interior linemen have become obscenely huge, that extra mass comes with a reduction in mobility.  They may have an advantage in straight-line run blocking or forming the pocket, but how often does an NFL team run sweeps or screnn passes these days.

In my sport (rugby), 240-250 pounds is about the maximum size because every player has to be able to cover the entire playing field.

That mass in today's player is much more mobile than the lesser mass of players of past generations.  Bigger, Stronger, Faster applies to all players in sports.  Players are now trained to the level of thoroughbred racehorses.  The strength that the muscles have been trained to exceed the capacities of the connective tissues (ligaments and tendons) to keep everthing in working order and correct alignment.

With the 'two platoon' system of football, the players are trained to the Nth degree for their playing speciality.  Were the rules to change that players were required to be both offensive and defensive I am certain the player sizes would change (of course the NFLPA would not be happy about the decrease in their membership).  I possess a 1957 Baltimore Colts Media Guide - 33 player roster.  Currently there are 53 on each teams NFL roster with a 10 play 'practice squad'.

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

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