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EU electrification information

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  • Member since
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EU electrification information
Posted by blue streak 1 on Tuesday, May 11, 2021 1:29 PM

Does the EU have a comprehensive listing of all the various countries electrification systems ?.  Am mostly interested in various CAT systems and miles each or even line segments.  So the listings would be probably be DC various voltages both CAT and third rail.  AC frequencies and 'CAT voltages ?  That would be what 16.7, 25, and 50 Hz systems ?  Is the EU standard now 25 Kv - 50 Hz ?

What are any conversions planned ?

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Tuesday, May 11, 2021 1:54 PM

I don't know about a comprehensive listing but "Jane's World Railways" would have that information.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by Erik_Mag on Tuesday, May 11, 2021 9:19 PM

I don't think there would be any 25Hz installations in Europe. 1500VDC and 3000VDC would be the most common DC voltages.

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, May 13, 2021 6:14 AM

No longer.  High-volyage 50 Hz is now used more.

Not aure it ia 25KV.  Maybe 16KV.

And some 16-2/3 Hz 10-12 KV is still around.

In addition to 600, 750, 1500, and 3000V  DC.

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Posted by beaulieu on Thursday, May 13, 2021 7:10 AM

There are four electrification systems used on mainline railway systems in Europe(excluding narrow gauge). 1500V DC used in much of the Netherlands, and parts of France.

3000V DC used in parts of Belgium, parts of Italy, parts of Spain, Portugal, part of Czechia, part of Slovakia, parts of Poland, Russia, Belarus, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Slovenia, Ukraine.

15kV 16.7Hz  used in Germany, Switzerland, and Austria.

25kV 50Hz    used in Serbia, Bosnia - Herzogovina, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, and Greece. Also it is the second system in most Western European countries.

The is still much diesel operated trackage in most courtries, varying according to their wealth, though Germany still has a few branchline networks that are diesel operated. Only Switzerland is almost totally diesel free except for MOW and two special cases. One special case is a branch that serves a sugar mill and sees only seasonal service. And the other is a line traversing the streets of Zürich to serve a flour mill that is served every weekday.

As for conversions, Switzerland has paid for the French lines west of Geneve to be converted from 1500V DC to 25kV/50Hz to improve TGV services to Switzerland and also to allow older EMUs that had to use both 15kV/16.7Hz AC and 1500V DC to be replaced with modern AC system EMUs. Spain also has done some conversion of lines from 3000V DC to 25kV/50Hz AC to improve connectivity between their dual use High-speed lines.

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, May 13, 2021 9:48 AM

Thanks, and of course 600V, 750, and 1000V DC are used by many  transit systems (light-rail and Metro) and suburban commuter operations.

1000V DC is still in use on the Swiss-Italian St. Moritz - Tirano Ratian Railway meter-gauge line.

What has dissapeared is the three-phase AC two-wire distribution system.  Or is there one or more still around? 

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Posted by Cursator on Thursday, May 13, 2021 11:23 AM

Quick addition here: In Switzerland there are several narrow gauge railways with 15kV 16.7Hz as well (BAM, ZB, YSteC) and the network of the RhB and MGB are 11kV 16.7Hz (except the Bernina Line with 1000VDC, the Arosa and the Mesocco lines were also DC but the Arosa line was redone with 11kV and Mesocco line was closed).

The three last standart gauge DC remnants are the Uetliberg line of the SZU, a small local line from Chavornay to Orbe (OC) and the cog railway to the Rigi. The former two will be reelectrified in the next few years.

The 15kV part extends more to the north: Sweden and Norway also use it, with the exeption that they never changed the frequency from 16 2/3Hz to 16.7Hz.

In Switzerland at least there are two narrow gauge mountain railways with three phased arrangement remaining (cog driven only): the Gornergrat Railway (GGB) and the Jungfrau Railway (JB). I know from one more in Rio de Janeiro, the "Trem do Corcovado".

I know from one railway which has 25Hz in Europe: The Mariazell Railway in Austria, they have gotten fresh rolling stock and it looks like this will stay.

If you are looking for an overview over europe and its gauges, electrification and classification ot its lines there was a guy doing exactly that. He stopped some time ago, so newer stuff will not ne there but mostly there were no changes just additions:

http://bueker.net/trainspotting/maps.php

 

New electification and new lines are generally done in 25kV 50Hz or 15kV 16.7Hz for main lines and High Speed lines. The only exeptions are in case the electrification is done in big, preexisting DC networks.

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Posted by MidlandMike on Thursday, May 13, 2021 7:32 PM

beaulieu
Only Switzerland is almost totally diesel free except for MOW and two special cases. One special case is a branch that serves a sugar mill and sees only seasonal service. And the other is a line traversing the streets of Zürich to serve a flour mill that is served every weekday.

The connection in Zermatt between the MGB "Glacier Express Line" (single phase) and the Gornergrat (three phase) is a short wire gap section that uses a diesel switcher.

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Posted by Cursator on Wednesday, May 19, 2021 9:10 AM

The connection between the GGB and the MGB is not used in regular service with passengers, so it is more of a yard track.

The connection to the flour mill "Swiss Mill" is the last remnant of a hugh network of tracks in the former industrial hub of Zurich. It is very amusing to watch (especially if a car tries to "honk" the train away), it is only an industrial spur and very short.

These days a considerable portion of all yard tracks in Switzerland are without a catenary and are only used with diesel or hybrid engines.

The most notable portions in regard of "unelectrified" are the following:

  • the old line between "Solothurn" and "Büren a.A.", the line was closed and the catenary removed years ago and is only used to access some remnant industry
  • there is a unelectrified railway between Sursee and Triengen, it is an unfinished line without bigger meaning and can be considered as a industrial spur
  • the old line connecting Switzerland to Germany between Etzwilen and Singen, this line was never electrified, passenger transport ended a long time ago and freight transport about 20 years ago, this line is now in the capable hands of enthusiasts and was refurbished in it complete length and is used for small steam and diesel trains
  • narrow gauge (cog): I just have to mention the old railway over the Furka pass which was refurbished in the last 40 years (without catenary). Traction is provided by beautifuly restored steam locomotives (some returned from Vietnam in the 80s) and some 40 year of diesel locomotives

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