Why where the fronts of early streamlined first generation diesels regard to as "bulldog noses."

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Why where the fronts of early streamlined first generation diesels regard to as "bulldog noses."
Posted by Engi1487 on Friday, September 11, 2020 6:38 PM

The smooth streamlined front noses of locomotives build in the early first streamlined generation diesels in both North America and the rest of the world are referred to as "Bulldog Noses," But I have to ask where this term came from. I cant even see the front of a real bulldogs face when I look at a diesel of said example.

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Posted by Overmod on Friday, September 11, 2020 7:12 PM

They mean mashed-up and short, like a Bulldog Mack hood.  As opposed to the long slant nose of pre-E7 EMD passenger locomotives.  In an era where the dominant nose metaphors were long hooded cars and ship prows, it is not surprising that 'bulldog' and 'babyface' were notable...

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Posted by tdmidget on Friday, September 11, 2020 8:10 PM

Does it look more like Lassie or Uga?

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Posted by blue streak 1 on Saturday, September 12, 2020 7:36 PM

Alcoa PAs  were definitely not bulldog.

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Posted by daveklepper on Saturday, September 12, 2020 7:50 PM

nor DL-109s

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Sunday, September 13, 2020 8:10 AM

Engi1487
But I have to ask where this term came from.

Well, there are times when the the machine, the nick-name, and the moment just come together.  Someone called it a "bulldog" nose and the name stuck.

Big steam locomotives were commonly referred to as "Big Boys" before the UP's 4-8-8-4 came along, but when some unknown shop worker at Alco chalked "Big Boy" on the smokebox of the first one the name stuck, and stuck hard. 

Stuff just happens, you know?

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Posted by BaltACD on Sunday, September 13, 2020 9:37 AM

blue streak 1
Alcoa PAs  were definitely not bulldog.

In comparison to the PA, the FA's could be considered the 'bulldog' variant of the Alco line.

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Sunday, September 13, 2020 10:01 AM

BaltACD
 
blue streak 1
Alcoa PAs  were definitely not bulldog.

 

In comparison to the PA, the FA's could be considered the 'bulldog' variant of the Alco line.

 
Also compare the nose on the World Locomotive.
Note the GM export in the consist.
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Posted by BigJim on Monday, September 14, 2020 4:01 PM

I don't think "bulldog" is the proper term to describe the nose of those diesels. And, I don't think "Sharknose" is the proper term for the nose of any diesel or steam loco!

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, September 14, 2020 5:07 PM

BigJim
And, I don't think "Sharknose" is the proper term for the nose of any diesel or steam loco!

Keep in mind that "Sharknose" had a very different connotation in the late '40s -- the Graham Sharknose automobile was a recent memory, and the connection with the kind of nose art made famous by P40s was probably near-immediate.  As used then, it referred to the 'reverse rake' of the pointed nose.

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Posted by BigJim on Monday, September 14, 2020 9:25 PM

Overmod

 

 
BigJim
And, I don't think "Sharknose" is the proper term for the nose of any diesel or steam loco!

 

Keep in mind that "Sharknose" had a very different connotation in the late '40s -- the Graham Sharknose automobile was a recent memory, and the connection with the kind of nose art made famous by P40s was probably near-immediate.  As used then, it referred to the 'reverse rake' of the pointed nose.

 

 

20's, 30's, 40's or whenever, it still doesn't look like a shark's nose to me. More like a Submarine.

And, remember, those P-40's were more commonly known as the "Flying Tigers".

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Posted by 54light15 on Tuesday, September 15, 2020 9:02 AM

Actually only the American Volunteer Group (AVG) that fought in China before the U.S. entry to the war were the Flying Tigers. The teeth painted on the front of the aircraft were supposed to scare the enemy into giving up. Didn't work, though. The British Commonweath and Russians were big fans of the P-40; the Brits used them to good effect in North Africa. 

Regarding the Sharknose Grahams, they were influential in the styling of several custom-bodied French cars of that era such as Delages and Delahayes. I think they're ugly but they have their fans. 

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