Help: Identify this switcher

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  • Member since
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  • From: Festus, MO
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Help: Identify this switcher
Posted by Mykhalin on Thursday, June 07, 2018 11:39 AM

 

 

The photo below is of St Francois County Railroad #6, a diesel switcher bought in late 1946 or early 1947. We know from a newspaper article that this photo was a part of that it was a center cab with a pair of 150hp diesel engines, and that it cost the railroad $30,000. What we don't know, and cannot seem to figure out, is its builder and model number. The "we" I refer to includes the two most knowledgeable historians of this tiny Missouri railroad.

Any help in identifying this critter would be greatly appreciated.

~AJ Kleipass

 

 
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Posted by RailEagle on Thursday, June 07, 2018 1:36 PM

Appears to be a GE 45-Ton Switcher. The date that it was acquired could also indicate that it was built new.

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Posted by NorthWest on Thursday, June 07, 2018 2:28 PM

Based on the hood shape, I'm pretty certain that it's not a GE. It's a 44 ton model, but Porter, Whitcomb and Davenport all made similar looking models at about the same time, which makes it hard. It would be nice to have a closer look at the hoods and trucks.

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Posted by mudchicken on Friday, June 08, 2018 1:45 AM

Bad enough that he found a 10 mile interurban in SE Missouri (Farmington) that supposedly only survived 1904-1957 (Dieselized in 1947 and was freight only by then - the OH electric had failed) which would make that loco one of the early first Porters surplus-ed after WW2 (Kinda looks like Navy#2 of 1940 in DSG...the steps, the grille, lightly sloping hoods and the cab)

That picture is quite a find. (somebody got the early X2200S issues on diesel mice?) 

Mudchicken Nothing is worth taking the risk of losing a life over. Come home tonight in the same condition that you left home this morning in. Safety begins with ME.... cinscocom-west
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Posted by HR616 on Sunday, June 10, 2018 10:22 AM

Well I did some research on 44 tonners and am pretty sure this is a Davenport unit. The front grille and hood appear to be very similar to other pictures of Davenports that I found online. The cab looks somewhat similar as well.

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Posted by DAVID WALTON on Monday, June 11, 2018 7:40 PM

That is definitely a GE 44-Tonner !!!! 

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Posted by T T FETTERS on Tuesday, June 12, 2018 12:28 PM

The company was founded in 1901.  The first trip was on July 24, 1904. 

They had purchased a locomotive from E F Wickham Coal & Coke Co in St Louis in 1907. 

The initial route was from Farmington to Delasus and a connectiuon with the Iron Mountain RR.  Then a branch to the Mississippi River,  then a line to Bonne Terre RR at Flat River, then to the Illinois Southern at Esshen. MO.

The depot, seen in the photo was at 125 North Washinton St in Farmington.

It was originally the St. Francois Electric Railroad Company.  

In the late 1920's they hauled 75,000 tons of freight per year.  

See Survey Report, 29-02  #17555-575 for Farmington, MO.

Railroad History had a short article in issue 122 on page 37.  

All above from Wikipedia and the Farmington Survey.  

 

Tom Fetters

 

 

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Posted by samfp1943 on Tuesday, June 12, 2018 10:01 PM

T T FETTERS

The company was founded in 1901.  The first trip was on July 24, 1904. 

They had purchased a locomotive from E F Wickham Coal & Coke Co in St Louis in 1907. 

The initial route was from Farmington to Delasus and a connectiuon with the Iron Mountain RR.  Then a branch to the Mississippi River,  then a line to Bonne Terre RR at Flat River, then to the Illinois Southern at Esshen. MO.

The depot, seen in the photo was at 125 North Washinton St in Farmington.

It was originally the St. Francois Electric Railroad Company.  

In the late 1920's they hauled 75,000 tons of freight per year.  

See Survey Report, 29-02  #17555-575 for Farmington, MO.

Railroad History had a short article in issue 122 on page 37.  

All above from Wikipedia and the Farmington Survey.  

 

Tom Fetters

 

 

 

Tom Fetters (TTFETTERS): 

The area roughly described in your post seems to pretty much overlay, and is intertwined within the  SEMO area, often referred to as "The Lead Belt".  It is an interesting history, and the railroads of that area were used to transport the raw, and refined products of the lead belt to various smelters in the area.  The following linked site @   https://www.revolvy.com/main/index.php?s=Mississippi%20River%20and%20Bonne%20Terre%20Railway

The railroads are the Mississippi River and Bonne Terre Railway[ MR&BTRwy] and also a link to the St.Louis and Iron Mountain &Southern Rwy Co. [ @ linked site] @:https://www.revolvy.com/main/index.php?s=St.+Louis,+Iron+Mountain+and+Southern+Railway

The StLIM&S  has an interesting history of its own.

 The one stumbling point I found was the town mentioned as DELASUS(?).  I am wondering if this may be an error of pronunciation?  The MB&BT was also served by a 36" NG line built in 1880 as the St.Joseph and DesLoge Railway from Bonne Terre west to Summit, it was owned in part by St. Joseph Lead and the Desloge Family Company. linked site @  https://www.revolvy.com/main/index.php?s=Desloge+Consolidated+Lead+Company

The Desloge family, and name are French in origin...Pretty obvious, as to that connedtion in that area of Missouri.

You and others may find this following linked suite of interest as well, for the railroads of SE Missouri. It is a history of the Missouri-Illinois Railroad, and a member of the Missouri Pacific RR family from 1929 , as was the MR&BT.

see linked site @ http://www.r2parks.net/M-I.html

And this link adds a little history to the railroad story south of St Louis where the rauilroads brough their freight for transfer to the river boats at Sulphir Springs Landing.   "Remembering Missouri's Worst Train Wreck" 

linked site @https://dailyjournalonline.com/news/local/remembering-missouri-s-worst-train-wreck/article_2b82d998-d860-11e1-8ece-001a4bcf887a.html

and from a TRAINS Forum of 2013 Thread: "Old Frisco Spur from Cuba, Mo thru Steelville,Mo to Boss,Mo."  see linked @   http://cs.trains.com/trn/f/111/t/220054.aspx

 

 

Sam

 

 


 

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Posted by SD70Dude on Tuesday, June 12, 2018 10:25 PM

HR616

Well I did some research on 44 tonners and am pretty sure this is a Davenport unit. The front grille and hood appear to be very similar to other pictures of Davenports that I found online. The cab looks somewhat similar as well.

Like this MILW unit:

https://www.american-rails.com/images/DVPT997.jpg

Note the bell and step locations, and the small circular thing (class light?) on the side of the hood near its end.

Does anyone have access to Davenport's records?

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by SD70Dude on Tuesday, June 12, 2018 10:47 PM

Also, considering the date, could the unit have been bought used from the military?

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by T T FETTERS on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 5:35 PM

Delassus seems to have been three miles south of Farmington.   

Chrck Don Ross Collection for photos of Car#50, aMcGuire-Cummings unit bought secondhand.  It seemsto be more freight than passenger, but typical interurban of the time.  It is at the Farmington depot.  It has a railroad roof.  

Also see Don Ross Collection for Car #54 at Farmington.  It is a combination car with a freight door midway and six window passenger section to the rear.  It has an arch roof and seems to be the principal car used.  Photo from Feruary 7, 1938 by Bob Hanft.  

Tom Fetters

 

 

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Posted by SD70Dude on Sunday, June 17, 2018 2:02 PM

Well, I posted this question on the Railway Preservation News forum and got a match:

http://www.rypn.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=42117&sid=f4df34a42f842eb16aff179509e189f8

Hope this ends your search.

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by LensCapOn on Friday, June 22, 2018 9:36 AM

This site is very useful for basic information on small and industrial units. Spend some time on it and enjoy.

 

http://www.northeast.railfan.net/industrial.html

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