Please Identify New Zealand Loco

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  • Member since
    April, 2018
  • 5 posts
Please Identify New Zealand Loco
Posted by BruceMaison on Thursday, April 12, 2018 9:36 AM

I am an earthquake researcher in San Francisco, California who is studying the toppling of locomotives during earthquakes.  I need help finding information about a New Zealand loco that tipped over during a 1987 earthquake.  Please see photos in links below.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Locomotives_of_New_Zealand

http://www.TeAra.govt.nz/en/photograph/4536/twisted-railway-tracks-edgecumbe

http://kpitau.blogspot.com/2015/08/


I think Loco 4749 is Class DC or DCP.  Please confirm. 

Please advise where I can find:

1.  Loco weight

2.  Loco dimensions (length, height, width)

3.  Drawings showing side and front views

Thank-you very much 

  • Member since
    January, 2002
  • 3,388 posts
Posted by M636C on Thursday, April 12, 2018 8:45 PM

BruceMaison

I am an earthquake researcher in San Francisco, California who is studying the toppling of locomotives during earthquakes.  I need help finding information about a New Zealand loco that tipped over during a 1987 earthquake.  Please see photos in links below.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Locomotives_of_New_Zealand

http://www.TeAra.govt.nz/en/photograph/4536/twisted-railway-tracks-edgecumbe

http://kpitau.blogspot.com/2015/08/


I think Loco 4749 is Class DC or DCP.  Please confirm. 

Please advise where I can find:

1.  Loco weight

2.  Loco dimensions (length, height, width)

3.  Drawings showing side and front views

Thank-you very much 

 

 

Firstly, there is no difference between a DC and a DCP.

The different classification referred only to the locomotive being allocated to passenger trains. It could be used for freight when not required by the passenger operator.

Your best bet is to search online for the Electro-Motive type G-12.

New Zealand was the biggest customer for these, buying 146 as class DA.

These were rebuilt as class DC during the late 1970s.

The changes that were made, although extensive did not affect the  locomotive dimensions or weight in any significant way, so the details you could obtain of a standard EMD G-12 would be quite suitable for any studies based on weight and dimensions.

These locomotives are 1067mm (3' 6") gauge. The G12 was supplied for many different gauges.

These locomotives use two motor three axle EMD "Flexicoil" trucks with the centre axle unpowered. The trucks carry a bolster with the weight taken through a centre pivot.

The major changes made to the locomotive in conversion from DA to DC were:

A new cab with lower nose was fitted.

The dynamic brake resistors were moved from the nose to behind the cab.

An alternator with companion alternator replaced the DC generator.

The engines were rebuilt with 645 power assemblies increasing the displacement. This did not alter the weight significantly.

The radiator cooling fan was altered from mechanical drive to AC motor drive.

None of these changes significantly altered the weight or weight distribution.

I have (somewhere) a contemporary brochure from Clyde Engineering who rebuilt these locomotives in the late 1970s which includes an A4 (quarto) size reproduction of the general arrangement of the rebuilt class DC and lists the dimensions and weights.

But I'd have to find it and scan it, which I won't be able to do for at least a few days.

Meantime, if you find the details of the standard EMD G12 on 3'6" gauge, I'm sure that would be accurate enough for your purposes.

Try approaching Progress Rail directly. They should have all of the details you require, and should make them available for a legitamate academic study.

Peter

  • Member since
    January, 2002
  • 3,388 posts
Posted by M636C on Thursday, April 12, 2018 9:47 PM

Here is a typical G12 as built:

http://vfco.brazilia.jor.br/diesel/sr6/img/g12a1aVFRGSpaintManfrin.gif

The dimensions won't change. This loco is 1000 gauge, not 1067...

http://vfco.brazilia.jor.br/locos/imgSR6/04-G12-A1A.gif

This shows typical weights, again for a metre gauge unit.

I think the NZ units were set up with 15 (long) tons on each driving axle.

Peter

  • Member since
    April, 2018
  • 5 posts
Posted by BruceMaison on Tuesday, April 17, 2018 3:56 PM

Peter:

Thank-you very much for the info.

Bruce 

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