Resurrected War Bonnet

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Resurrected War Bonnet
Posted by Yard Limit on Saturday, March 17, 2018 7:37 AM

On March 13, 2018, I saw Amtrak 4 come and go on the Flagstaff webcam and it was on time and had a normal consist.  Between Winslow and Gallup it lost about an hour and 40 minutes which was very unusual so I listened on the scanner as it was arriving in NMRX territory to see if there was a clue to it’s tardiness.  Sure enough, when the crew reported in to the NMRX dispatcher they had to change the GTB to BNSF 614.  Somewhere between Winslow and Gallup one of the locomotives had mechanical problems and a BNSF unit was dispatched to assist.  This is a fairly rare occurrence and makes for an interesting video.
By the time it was due to pass through Bernalillo, I heard the dispatcher tell the crew that it would meet the Southbound Railrunner, which was a nice added element for me.  Amtrak 4 didn’t have to wait long for the Railrunner to pass before it throttled up and continued its journey toward Chicago.
BNSF 614 started life as an EMD CW44-9 AT&SF Warbonnet but was converted to an AC44C4M around 2015.  It now sports the BNSF livery. 

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Posted by K. P. Harrier on Wednesday, March 28, 2018 8:29 AM

Where is the resurrected warbonnet as per your tread's title?

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- K.P.’s absolute “theorem” from early, early childhood that he has seen over and over and over again: Those that CAUSE a problem in the first place will act the most violently if questioned or exposed.

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Posted by Yard Limit on Wednesday, March 28, 2018 9:38 AM

BNSF 614 as per the description. 

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Posted by mudchicken on Wednesday, March 28, 2018 11:21 AM

(Just another H3/GN Uh Orange locomotive - "newsworkers" at it again.)

Mudchicken Nothing is worth taking the risk of losing a life over. Come home tonight in the same condition that you left home this morning in. Safety begins with ME.... cinscocom-west
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Posted by K. P. Harrier on Wednesday, March 28, 2018 1:31 PM

The picture above shows BNSF 614 in an orange and green scheme with dirty trucks, suggesting if it was in storage (many 600’s were) it was placed back in service without the trucks being cleaned, which would suggest the unit was put in storage as an orange and green unit.  The concept of a warbonnet unit being resurrected is not exactly true, hence, irrelevant.   If this tread’s title said ‘Resurrection of a Pumpkin Unit,’ that would make sense, but even then the resurrection concept suggests a bringing back to life taking place, but the latter part of the video suggests an after the fact situation.  A warbonnet, though?  I don’t think so … And, what does the New Mexico Rail Runner train (a big part of the video) have to do with a warped resurrection concept?

Obviously, you’ve never written a term paper in high school or college, unless you did a really poor job at it.  You might learn to write one correctly before your next video effort.  Once you have the term paper concept really down pat, and apply what you learn to making videos, I’m sure your videos will be a great success.  You’ve got potential!

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- K.P.’s absolute “theorem” from early, early childhood that he has seen over and over and over again: Those that CAUSE a problem in the first place will act the most violently if questioned or exposed.

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Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, March 28, 2018 3:06 PM

K. P. Harrier
The concept of a warbonnet unit being resurrected is not exactly true, hence, irrelevant.

And meanwhile, as noted on LocoNotes this morning, the Laz Effect for nearly all the SD60s continues ... the latest supposition I saw being that BNSF is holding off for some sort of rebuilding program.  And K.P., wasn't it you that had a picture of someplace like Keller Yard stuffed chock-full of red-and-silver Warbonnet 600s quite recently?

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Posted by YoHo1975 on Thursday, March 29, 2018 10:33 AM

If we wanted to get pedantic, only the original passenger scheme is considered the Warbonnet.

The 600s wore the Superfleet scheme.

 

I feel like this thread is laying it on a little thick with the OP. 614 was one of the units rebuilt from AC to DC. She's an AC44C4M now.

 

So, actually, yes, she is resurrected and that's a valid description. She was wearing her Superfleet scheme when she went in.

So, the OP is on target.

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Posted by Yard Limit on Thursday, March 29, 2018 4:43 PM
Thank you!
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Posted by K. P. Harrier on Thursday, March 29, 2018 10:55 PM

YoHo1975 (3-29):

YoHo1975

If we wanted to get pedantic, only the original passenger scheme is considered the Warbonnet.

The 600s wore the Superfleet scheme.

 

I feel like this thread is laying it on a little thick with the OP. 614 was one of the units rebuilt from AC to DC. She's an AC44C4M now.

 

So, actually, yes, she is resurrected and that's a valid description. She was wearing her Superfleet scheme when she went in.

So, the OP is on target.

 

A little background info works wonders for understanding a perspective.  Thanks, YoHo1975.

In the legal system a prosecutor often closes with the details and a review of the facts to prove a person is guilty.  The defending attorney outlines facts to prove the defendant is innocent.  Both go out of their way to make their cases, and then it goes to the jury.  Here at the forums there are a variety of orientations, backgrounds, and perspectives, and sometimes it is good to make sure what one posts is understood by others.

Now that we have that cleared up, I am at a total loss about the large New Mexico commuter train portion of the video in question and its relationship to BNSF 614.  Did I totally miss something on that too?

K.P.

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Posted by Leo_Ames on Friday, March 30, 2018 12:32 AM

Never heard of the Warbonnet paint scheme being called the Super Fleet paint scheme just because it was on a safety cab equipped hood unit with the Santa Fe billboard lettering on her long hood.

Super Fleet was just the nickname coined by Santa Fe for the fleet of new Warbonnet painted Santa Fe power with the GP60M's and B40-8's, introduced by the FP45's when they pioneered this Warbonnet variant when restored to Santa Fe passenger colors.

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Friday, March 30, 2018 6:46 AM

The way I see it, BNSF 614 went into the shop in some iteration of Warbonnet colors, got heavily rebuilt and came out in orange and green.  The locomotive may have been resurrected, but not as a warbonnet.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by YoHo1975 on Friday, March 30, 2018 11:24 AM

It doesn't need to be resurrected AS a warbonnet to be a resurrected Warbonnet. Also, the OP put the info on the rebuild in his post. Apparently everyone was too upset there was no Warbonnet to read the post. It also explains why the Railrunner was part of the video.

 

Lastly, yes, people are sticklers for labels. Warbonnet in the strictest sense ONLY refers to the Passenger scheme with the Railroad Roman small Santa Fe lettering. Superfleet means that scheme but with the large Cooper Black lettering. That's the ATSF name for units in that scheme and therefore, that's the scheme name. The railroad gets to decide.

 

I don't know that ATSF had official names for any other scheme. The Bookend scheme was a fan name. Yellowbonnet means the Yellow and Silver experiment on some F units. Bluebonnet means the Blue and Silver scheme. Here's a classic trains thread on the topic http://cs.trains.com/ctr/f/3/p/136177/1531170.aspx

The popular 1972+ yellow and blue bonnet scheme has no consistent name I've heard of. Fans will call it Yellow bonnet or Blue bonnet, but those really only refer to the F-unit passenger repaints. I've been told that ATSF Texas based employees referred to them as "Cub Scouts" as they do look like the shirt and bandanna of a Wolf Scout.

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Posted by Leo_Ames on Friday, March 30, 2018 10:26 PM

Again, the railroad didn't call the paint scheme that.

Super Fleet was Santa Fe's nickname for their new fleet of Warbonnet painted freight power introduced circa 1990, not for the locomotive paint scheme itself. 

That's like saying that the Central's two tone gray Lightning Stripe passenger scheme should be called "Great Steel Fleet Gray" or something. Nobody called the Warbonnet paint scheme variant introduced back then what you're saying they do, let alone the Santa Fe in some official capacity.

It was the Santa Fe's label for the fleet of modern Warbonnet painted power as a whole, using for marketing purposes that was tied in with Santa Fe resurrecting their passenger colors on freight power. 

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Posted by YoHo1975 on Saturday, March 31, 2018 1:10 AM

The Santa Fe may or may not have called it the Superfleet Paint Scheme, but I would be shocked if they called it the Warbonnet officially. It was called the Passenger Paint scheme. At least in the below linked RMC article. At least in the late 80s.

Your insistence that NOBODY called it the Superfleet Paint Scheme is disproved by a simple google search.

http://atsf.railfan.net/atsfpres/atsf95.html

"It was the only FP45 not repainted into SPSF red and yellow during the Southern Pacific-Santa Fe merger attempt in 1985-86, and it was the last unit to be repainted in Superfleet red and silver,"

 

Railroads Illustrated? Can We talk about them here? http://railroadsillustrated.com/early-bnsf/

"Santa Fe entered the merger with two locomotive paint schemes: the blue and yellow “Yellowbonnet” and the red and silver “Super Fleet” or “Warbonnet” scheme."

Steve Emerson uses the term when discussing the RMC article on the superfleet here:

http://steveemerson.qstation.org/birth.html

"ATSF CEO Mike Haverty and another railroad official about the birth of the Super Fleet Paint Scheme."

You'll note that Mike Martin, Director of Public relations for ATSF in 1993 used the term Warbonnet in relation to the 1972 scheme, but never the Superfleet scheme in the article.

http://railroadfan.com/wiki/index.php/FP45 He made a splash in the railroad world by reintroducing Santa Fe's famed "Warbonnet" paint scheme (this time dubbed "Superfleet", differing from the old warbonnet in that instead of small "Santa Fe" in roman text along the long hood, "Santa Fe" was spelled out in large red lettering across the engine compartment doors) on locomotives, and the FP45's were the first locomotives to wear it.

 

I mean, in a literal sense,the scheme is the FP45 Warbonnet Scheme, but with the Cooper Black Lettering from the U28CG Warbonnet since that's literally what was presented to Haverty in model form. (The U28 had some distinctive Yellow Applications that make it unique. )

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