F125 in the Darkness with Florescent Light Coming OUT of it (w/ Photos)

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F125 in the Darkness with Florescent Light Coming OUT of it (w/ Photos)
Posted by K. P. Harrier on Friday, October 20, 2017 8:07 PM

A new F125 was seen this morning (Friday, October 20, 2017) before sun up, with the large screened COMPARTMENT behind the prime mover all lit up!

Was that lit up a fluke or a new standard?

From the above scene in San Bernardino, CA, the two-unit power will push-pull push the Metrolink all the way to Los Angeles on the San Bernardino Line which is about 57 miles to Union Station.

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Posted by blue streak 1 on Friday, October 20, 2017 9:43 PM

Look at the advantages of the light.

Might prevent some idiot from running into side of loco or trailing train cars ?

Enables better walk arounds of locos ?

For our rail viewing fans at night it will light up the adjaecent ROW.  

Help for loading baggage at night.

Engineer(s) better vision at night when walking off platforms.

Cannot let chargers out do them ?  Anyone know  which has more light ?

Other?

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Posted by K. P. Harrier on Saturday, October 21, 2017 8:33 AM

A source confirms the F125’s run with the behind the engine area compartment lights ON.

The florescent-like look of those lights undoubtedly is from a mild bluish Light Emitting Diodes (LED) lighting

The headlight, ditch lights, and front number boards have that mild bluish look in contrast to the historic incandescent white-yellow.

The above view is from a highly cropped digital photo.

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Posted by VOLKER LANDWEHR on Saturday, October 21, 2017 9:01 AM

The PRIIA 305 specification requires LED or fluorescent lights for the engine room.

Required is a 30 second off delay following the last detected movement of personnel. So it seems a railroad decision to leave the engine room lights burning.
Regards, Volker

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Posted by Paul of Covington on Saturday, October 21, 2017 12:25 PM

K. P. Harrier
The headlight, ditch lights, and front number boards have that mild bluish look in contrast to the historic incandescent white-yellow.

   This is something that has concerned me since cars went from sealed-beam to halogen headlights, and now, LED.   Remember yellow fog lights?   The longer wavelength yellowish light is better at penetrating fog or mist, since the shorter wavelengths are scattered more by the droplets in the fog.   The bluish light appears brighter, but I wonder if it may actually be a disadvantage.

_____________

   My mind's made up.   Don't confuse me with the facts.

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Posted by ATSFGuy on Sunday, October 29, 2017 2:07 AM

I agree, those headlights on the F125's don't look very bright during the day, but might be easier to see at night. 

I wonder what the engineers are saying about these new hi tec locomotives. 

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Posted by Deggesty on Monday, October 30, 2017 2:07 PM

I could have used such lights 48 years ago when I walked back to my coach, going through two E8 engine rooms on the way. The flagman had accompanied to the cab of the lead engine, and then he went back, carrying his flashlight with him.Smile

Johnny

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Posted by zugmann on Monday, October 30, 2017 6:00 PM

ATSFGuy
I agree, those headlights on the F125's don't look very bright during the day, but might be easier to see at night.

The LED headlights the new amtrak electric motors have are pretty bright, day or night.

The opinions expressed here represent my own and not those of my employer or any other railroad, company, or person.

I occasionally post off-topic remarks.  Adults can handle that.

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Posted by blue streak 1 on Monday, November 20, 2017 8:49 PM

Maybe it needs to crawl back into the dark ?  Anotheer tier 4 failure much like tractors for trailers ?

https://signalscv.com/2017/11/metrolinks-tier-4-locomotive-unveiling-stopped-in-its-tracks/

 

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Posted by YoHo1975 on Monday, November 20, 2017 8:58 PM

No indication of what the problem was. Maybe it was the PTC system? Based on the description of being stalled for a long time, then moving, the stalling then moving. 

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Posted by GERALD L MCFARLANE JR on Monday, November 20, 2017 9:09 PM

LED are far superior to flourescent lights in terms of brightness and visibility and a considerable savings in energy consumption, not to mention life span.  They're also just as visible during the daytime as at night, and the only reason people are blinded by them is because they probably weren't installed correctly(if you're headlamps are adjusted to point downward like they're supposed to be you won't have them shining directly in your mirror, that's another advantage of LED's, they're very directional without much bleeding).

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Posted by BaltACD on Saturday, November 25, 2017 3:10 PM

K. P. Harrier
A source confirms the F125’s run with the behind the engine area compartment lights ON.

The florescent-like look of those lights undoubtedly is from a mild bluish Light Emitting Diodes (LED) lighting

The headlight, ditch lights, and front number boards have that mild bluish look in contrast to the historic incandescent white-yellow.

The above view is from a highly cropped digital photo.

I wonder how much snow and ice the LED's will melt in the winter?

         

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Posted by Shadow the Cats owner on Saturday, November 25, 2017 3:34 PM

We run them in all our trailers and have next to no issues with snow buildup on the lens covers.  They do radiate heat just not as much as a incandescent or even halogen bulb.  Also in So Cal snow and ice is not much of problem it is not like they are crossing Donner in winter.

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Posted by BaltACD on Saturday, November 25, 2017 9:23 PM

Shadow the Cats owner
We run them in all our trailers and have next to no issues with snow buildup on the lens covers.  They do radiate heat just not as much as a incandescent or even halogen bulb.  Also in So Cal snow and ice is not much of problem it is not like they are crossing Donner in winter.

No - but as they are indicative of things to come - at some point that lighting system will be operating over Donner in winter - also operating over the plains at speed in the snow, if there isn't enough heat the light becomes caked over with accumulated snow.

         

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, November 27, 2017 10:42 AM

BaltACD
if there isn't enough heat the light becomes caked over with accumulated snow.

This might be easily addressed by circulating air or dry nitrogen from the heatsinking on the LED elements across the inside of the transparent cover over the arrays.  There is plenty of heat from this power of LED, but the design emphasis so far has been on removing it from the devices as expediently as possible in ways that do not block the light emission substantially.

Be interesting to see how much of a problem this turns out to be, and what manufacturers or owners do to address it in practice.

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Posted by Shadow the Cats owner on Monday, November 27, 2017 12:03 PM

How the OTR industry solved the heatsink venting problem was simplcity in itself.  The housing is the heatsink for us and that for our tailights is riveted to the trailer body itself.  In the 5 years we have been running LED's for brake and taillights on all trailers along with marker lights our drivers actually have reported less problems with ice and snow buildup.  Why the mounting area is actually warmer around the light and keeps the snow from sticking as easy.

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Posted by Enzoamps on Wednesday, November 29, 2017 4:53 AM

Traffic signals on our roads are going LED, and in colder climes like Michigan, they are already finding that previously the 100 watt bulb would melt snow off the light, but the LED lights run cool, so snow can gather, obscuring that red or green light.

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