F125 goes into full service

1069 views
9 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • 4,136 posts
F125 goes into full service
Posted by Overmod on Friday, October 13, 2017 11:32 AM

I don’t know if this belongs here or in Transit, but will leave it to someone else to post it over there in context.

According to LocoNotes, a F125 Spirit has finally run ‘solo’ on Metrolinx - SCAX 908, running trains 314,335 and 336 to San Berdoo yesterday.  It will be interesting to see how quickly  other units enter service, and how they perform.

  • Member since
    November, 2015
  • 920 posts
Posted by ATSFGuy on Friday, October 13, 2017 8:07 PM

Metrolink ordered about 40 of them back in 2013. I'm not sure how many of them are on the property or being tested right now.

  • Member since
    January, 2015
  • 955 posts
Posted by kgbw49 on Saturday, October 14, 2017 12:42 AM
  • Member since
    September, 2013
  • 1,839 posts
Posted by Miningman on Saturday, October 14, 2017 12:20 PM

I suppose in time, a lot of time, we will come around, and learn to love this styling. That front end looks like a sea creature, shrimpy. 

Why did the carbody design have to be designed by a Spanish company. Vossloh Rail Services?  We, ummm, EMD, Caterpillar, Progress  Rail,  don't know how to do this any more?

Oh yes, it's a global world society now, everything's in the cloud...I forgot. 

  • Member since
    October, 2003
  • 7,673 posts
Posted by K. P. Harrier on Saturday, October 14, 2017 2:01 PM

I visited the Metrolink San Bernardino stop yesterday, and saw no F125’s, only the older power:

Maybe things will work out next Friday that I could spend the day there.  Surely one F125 will be by …

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- It is believed that the overpowering stench of photobucket.com is what killed me! Coming to you from the afterlife … On the other hand, PostImage.io is cool!
  • Member since
    January, 2002
  • 3,097 posts
Posted by M636C on Saturday, October 14, 2017 5:41 PM

Miningman

I suppose in time, a lot of time, we will come around, and learn to love this styling. That front end looks like a sea creature, shrimpy. 

Why did the carbody design have to be designed by a Spanish company. Vossloh Rail Services?  We, ummm, EMD, Caterpillar, Progress  Rail,  don't know how to do this any more?

Oh yes, it's a global world society now, everything's in the cloud...I forgot. 

 
Vossloh is a German Steel Company. The subsidiary in Spain that builds EMD locomotives for use in Europe has had a number of owners and names over the past few years. They have sold a number of locomotives with similiar construction to the F125s to the UK and in Spain. It is probably cheaper to build the bodies in Spain, than to set up to build a small number in Muncie.
 
Peter
  • Member since
    September, 2013
  • 1,839 posts
Posted by Miningman on Saturday, October 14, 2017 6:18 PM

Great info..thanks Peter/M636C.

Still say the head on look presents a face only a mother would love.

Hope they achieve good reliable service and long service lives. 

  • Member since
    November, 2013
  • 284 posts
Posted by VOLKER LANDWEHR on Sunday, October 15, 2017 4:10 AM

M636C
Vossloh is a German Steel Company.

Vossloh is primarily a railroad infrastructure company. They deliver rail fastening systems, concrete ties, concrete crossing panels, turnout systems, signaling systems and products, and locomotives. After selling the Valencia facility to Stadler they still produce switching locomotives: https://www.vossloh.com/en/

If I remember correctly all semi-monocoque structural designs for American passenger locomotives beginning with GE's Genesis P40 came from Europe. Only exception maybe the MPI locomotives. For the MPI locomotives I didn't find a source telling who did the semi-monocoque structural design.

Deutsche Bahn hasn't excepted six axle locomotives for quite some years. With lower axle loads European manufacturers were forced to built light and use semi-monocoques even on freight locomotives.

The CEM elements on the F 125 come from Vossloh too. Because our our different crashworthiness requirements (lower buff load, more crash energy management) companies like Vossloh and Siemens have CEM experience that American companies don't have to this extent.

Same goes for high speed trucks with truck-suspended traction motors.
Regards, Volker

  • Member since
    December, 2006
  • 1,315 posts
Posted by YoHo1975 on Sunday, October 15, 2017 9:15 PM

I didn't think the MPI locos WERE monocoques. I thought they were cowels like the FP45 and F40/59/59PHI. In any case, The answer is Simple, EMD (and GE) didn't know how to do it, because the number of passenger locomotives purchased is small, so maintaining R&D staff to do that design was not cost effective. That's part of why the Cowel designs came about in the first place.

  • Member since
    November, 2013
  • 284 posts
Posted by VOLKER LANDWEHR on Monday, October 16, 2017 4:40 AM

You are right, EMD ang GE would have been able to do it, but with a long learning curve and high risk of failure. It was an economical decision.

The monocoque (or semi-) are very similar to the cab units. The skin takes over the task of the truss diagonals, like plate girder and truss bridges. The cowl came when ATSF didn't want road swichers for their premium passenger trains.

Regarding the MPI locomotive: I think I read somewhere they are monocoques but can't find it anymore. When ATSF ordered theit EMD GP60M they wanted a cowl unit, but axle load limits allowed only a wide cab road switcher. Perhaps that and 8' more length made me believe that MPI locomotives have a monocoque design

When GE built the Genesis P40 they used a monocoque for two reasons: Weight and height. According to a GE presentation the monocoque was 20.000 lbs lighter than with a heavy frame underbody.

If you compare weights of a P40 (268,000 lbs) and MPI MP40PH-3C (289,000 lbs) There is 21,000 lbs difference with the MPI having a separate HEP generator.

Perhaps a half-heartedly designed monocoque? I really don't know, what to believe.

I'll try to find the monocoque source this afternoon.
Regards, Volker

Join our Community!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

Newsletter Sign-Up

By signing up you may also receive occasional reader surveys and special offers from Trains magazine.Please view our privacy policy

Search the Community