News Wire: GE debuts first new Indian Railways locomotive

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Moderator
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Posted by Brian Schmidt on Thursday, August 03, 2017 10:22 AM

ERIE, Pa. — GE Transportation rolled out Indian Railways’ first Evolution Series locomotive from the paint stall, revealing the railroad's new paint scheme. The ES43ACmi (Indian Railways’ class - WDG4G) locomotive, painted in a dis...

http://trn.trains.com/news/news-wire/2017/08/03-ge-india

Brian Schmidt, Associate Editor Trains Magazine

RME
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Posted by RME on Thursday, August 03, 2017 10:57 AM

Someone please tell me more about the engine for the ES57ACi.  Is this still related to the Deutz 632/7HDL family (as evolved into GEVO) and if so, what, specifically, has been done to reduce the cavitation problems due to ultrasonic nodes in a relatively thin-wall cast engine block at the high horsepower?

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Posted by owlsroost on Thursday, August 03, 2017 12:04 PM

No inside knowledge at all, but didn't at least some of the CSX AC6000s get re-engined (following the original HDL engine problems) with effectively a V16 version of the V12 EVO engine - making them the equivalent of an ES60AC?

RME
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Posted by RME on Thursday, August 03, 2017 12:19 PM

owlsroost
didn't at least some of the CSX AC6000s get re-engined (following the original HDL engine problems) with effectively a V16 version of the V12 EVO engine

I thought they were actively derated to 12-cylinder GEVO engines: essentially changing the architecture to where you don't see the cavitation issues, in a way that gives you full parts and maintenance compatibility with 'all the other' locomotives when you don't have operational need for 6000hp units.  I think this goes along with the current thread on whether there are any domestic 7HDLs (or "GEVO" rebuilds of 16-cylinder 7HDLs) operating at their design 6000-hp rating; my assumption is 'no'.

The immediate question (and it is an extended question) is whether the 16-cylinder "GEVO" improvements have, in fact, relieved the cavitation issues, or perhaps more relevantly whether the crankcase detail design, fabrication method, etc. was improved to eliminate the ultrasonic vibrations or node concentration that were causing the bubble etching, or if some combination of internal coatings and coolant chemistry had practically relieved the erosion.  Clearly these engines were operating in Australia and China at some high percentage of their nominal crank hp, and I find it particularly notable that here is Indian Railways specifically building new examples (that, presumably, will not have issues at all).

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