Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum (photos)

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Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum (photos)
Posted by mfmalk on Wednesday, March 28, 2018 7:11 PM

http://www.losttracksoftime.com/p17739217

Follow the above link to my photos from the recent Lerro Productions photo charter at the Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum in Chattanooga.

 
The night before the charter started I was out past midnight for dinner and drinks with Pete Lerro and Mitch Goldman, we had a most interesting and stimulating conversation about reality based photography verses digital manipulation and compositing via Photoshop. I am one who always tries to capture the picture as perfectly as possible with the camera, but afterwards use a RAW editor and Photoshop to its fullest for finalizing the image files as my mind's eye wants them to appear. In talking with Pete and Mitch I secretly decided to challenge myself on this charter - to shoot in JPEG only, relying heavily on my camera platform's potential to process internally with the Acros monochrome film simulation mode. It would be a risky move, not having the flexible RAW files to fall back on if I did not ace the exposure settings. In some of these photos I purposely shot at a higher then normal ISO to accentuate the conversion of noise to an important texture, with others I underexposed the shadow areas to add contrast. A 50mm prime lens was used as much as possible to yield the field of view similar to the human eye, and as a throwback to my roots of analog photography.
 
In conducting this experiment of shooting JPEGs-only I really liked the results, to my tastes this gallery looks less sterile and digital while having a lot more soul. In Photoshop I severely limited myself to the amount of post-processing, doing only minimal tweaking; mainly dodging and burning. All of this has made me think seriously about steering clear of working with RAW for the near future. Less time sitting in front of a computer means more opportunity to be in the field with a camera.
 
Your thoughts?
 
Matthew
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Posted by seppburgh2 on Wednesday, March 28, 2018 10:12 PM

Way cool!  Back in the day use to compose in-camera (an Aragus "brick" camera) than do touch-up with in dark room.  Know what you mean with Photoshop, you did good.

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Posted by Firelock76 on Thursday, March 29, 2018 3:50 PM

Fantastic work Matthew, as always, just like a time machine.

Well, except for that shot of the guy with the drone, they didn't have them back in the 40's!

And to second seppburgh2, I too used to "edit with the camera" using my Argus C-3, still do for that matter when I do photograph anything.  Just waiting for that riiiiiiiiight moment to pull the trigger...

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Posted by kgbw49 on Thursday, March 29, 2018 5:28 PM

Firelock, Tony Stark’s dad might have been using drones back then. Top secret and all, you know!

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Posted by Firelock76 on Thursday, March 29, 2018 7:07 PM

Hmmmm, never thought of that.  The Starks have always been innovators, so it wouldn't surprise me.

Is Captain America around?  We could ask him!

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Posted by Penny Trains on Thursday, March 29, 2018 7:30 PM

You really do fantastic work, you know that don't you?  Big Smile  I wish I could take photos 1/1,000,000th as good as yours!  Bow

Big Smile  I'm Cuckoo For Choo Choo Stuffs!  Big Smile

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Posted by seppburgh2 on Thursday, March 29, 2018 10:09 PM
Yes that Argus "brick" of mine was a C-3! Felt good when I could shoot a GG1 coming at me at speed, a passing shot, and end of power shot all the time clicking and winding (for today's folks, one has to manually advance the film between shots.) Thanks for the memory jab.
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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Friday, March 30, 2018 6:50 AM

As mentioned elsewhere, a C-3 was my first 35mm camera.  I was pleasantly surprised to see a C-3 for sale in the window of La Grange camera about two weeks ago.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by Firelock76 on Friday, March 30, 2018 10:05 AM

CSSHEGEWISCH

As mentioned elsewhere, a C-3 was my first 35mm camera.  I was pleasantly surprised to see a C-3 for sale in the window of La Grange camera about two weeks ago.

 

My C-3 was originally my father's, he gave it to me back in 1973 when he bought a new Canon 35mm camera.  Dad's C-3 had the whole package, including the flash attachment that took those huge M3 and M5 flashbulbs.

I used it up to pretty recently at some family gatherings, just to amaze the kids who'd never seen anything like that, especially when those flashbulbs went "WHOOMPH!!!" and lit the whole room up!  "Wow," one of them said, "I can feel the heat all the way over here!"

You know, I never felt the need to upgrade to a more modern 35mm.  The C-3 did everything I wanted it to do, it was mechanical so I didn't have to worry about batterys, and I wasn't super serious about photography anyway, it was a strictly a for fun thing, especially when I pulled out the C-3 or any other of my antiques and saw the looks on peoples faces! 

And Becky, don't worry about being able to photograph as well as Matthew does, your handicraft and modeling skills amaze us all over at "Classic Toy Trains." 

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Posted by 54light15 on Friday, March 30, 2018 11:54 AM

I can only assume that film and developing chemicals are still available? 

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Friday, March 30, 2018 12:02 PM

54light15

I can only assume that film and developing chemicals are still available? 

 
You have to look a little bit but I know where I can buy film and at least two places where I can get it developed.
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Posted by Firelock76 on Friday, March 30, 2018 4:47 PM

CSSHEGEWISCH
 
54light15

I can only assume that film and developing chemicals are still available? 

 

 

 
You have to look a little bit but I know where I can buy film and at least two places where I can get it developed.
 

Same here, I usually compromise and go to Walgreens and get the Fuji 35mm and let them do the processing.  The real camera store up the road doesn't do film any more of any kind, it's all digital or nothing.

The even blew out the antique camera collection they had!

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Posted by Penny Trains on Friday, March 30, 2018 8:17 PM

Firelock76
And Becky, don't worry about being able to photograph as well as Matthew does, your handicraft and modeling skills amaze us all over at "Classic Toy Trains."

Thanks!  Wink

I used to have a lot of fun playing with this:

A sample:

120 film wasn't common back in the late 80's to early 90's when I was using it.  Can't imagine where I'd find any film let alone anyone to develop it these days.

Big Smile  I'm Cuckoo For Choo Choo Stuffs!  Big Smile

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Posted by Firelock76 on Friday, March 30, 2018 9:26 PM

Ah so, Yash-ka! 

Interesting, I didn't have too much trouble finding 120 film around here untill around 2000.  A lot of professionals were still using 120 up till that time and a lot of my antiques used it. 

One of my pride and joy antiques is an 1899 Kodak pocket folder.  It was made for the long-gone 105 film BUT I could use 120 in it by using the square format numbers that showed in the ruby window; pass 1, stop at 2, pass 3, stop at 4...

I'd get eight exposures on the roll.  However, today I have no idea where I'd get the film processed even if I could find it.  Digital's done a good job killing film just like videotape did a good job killing 16mm film in the 90's, even though back then my 16mm movie cameras shot pictures that made video look sick!

But look at that great shot of Mighty 611 that Yashica gave you!  Wow! 

By the way, if anyone's curious, this is what my 1899 Kodak looks like...

www.photographyhistory.com/cc2.html  Scroll down.

That camera "got" me into a local Civil War re-enactment about 20 years ago.  As I was walking up to the Union campsite I was challenged by a guard, "HALT! Who goes there?"

I pulled out the 1899, opened the bellows, and said "It's all right son, I'm with Mr. Brady!"

"Oh!  Pass, friend!"  That guard sure knew his Civil War history if he knew who Matthew Brady was!  He had a good sense of humor as well!

They must have had BIG pockets back in 1899, it sure won't fit in any pockets today!

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Posted by Miningman on Friday, March 30, 2018 9:49 PM

....and the rest of the story? You were a Conferderate Spy!

A guy from New Jersey who now lives in Virginia. 

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Posted by Firelock76 on Friday, March 30, 2018 9:52 PM

Miningman

....and the rest of the story? You were a Conferderate Spy!

A guy from New Jersey who now lives in Virginia. 

 

Me?  A "Galvanized Yankee?"  Not until they get some decent Italian bakeries down here bro!  They have caught up with the pizza, though.

PS:  "Galvanized Yankees" are what native Southerners called Northerners who took the Confederate side during the war, maybe "blue" on the inside but with a "grey" coating on the outside. 

Why? Well, some had their reasons, the most common being they'd married Southern girls and, well, who wants a battle line running through the bedroom?  Could be awkward, to say the least.

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Posted by Miningman on Friday, March 30, 2018 10:11 PM

If you could go back to say 1964 and have a pizza you would start crying realizing how far downhill its all come. I remember. 

I'm not sure you would recognize what they call pizza up here. People should be jailed for fraud!

Not sure if you opened the link I put on Classic Trains about 'not being very high tech in places' up here. Thats one of our gas stations! Looks pretty bad eh? But.....the fella that runs the place makes the absolute best ever rendition of an Egg McMuffin Sausage on the planet.  Doesn't even have a name for them...makes them in the am only until around noon. Only thing he makes...terrific stuff. 

Does one thing and does it superbly. 

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Posted by 54light15 on Saturday, March 31, 2018 12:24 AM

Well. Now that the subject is pizza, I have to say this about what is now the thing here in Toronto. Neapolitan pizza. Best in the world, they say. Authentic, they say. You'll love it, they say. (I love the Road movies) I have had pizza in Napoli back in the 1970s when I was in the Navy. Pizza? You bought it off a street vendor. It had a squashed tomato with skin, seeds and other tomato gack on it. A sprinkle of cheese and in the middle one olive and one anchovy. Take one bite, toss it in the garbage. Neapolitan is the best in the world these new places say. I say feh! 

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Posted by Miningman on Saturday, March 31, 2018 12:46 AM

Hmmmm...sounds like something the skinny jeans man bun crowd thinks is cool. 

Lots of places in Montreal put a regular hot dog wiener in the center, just laying on top..everyone of course fights over the damn wiener. 

Luv anchovies. Lots of 'em. Keep the pineapples, like what the heck? No. Pineapples are good mind you, have 'em in the morning cut up but not on a pizza, come on man. Have some respect. 

By the way, I saw the Tennessee Valley featured on PBS last night. The whole show was pretty good. 

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Posted by Firelock76 on Saturday, March 31, 2018 9:37 AM

Pineapples on a pizza is a subversive idea that oozed out of the Left Coast and made it's way across the country into the "chi-chi" pizza parlors inhabited by those who think they're part of the cool crowd.

You won't find that crap in any of the blue collar pizza places I used to frequent up in New Jersey, which is where you'll find the best pizza anyway!

Another subversive pizza is the "White Pizza."  Lady Firestorms brother lived on the Left Coast for a number of years, and when he came East for a visit we took him to a local Italian restaurant that had it on the menu.  The proprietor's from Brooklyn NY by the way, I suppose it's on his menu because of all the transplants down here, and business is business after all.

Anyway, "Brother" orders a white pizza, and THEN proceeds to eat it with a knife and fork!  Lady F just sat there and muttered "We don't know you!"

Pinapples on a pizza!  Mamma mia!

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Posted by 54light15 on Saturday, March 31, 2018 10:34 AM

On Long Island where I grew up, within a mile of the house were about a dozen good pizza joints. In 1973 a Pizza Hut opened. Everyone in town went. Once. They were out of business in a year. You want good pizza? Go where the Italian immigrants settled, places like New York- There's an astonishing amount of good ones in Buffalo and New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Pizza Hut and Domino's is pizza for people that live where there's no Italians. Pizza here in Toronto is pretty good if you find a real place that is not inhabited those with man buns. 

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Posted by Firelock76 on Saturday, March 31, 2018 11:02 AM

This might get me in trouble, but I always felt a good advertising line for Pizza Hut would be...

"Pizza Hut!  Better than no pizza at all..."

Although some would disagree vehemently, "No it ISN'T!"  Myself included.

Lady Firestorm's motto is "NO pizza at all is better than chain pizza!"

And where I grew up in North Jersey just about every town had a pizza place, or two or three or more.  All had their fans, but realistically all were pretty darn good, because if they weren't they just didn't last too long.

Remember zeppoles, the pastry made of left-over pizza dough and dusted with confectionary sugar?  Man, I'd kill to have some of those again, hot out of the deep fryer and ready to munch on, but it looks like no-one makes them anymore with the exception of the original (And only surviving) "Pizza Town" in Elmwood Park NJ.  Man, they were just the thing after you finished your pie and wanted some dessert!

Some of the best things about Jersey pizza places was the "street theater" that went on in them, such as...

"Hey Rocco!  Whatcha need tonight?"

"Three meatball heroes!"

"THREE?   What for?"

"One for me, one for my girlfriend, and one for my German Shepherd!"

"OK, that makes sense..."

Or the guys in the Pizza Town on Route 17 in Paramus, long gone now, getting into arguments and screaming at each other in Sicilian Italian.  Couldn't understand a word they said but you just KNEW it wasn't nice!

They made a helluva pie, though!

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Posted by 54light15 on Saturday, March 31, 2018 12:53 PM

And then in South Jersey, Runnymede to be exact is the best cheese steak place on the planet! Marino's on Black Horse Pike. I saw them put a sirloin as big as a boogie board on an automatic slicer that shaved it thinner than kleenex. Hotel Sierra that was awesome and the pizza was to die for. 

I was at the Hershey classic car show a few years ago. There was a trailer selling cheese steaks. I asked what kind of cheese they used and the guy said, Cheeze Whiz. I said, "don't you use provolone?" He said a proper cheese steak always has Cheeze Whiz. I told him, I was stationed in Philadelphia when my ship was in the yards in 1975 aned every cheese steak place used provolone. He thought about that and admtted that it souded pretty good. I told him to go to Marino's or the place on the west side of Broad street under the approach to the Walt Whitman bridge. Can't recall the name of that place but I do recall the owner was an ex-Marine and his cheese steaks were superb.

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Posted by Miningman on Saturday, March 31, 2018 1:32 PM

The Native Cree up here make that pizza dough deep fried and sprinkled with confectionary sugar. It is common in our few restaurants, along with just regular Bannock.  They call it deep fried Bannock. It is dee-lish. We are offering it fresh made during our upcoming 'Core Days' event catered by Kukums Kitchen ( Kukum is Cree for grandmother and that's exactly what they are, a group of hard working enterprising grandmothers who know what they are doing),  along with their outstanding not to be missed Whitefish fish fry, scalloped potatoes, cole slaw and side of corn. Worthy and just reward after having to suffer listening to me for 30 minutes in my presentation on non-Uranium exploration activity in Northern Saskatchewan. 

As if anyone is listening while the smells from the event tent are wafting all over the place. 

Get to Toronto...take flight Toronto-Saskatoon ( or the Canadian to Saskatoon) then flight Saskatoon to La Ronge. I'll pick you up at the airport in La Ronge. Bring your fishing gear. May 30 and 31. 

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Posted by Penny Trains on Saturday, March 31, 2018 6:50 PM

Firelock76
One of my pride and joy antiques is an 1899 Kodak pocket folder

I used to have a 1906 Brownie that still had a (used?) roll of film in it.  Gave it to a teenager who was really into photography so she could impress the heck out of her classmates.

Once or twice a year we go to Pizza hut for the breadsticks.  They look at us sideways when we order a personal pan pizza and 2 big orders of breadsticks!  Big Smile  The best pizza around here is Antonio's owned and operated by the Losciavo family.  They use provalone instead of mozerella which makes a HUGE difference.  The strangest pizza I ever saw but refused to eat I came accross in Chonburi Thailand at The Pizza Company.  I stuck with pepperoni myself but my friend decided to try the "Sausage Load".  She said it was basically a sausage pizza with thousand island dressing instead of tomato sauce.  Ick!

Big Smile  I'm Cuckoo For Choo Choo Stuffs!  Big Smile

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Posted by Firelock76 on Sunday, April 01, 2018 9:36 AM

What a coincidence, that 1899 Kodak of mine had a finished roll of film in it when I bought it!  I took it to a local camera shop I was doing a lot of business with and gave the guy the roll of film, just to see if there was anything he could do with it.

He couldn't at that date, mid-80's, but he tried.  He also told me, "Man, there's a LOT of silver in that film!" 

Pizza with thousand island dressing instead of tomato sauce?  My skin's crawling...

Provalone instead of mozzarella?  Interesting.  I wouldn't be afaid to try it.

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Posted by Paul of Covington on Sunday, April 01, 2018 9:45 PM

   Cameras.

   Pizzas.

   Matthew, thank you for those beautiful pictures.   You are an artist.

_____________

   "A stranger is just a friend you ain't met yet."  ___ Dave Gardner

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, April 02, 2018 1:54 AM

Should you wish to visit Israel, you need not go without Pizzas.  There are at least as many Pizza places as bagel places.  Indeed, when our "Tabak" is indisposed and meals at our Yeshiva just don't arrive, standard practice is to order a Pizza delivary, and the only quesition is which of several near-by, wiht different variety of cheeses used, to choose.

Not for Shabbat or Holidays, food then must be special, unique to the occasion, and even better than a great pizza.

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Posted by Firelock76 on Monday, April 02, 2018 3:17 PM

No suprise you can get a good pizza in Israel David, considering how many people from New York, New Jersey, or Long Island visit there, or take up permanent residence like yourself.  They're going to have high standards concerning pizza that better be met, or else!

They probably improved the local bagels as well!  Can't beat a bagel from the New York City area, no way!

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Tuesday, April 03, 2018 6:49 AM

For the best pizza anywhere, I would recommend either Giordano's or Lou Malnati's here in the Chicago area, deep dish of course.  No weird ingredients, just lots of cheese and a great sauce.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul

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