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1905 CPR colonist car undergoing complete restoration

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  • Member since
    October, 2008
  • From: Calgary
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1905 CPR colonist car undergoing complete restoration
Posted by cx500 on Saturday, June 24, 2017 3:32 PM

While I suspect the interior will be mostly replicated rather than original it will be worth seeing once complete.  The car had actually been believed to be a somewhat newer one for many years at the park, but its true identity was uncovered during the early stages.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/colonist-car-1202-restoration-1.4176511

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Posted by Deggesty on Saturday, June 24, 2017 7:56 PM

I do not have access to my CP timetables of the Fifties, but I believe that both sections of the Dominion still carried colonist cars. As I recall, the people traveling in these cars provided their own bedding. 

Johnny

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Posted by NKP guy on Monday, June 26, 2017 8:14 PM

   How wonderfully Canadian that these cars were officially termed "colonist cars."  Talk about a British euphemism!  In the United States these same immigrant cars were sometimes more honestly called "Zulu cars," which I assume was not meant to be complimentary.  

   The Wild West, indeed!

   Also, my heartfelt congratulations and best wishes to everyone living in the Dominion of the North as you fine folks start to celebrate Canada's sesquicentennial.  

   The maple leaf forever!

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Posted by Miningman on Monday, June 26, 2017 9:17 PM

NKP guy- Thank You! 150 years celebrations all over the country this July 1st. 

Also we are fortunate to have such a great neighbour. Every other country in the world is envious and admires our relationship. 

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Posted by 54light15 on Tuesday, June 27, 2017 7:50 AM

I'm in Ottawa right now and the warm-up to this weekend is all over the place. In front of the capital building just down the street are stages, tents and all kinds of stuff. Painted up shipping containers (that's a thing these days) featuring info and exhibits from all the provinces. Some of it leans a bit too much on the old "Mountie-maple-syrup-dog sled-lumberjack" stuff but what the hell. As long as there's beer, that's fine. 

Right near my hotel is the Lafayette House (The Laff) which is the oldest bar (1849) in town. A charmingly seedy place and perfect for an after work beverage! It's nice here. 

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Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, June 27, 2017 9:14 AM

54light15 and all- Heck, that's all we have up here in Northern Saskatchewan- "Mounties, dog sleds, lumberjacks",  but substitute "Miners" for maple syrup. Or blueberries on account of Boreal forest, no hardwoods, and Float planes, lots and lots of float planes. Also record number of Americans and rich NHL hockey players for fishing and getting primal with nature at pampered fishing lodges. 

Our July 1 Canada Day 150 Years calithumpian parade main feature is our colleges float which is a huge replica of a "Musketegum", the Western Spruce budworm beetle, complete with fangs and flashing red eyes. Those things will tear a strip of flesh off you like you were a rib eye steak. Hurts like the dickens. 

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Posted by wanswheel on Tuesday, June 27, 2017 4:49 PM
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Posted by Firelock76 on Tuesday, June 27, 2017 6:00 PM

Let me add my sincere congratulations to Miningman, 54light15, and all our friends north of the border.  Happy Birthday Canada!

And also, take a moment to remember the fallen of July 1st 1916, the first day of the Battle of the Somme.  Too many of your countrymen were lost that day.

This is for you folks up north, or anyone else who likes stirring music! 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wx_T1R026Wc

 

 

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Posted by NKP guy on Tuesday, June 27, 2017 8:47 PM

Firelock76:  Let me join you in that.

   On my first visit to Canada in 1966 I saw the National World War I Memorial in Ottawa.  The impact this superb monument made on me was and remains profoundly moving.  This Yank humbly bows to the memory of Canada's fallen service men and women.

   I'd love to be in Ottawa this weekend to drink it all in, as you are doing 54light15.  Have a double Canadian Club on the rocks on me at that historic bar!

   By the way, a Canada that didn't have sled dogs, maple syrup, Mounties, the CP & the CN, as well as Nelson Eddy*, the Chateau Frontenac, Sgt. Preston of the Yukon, poutine and Hockey Night would be a greatly diminished place, in my opinion.

*I know, I know...lol.

 

 

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Posted by 54light15 on Tuesday, June 27, 2017 8:59 PM

Everyone, thanks so much for posting what you have and the kind words. It is much appreciated. It's a great country; I moved here from New York in 1995 and it's home. You can have Celine Dion or Justin Bieber though. If you want real Canadian music, listen to this! He's sort of the Woody Guthrie of Canada and I was fortunate enough to see him abot ten years ago. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UxJvrD80nJ4 

In Stoney Creek, Ontario is the distillery that makes 40 Creek Special Reserve rye. Drink that and you won't ask for CC again! 

 

And, speaking of whisky, here's a very fine depiction of Canadian hardship way up North.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RgpHfQpYxl4 

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Posted by wanswheel on Wednesday, June 28, 2017 11:56 AM
My grandfather Joe was from Prince Edward Island. He drove the Montrealer in the steam era. Two of his brothers also were CV engineers. Their mother had 8 kids and died. Their father had 20 kids (and died).
The Charlottetown Guardian, Jan. 8, 1932

It is with sincere regret that the friends of Mr. John A. MacDonald learned of his death at his home at Grand River on Sunday, Nov. 29th. He had been in failing health for several months but it was only a few weeks before his death that it was realized he was beyond medical aid. During that time he was visited by almost every member of his numerous family, who came from great distances to pay their last tribute to a dearly beloved parent. Mr. MacDonald, who was seventy-six years of age, was widely known throughout Prince County and few men were held in greater esteem. His jovial disposition and ready wit made him a welcome member of any gathering and his singing and acting of comic songs was always a leading number in the entertainments staged in Grand River for many years past. He was a faithful member of the choir of St. Patrick's Church and in this and many other activities he will be greatly missed. During his illness he was frequently visited by his beloved pastor who administered to him the last consoling rites of Holy Mother Church.

 

Mr. MacDonald was twice married, his first wife Catherine McIntyre being the daughter of Alexander McIntyre, Bayside. His second wife who survives was formerly Janie McLellan of Cross Rivers. Of these two marriages twenty children were born to Mr. MacDonald, nineteen of whom are living. To all of them he gave a good Christian education and he had the consolation of seeing two of his daughters enter the religious life, Sadie, now Mother St. Leonce, Superior of the Sacred Heart Convent, Attleboro, Mass. and Veronica who is known in religion as Sister St. Jean Andrea, also in Attleboro, Mass. The other surviving children are Daniel, Joseph and Marshall, St. Albans, Vermont; John Leslie, San Diego, California; Alexander, Kellian and Albert, Buffalo, N. Y.; John Andrew, New York City; Mrs. John Baker and Stephen, Boston, Mass.; Mrs. Joseph MacLellan, Detroit, Mich.; Janie, Catherine, Wesley and Francis at home.

 

His funeral was held on Thursday at St. Patrick's Church where a Solemn Requiem Mass was sung by the Pastor, the Rev. John A. McDonald, assisted by the Rev. Father Monaghan of Miscouche as Deacon, and the Rev. Father Gillis, Wellington, as sub-deacon; while the Rev. Father Theodore Gallant of Mount Carmel presided at the organ. Following this beautiful service his remains were tenderly laid to rest beneath the sheltering arms of the cross.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=118975691

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Posted by Miningman on Thursday, June 29, 2017 12:26 AM

Great story Wanswheel. 

What a heritage. Prince Edward Island. Doesn't get more PEI than John A. MacDonald. 

Have you been over the Confederation Bridge? 

Pretty clever actually...it's free to go over to PEI but $20 bucks or so to get back to the mainland. 

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, June 29, 2017 7:07 AM

1.   During the realy dark ages of public transit in the USA, Toronto was the shining light that allowed those who felt public transit to be important to keep the faith.

2.   I am sure that Queen Elizabeth thought I was a French Canadian when we were face-to-face at the sound control room door at the dedication of the FAthers of the Confederation Theatre at Charlottetown, PEI.  (With the railroad still in operation there, even though recently made freight-only).

3.  Darn shame the causeway and bridge were not built for a railroad and not just a highway.

4.  Ditto morn the loss of Newfoundland's and PEI's.

5.  Glad to have been to St. Johns Newfoundland and Vancouver - by rail.

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Posted by wanswheel on Thursday, June 29, 2017 1:17 PM

Thanks Miningman!  Haven’t seen the bridge yet. ‘88 T-bird floated to Summerside and Pictou in ’96.

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Posted by wanswheel on Thursday, June 29, 2017 1:47 PM

daveklepper

I am sure that Queen Elizabeth thought I was a French Canadian when we were face-to-face at the sound control room door at the dedication of the FAthers of the Confederation Theatre at Charlottetown, PEI. 

The Queen needs high volume to hear her French.

This guy needs the volume down immediately.

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