May 2017 Issue Thomas the Bank Engine

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May 2017 Issue Thomas the Bank Engine
Posted by M636C on Monday, March 27, 2017 8:27 PM

I was slightly amused at the title of this article. Since Thomas is a British locomotive, the words "Bank Engine" have a specific meaning. In England, A "bank engine" is what would be called a "helper" in the USA.

Any steep gradient is known as a "bank", possibly a contraction from "embankment", the raised roadbed often associated with rail gradients.

Certainly, nobody in England reading the article would understand the use of "bank" in the title without reading into the article.

Peter

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Posted by erikem on Monday, March 27, 2017 9:10 PM

It does make for an interesting play on words as the inspiration for Thomas was indeed a "bank engine" in UK lingo.

 - Erik

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Posted by 54light15 on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 1:11 PM

Genrally the term in the U.K. is "banker."  In Germany banking engines were painted yellow. I have one on my N scale layout. An 0-8-8-0T Mallet in yellow. It's a signt to see in operation. 

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Posted by Penny Trains on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 6:39 PM

Uh huh...and he puffs little pound signs...

A waking Lithium Flower just about to bloom

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Posted by M636C on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 6:56 PM

54light15

Genrally the term in the U.K. is "banker."  In Germany banking engines were painted yellow. I have one on my N scale layout. An 0-8-8-0T Mallet in yellow. It's a sight to see in operation. 

 
In my experience "bank engine" and "banker" are used interchangeably.
 
Indeed in the original "Thomas" book (not the first of the series, but I had one) Thomas is tasked with pushing Gordon's train out of the station. This was done by the locomotive that hauled the coaches in in stations with steep grades, such as Euston and Liverpool Lime Street. The shunter failed to uncouple Thomas and he was hauled at high speed to the first stop og Gordon's express.
 
I don't think bank engines in Germany were painted yellow. I understood the the Bavarian Mallets were green in normal service but the K. Bay. St. B. had a habit of painting locomotives in special schemes for exhibitions. They used blue and brown as well as yellow, but service locomotives were green (and probably black during and after WW I).
 
Peter
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Posted by kgbw49 on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 3:33 AM

Why I remember this from when my kids were little, I don't know...

Edward banking up Gordon's Hill...

Related image

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 8:07 AM

Not necessarily what they ended up being used most for, but were not this class of engine dedsigned specifically for suburban passenger service?

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Posted by goldspike 1 on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 8:25 AM
Hey, guys; here in the US it's "Thomas the Tank Engine", not bank. I'm still a Thomas fan, but until just now I never heard him called a "bank" engine. Goldspike 1
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Posted by 54light15 on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 11:13 AM

A tank engine used as a bank engine. My Arnold 0-8-8-0T I was told was used strictly as a bank banker pusher shover what have you, that's what I recall from the catalog listing for the model. A type 96 and I've read that all were scrapped by 1950. Marklin makes it in HO scale. 

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Posted by Firelock76 on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 5:54 PM

For those who haven't seen the article yet, myself included, "Thomas the BANK Engine" is a term coined by the folks at the Strasburg Railroad.

Why?  Well, when they have their "Day Out With Thomas" events, as the old song goes, "My God how the money rolls in!"

I'm sure M636 is familiar with that old rugby locker room classic!

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Posted by M636C on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 6:31 PM

Firelock76

For those who haven't seen the article yet, myself included, "Thomas the BANK Engine" is a term coined by the folks at the Strasburg Railroad.

Why?  Well, when they have their "Day Out With Thomas" events, as the old song goes, "My God how the money rolls in!"

I'm sure M636 is familiar with that old rugby locker room classic!

 
Assuming this will pass the censor....
 
"We've shares in all the best companies...
 
In Tramways, Tobacco and Tin..
 
In brothels in Rio de Janeiro....
 
My God how the money rolls in."
 
There are web links to many variations of the full lyrics of this song, and the single verse I quoted doesn't appear in any of them, but I clearly remember it from my own university days. It is more acceptable than many versions I found. I suspect those lyrics date to the turn of the century before last.
 
Peter
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Posted by Firelock76 on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 6:50 PM

I've got a book here at the Fortress Firelock with a lot of football/rugby songs in it, including "My God How The Money Rolls In" and you're right brother, it'll never pass the censors!

Hoo, boy!

Not quite as rough as "The Lobster Song," but it's close!

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Posted by BaltACD on Thursday, March 30, 2017 12:53 PM

Firelock76

I've got a book here at the Fortress Firelock with a lot of football/rugby songs in it, including "My God How The Money Rolls In" and you're right brother, it'll never pass the censors!

Hoo, boy!

Not quite as rough as "The Lobster Song," but it's close!

 

         

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

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Posted by Firelock76 on Thursday, March 30, 2017 5:56 PM

So THAT'S what the melody to that song is!  I've been wondering for 40+ years!

Thanks Balt!

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Posted by kgbw49 on Saturday, April 01, 2017 1:18 PM

Also the melody to that classic Scottish song "My Bonnie Lies Over The Ocean".

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