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The double-ended Fairly on the Festieniog (Sp?) Any other like it?

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The double-ended Fairly on the Festieniog (Sp?) Any other like it?
Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, March 16, 2017 7:33 AM

This locomotive is actually two, back-to-back, sharing a common cab and controls.  (Or are there separate throttles and reverse gear?)  I think I rode behind it while visiting Wales in the summer of 1962.  I am sure it sitll exists and is still used.  Were any other locomotives like this built?

All three Welsh narrow-gauge railroads, Festieniog, Talilyn, and Vale of Rhydole are well-worth visiting and riding.  Also nearby is Mt Snowdon, highest in  the UK, with its cog railway.

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Thursday, March 16, 2017 10:02 AM

Weiner's "Articulated Locomotives" describes double Fairlies in some detail.  They may not have been that common but multiple examples did exist.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by Paul Milenkovic on Thursday, March 16, 2017 11:23 AM

https://books.google.com/books/about/Illustrated_Encyclopedia_of_the_World_s.html?id=vVJGAAAAYAAJ

Brian Hollingsworth's book includes the double Fairlie used on a steeply graded line in Mexico.

If GM "killed the electric car", what am I doing standing next to an EV-1, a half a block from the WSOR tracks?
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Posted by 54light15 on Thursday, March 16, 2017 12:34 PM

I've seen a double-ended Fairlie in Eastern Germany about 10 years ago. Built in 1902. It has enclosed drive gear and sat up high with roofed-over boilers. Google rollbockbahn and you'll see pictures of it. 

It is spelled "Festiniog" 

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Posted by erikem on Thursday, March 16, 2017 1:00 PM

The Denver & Rio Grande had one Fairlie early on.

George Hilton's book on American Narrow Gauge RR's stated that Fairlie was one of the major proponents of narrow gauge, and he argued that narrow gauge only made sense with his locomotive design. At the end of the day, Shay's, Climaxes and Heislers did pretty much what was claimed for the Fairlies and were a lot more practical.

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Posted by BaltACD on Thursday, March 16, 2017 3:24 PM

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

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Posted by M636C on Thursday, March 16, 2017 10:33 PM

There were a number of these in New Zealand

http://mp.natlib.govt.nz/image/?imageId=images-24630&profile=access

One, named "Josephine" is preserved.

http://farm9.static.flickr.com/8586/16498125116_6355e84e24.jpg

These look a bit more conventional than the Festiniog locomotives due to the larrger gauge.

New Zealand also used a number of single Fairlies generally similar to the Mason Bogie preserved by Henry Ford (with differences due to the various patents).

Peter

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Friday, March 17, 2017 6:57 AM

Looking at the patent diagram, it would seem that the original Fairlie design would be a short-range locomotive due to the limited onboard fuel and water supply.

The Mason Bogies were a variation of the Fairlie design with only one engine truck, I've seen them classified as 2-6-6T's.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by chrisjmiller on Monday, March 20, 2017 5:29 PM

The Ffestiniog Railway (double-F is pronounced like an English 'F' in Welsh, a single-F is pronounced like a 'V') has 3 Fairlies and is building a new one to replace an older example whose boiler certificate is expiring. http://www.dailypost.co.uk/whats-on/trips-breaks/ffestiniog-railway-build-seventh-double-11131346

It is now a joint operation with the Welsh Highland Railway, which runs articulated Beyer-Garratt 2-6-2+2-6-2 steam locos bought from South African Railways two-foot gauge operations. So you can stay in Llandudno on the North Wales coast, catch a standard gauge train on the (very scenic) route to Blaenau Ffestiniog; then take the Ffestiniog Railway to Porthmadog on the West coast; and then the Welsh Highland line to Caernarfon (reduced price if you have a Ffestiniog ticket). From there you can take the bus or another train back to Llandudno - which makes for a wonderful day out!

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Posted by jumper on Monday, March 20, 2017 9:38 PM

About 4 years ago I did just this trip. It and the country of Wales are beautiful. I haighly recommend doing a trip to Wales and riding all of their fine trains. Just a great experience. I've been to Wales 3 times and each time I ride different trains and see much of the countryside and its interesting history.

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Posted by Sir Madog on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 3:22 AM

54light15
I've seen a double-ended Fairlie in Eastern Germany about 10 years ago. Built in 1902. It has enclosed drive gear and sat up high with roofed-over boilers. Google rollbockbahn and you'll see pictures of it.

IIRC, the NG line from Reichenbach to Oberrheinsdord in Saxony had the only three Double Fairlie locos in Germany, out of which 1 survived the closure of the line in the early 1960´s and is now on display at the museum in Oberrheinsdorf, after first being displayed in Dresden and later on stored in Wernigerode/Harz for decades.

Interesting loco, which looked rather odd due to the big roof over both boilers and the encasing of both trucks.

(Source: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/fe/I_M.jpg)

The Ffestiniog Railway has 4 Double Fairlie locomotives and one Single Farlie engine and is, AFAIK, the only line still employing this type of loco. The railway also holds the patents, as Mr. Fairlie donated them to the line.

The line from Blaenau Ffestiniog to Porthmadog is the oldest narrow gauge line in the world, having been incorporated by an Act of Parliament in 1832. For 30 years, loaded slate trains would be run by gravity from the quarries in Blaenau Ffestiniog down to Port Madog (as it waqs spelled then) and the empties being hauled back up by horses. In 1863, the line was put "under steam" with diminutive 0-4-0 saddle tank engines, later equipped with a small tender for coal. In 1865, the first Double Fairlie called "Little Wonder" was introduced, which turned the line into a role model for 2 ft. gauge lines world wide. Slate business received its terminal blow after WW II, and traffic ceased in 1946. The original Act of Parliament did not include a clause for the closure or abandonment of the line, so it a new act would have to have been passed to close and dismantle the line. British MP´s had better things to do in those days and the line was saved and slowly being restored to what it is now, one of the most wonderful train rides in the world.

Ulrich     

People of my age don´t tan, they simply rust!


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Posted by lenzfamily on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 1:14 PM

Sir Madog

 

 
54light15
I've seen a double-ended Fairlie in Eastern Germany about 10 years ago. Built in 1902. It has enclosed drive gear and sat up high with roofed-over boilers. Google rollbockbahn and you'll see pictures of it.

 

IIRC, the NG line from Reichenbach to Oberrheinsdord in Saxony had the only three Double Fairlie locos in Germany, out of which 1 survived the closure of the line in the early 1960´s and is now on display at the museum in Oberrheinsdorf, after first being displayed in Dresden and later on stored in Wernigerode/Harz for decades.

Interesting loco, which looked rather odd due to the big roof over both boilers and the encasing of both trucks.

(Source: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/fe/I_M.jpg)

The Ffestiniog Railway has 4 Double Fairlie locomotives and one Single Farlie engine and is, AFAIK, the only line still employing this type of loco. The railway also holds the patents, as Mr. Fairlie donated them to the line.

The line from Blaenau Ffestiniog to Porthmadog is the oldest narrow gauge line in the world, having been incorporated by an Act of Parliament in 1832. For 30 years, loaded slate trains would be run by gravity from the quarries in Blaenau Ffestiniog down to Port Madog (as it waqs spelled then) and the empties being hauled back up by horses. In 1863, the line was put "under steam" with diminutive 0-4-0 saddle tank engines, later equipped with a small tender for coal. In 1865, the first Double Fairlie called "Little Wonder" was introduced, which turned the line into a role model for 2 ft. gauge lines world wide. Slate business received its terminal blow after WW II, and traffic ceased in 1946. The original Act of Parliament did not include a clause for the closure or abandonment of the line, so it a new act would have to have been passed to close and dismantle the line. British MP´s had better things to do in those days and the line was saved and slowly being restored to what it is now, one of the most wonderful train rides in the world.

 

Second the motion. The Ffestiniog/Welsh Highland Railway is a wonderful railway, beautifully restored equipment, track and ROW and much of it done in house and by volunteers. I recommend a trip/tour of the Boston Lodge Shops also. The manager was well informed and I had lots of opportunity to talk with shop crafts as well. Even had their own boilermaker. Porthmadog and area is picturesque, lots of walking trails especially along the beaches to the west. Made a day of it also at Carnaerfon on the north end of the WHR. Equally picturesque. Well worth the price of a ticket on both lines. Getting to Porthmadog on the Cambrian Line (Arriva) from Birmingham is also a treat. Beautiful ocean views and picturesque stops. This Arriva train was also a 'school bus' for elementary and some secondary students when we travelled in 2013.   

Charlie

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Posted by RME on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 2:19 PM

Welcome back, Charlie!

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Posted by Sir Madog on Thursday, March 23, 2017 11:48 AM

For those of you not familiar with this wonderful little narrow gauge railway, there are many videos available on Youtube!

Get your own impression here!

Ulrich     

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Posted by 54light15 on Thursday, March 23, 2017 3:12 PM

That's the exact locomotive I saw, painted green. In a one-stall engine shed, it wasn't in running condition; some side rods had been removed. Maybe it's running now? It would sure be awesome if someone made an N-scale model of it. Not to change the subject but an N-scale Garratt would be nice too. 

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Friday, March 24, 2017 6:47 AM

A Garratt in any scale would be nice.  As an aside, an Alco-built Garratt might have looked terrific on the Rio Grande narrow gauge lines.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by 54light15 on Friday, March 24, 2017 4:03 PM

I have seen Hornby (?) Garratts in OO scale. I think there's a guy in Australia who may be making one in N scale but I can't find any info. Reynauld's in Chicago has some amazing, unusual, brass, very expensive locomotives in various scales. 

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