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"The Mighty NYC Hudson" ... Vintage Film

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  • Member since
    January, 2017
  • 23 posts
"The Mighty NYC Hudson" ... Vintage Film
Posted by NYC John on Tuesday, February 14, 2017 10:53 PM

While definitely a promotional film, the historic value of information and visuals make this a worthy film to watch.  At least ... I like it! Wink  I hope you enjoy it too!

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  • From: Henrico, VA
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Posted by Firelock76 on Wednesday, February 15, 2017 4:55 PM

Thanks John, that's a fun film to watch.

On the flip side, this is one of the reasons NYC fans are so annoyed that none of those Hudsons were saved from the scrapper.  How can you show such pride in your equipment and then scrap it without a second thought ten years later?

Saving just one, or maybe two, wouldn't have hurt the bottom line all that much, not with the scrap value being pennies on the pound.

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Posted by NYC John on Wednesday, February 15, 2017 5:06 PM

Amen to that!  Luckily, when I was 4 or 5 years old, my Pop took me to an old rail head somewhere in the New York City area - maybe even the Harmon Yard, I don't know.  At any rate, he took me over to this GIANT Locomotive - remember I was a little squirt back then Wink, and there is sat on the tracks ... "Johnny, doesn't it sound like it's breathing?", my old man said to me.  What we were looking at, was one of the last Hudsons.  What I didn't realize then, as I do now, that its "breathing" ... was being emptied before being scrapped.  In fact, in the backgorund I thought I was seeing "fireworks" ... in reality it was the flying sparks of the cutting torches!  What I remember most that day, was the SIZE of the machine ... and the sad look on my Pops face ... He knew what was happening.  I was just a dumb little kid, wowing at the GIANT Locomotive.  Nowadays, that memory saddens me as well.

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  • From: Henrico, VA
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Posted by Firelock76 on Wednesday, February 15, 2017 7:02 PM

You know, one of my earliest memories is of a NYC steam engine, although it took some research a few years ago to find out where and when.

I couldn't have been more than three years old at the time, and in my readings I found out the Central ran steam on the West Shore Line as late as 1956, so that jibes with the proper time and place.  What kind of steamer?  I couldn't tell you, Mohawk, Hudson, who knows?  But it sure impressed the hell out of me just like your encounter with that Hudson at Harmon impressed you.  I can close my eyes and still see it.

I try to take the high road as far as the NYC officials are concerned.  After all, they were businessmen and not historians.  But still, to go from "We're the greatest railroad in the world and the Hudson is the greatest locomotive!"  to "Let's get rid of these things as fast as we can!"   It just boggles the mind.

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  • 23 posts
Posted by NYC John on Wednesday, February 15, 2017 11:12 PM

Agreed!  It is heartbreaking to know - now that we are 'of age' - that after lauding the Hudson as THE Locomotive, nobody gave one thought to preserving one for posterity!  Probably 'business' concerns overrode any sentimentality or affection for these machines.  The photos I posted of the AT&SF Hudson in "How Does Water Get From The Tender To The Locomotive?", show that at least someone, somewhere, thought enough of this Locomotive to save it from the cutter's torch!  In fact, I have an old photo of this very Locomotive - #3450 - when it was new!  The actual Baldwin Builder's Photo, from 1927, in Santa Fe!AT&SF Hudson #3450 - Baldwin Builder's Photo, from 1927, in Santa Fe Way

Granted, it differes some from those of the NYC, and it was made by a different builder - NYC Hudsons were ALCO built - BUT ... IT IS STILL AROUND! Big Smile And to a modeler, that is a Hallelujah!  To a Rail Fan, and lover of Steam Locomotives, it is a Hallelujah Hosanna!  LOL!!!

I feel the same for Steam Locomotive #3007, Chicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q), residing at the Illinois Railway Museum in Union Illinois.

Steam Locomotive #3001, Chicago, Burlington & Quincy (CB&Q), at the Illinois Railway Museum.

And for Hudson Steam Locomotive CB&Q #3001 at the Wapello County Historical Museum, in Ottumwa, Iowa.  Seen here March 24, 2009, and photographed by Michael V. Greespun.

 

The oft-overlooked, Hudson Steam Locomotive, Nickle Plate Road #170, seen here in Ohio - circa the late 1940's.

I say, "oft-overlooked" due to the acquisition of the "Elephant Ears" deflectors.  Why and when were they added?  Who knows?  At least it's another Hudson, saved from the cutters torch!  

Here, the Nickle Plate Road #170 is seen at the National Museum of Transportation, St. Louis, Missouri, in 1990.  More recently ... July 11, 2013.

And let's not forget the "Royal Hudsons" of the Canadian Pacific Railway!  They saved a few of their Hudsons ... smart!

But as far as our beloved NYC Hudsons ... none exist ... the sin of big business!  All we have are historic photos, and paintings such as this one ... NYC Hudsons ... 'Thoroughbreds', painted by Walter L. Greene.

Sometimes I think I was born too late ... Wink

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Posted by ROBERT WILLISON on Thursday, February 16, 2017 3:57 PM

Firelock76

You know, one of my earliest memories is of a NYC steam engine, although it took some research a few years ago to find out where and when.

I couldn't have been more than three years old at the time, and in my readings I found out the Central ran steam on the West Shore Line as late as 1956, so that jibes with the proper time and place.  What kind of steamer?  I couldn't tell you, Mohawk, Hudson, who knows?  But it sure impressed the hell out of me just like your encounter with that Hudson at Harmon impressed you.  I can close my eyes and still see it.

I try to take the high road as far as the NYC officials are concerned.  After all, they were businessmen and not historians.  But still, to go from "We're the greatest railroad in the world and the Hudson is the greatest locomotive!"  to "Let's get rid of these things as fast as we can!"   It just boggles the mind.

 

firelock my most vivid memory of steam when I was just a little lad was crawling on the long string of nkp dead steamers at conneaut Ohio.  We sit on the engineer seat,  peer out the window and dreamed we running on the main lines. Long string of dead  Berkshire's and  Mikado waiting their turn to be scrapped.

Then low and behold a nkp steamer came to Cleveland. The 759 rolled South West out of the still busy looking Union terminal fighting upgrade out of the cuyohaga river valley. She blew her whistle and amazingly two Lakers on the river returned the salute.

Today union terminal, now tower city is home to the RTA rapids and retail stores. The lake steam boats are all but gone. The 759, saved but probably never to run again.  Some call this progress, I'm  not quite sure.

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