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New York in 1937

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New York in 1937
Posted by 54light15 on Wednesday, September 15, 2021 9:55 AM

This is mainly about ship traffic but there is a little railroad action in the form of barges and the Hell Gate bridge. It's worth seeing. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T65ZBMLlgp0 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Wednesday, September 15, 2021 11:44 AM

Wow!  What a great time machine!  Thanks for posting!

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Posted by 54light15 on Wednesday, September 15, 2021 3:46 PM

What I find most interesting are the sailing ships looking like they are still working vessels. In 1937, yet. 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Wednesday, September 15, 2021 4:08 PM

54light15

What I find most interesting are the sailing ships looking like they are still working vessels. In 1937, yet. 

 

Coasting schooners hung on for quite a while.  While subject to the vagaries of winds (although schooners can sail a lot closer to the wind than a square-rigger can) they were still a very economical way to haul cargo of various types up and down the East Coast. 

Square-riggers were also an economical way to haul non time sensitive cargos to areas where the prevailing trade winds could take them, especially to harbors that didn't have the infrastructure to support steamships, but their time was rapidly coming to an end. 

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Posted by Backshop on Wednesday, September 15, 2021 7:51 PM

Does anyone know which ocean liner that was at the very beginning?

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Posted by 54light15 on Wednesday, September 15, 2021 9:10 PM

The SS Queen of Bermuda. 

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Posted by Backshop on Thursday, September 16, 2021 9:39 AM

54light15

The SS Queen of Bermuda. 

 

Thanks!

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Posted by pennytrains on Thursday, September 16, 2021 7:07 PM

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

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Posted by M636C on Friday, September 17, 2021 9:38 AM

The colouring of the newsreel was a bit more "artificial" rather than "Intelligent".

I recognised the "Queen of Bermuda", although, since they cut the sequence before the name, it could have been "Monarch of Bermuda". I'm surprised the funnel coulours were so wrong. At least the original film must have been panchromatic to render the red such a light colour.

This has been listed on these forums before:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SJDLl2RbS_c

But this has genuine colour footage of New York in 1939 if I've followed it correctly. It has closed captions (in French like the commentary) but you should recoginse the names of the areas.

The unloading of passenger's cars and the elevated railway scenes were high points, but the actual colours of clothing was interesting. Many more brown suits and jackets than more recently.

The New York scenes are from 30 minutes to 40 minutes in the video. There is some B&W newsreel footage.

Peter

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Posted by mudchicken on Friday, September 17, 2021 2:17 PM

54light15

The SS Queen of Bermuda.  

Scrapped in 1966. Seems to have had a thing about funnels.Huh?

Mudchicken Nothing is worth taking the risk of losing a life over. Come home tonight in the same condition that you left home this morning in. Safety begins with ME.... cinscocom-west
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Posted by M636C on Saturday, September 18, 2021 7:01 AM

Here are two similar colourised videos of London.

The first, during WWII

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QLbPYQcUcgM

This includes some pre WWII coverage of Waterloo station.

Apparently made in 1933

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MRAOrIfcvkU

In both of these, the colour red seems to be a problem.

London buses and trams were red with cream lining.

Even the changing of the guard produces only a weak red...

Peter

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Posted by Overmod on Saturday, September 18, 2021 7:32 AM

mudchicken
Seems to have had a thing about funnels.

You can see firsthand the aircraft revolution in a particularly dramatic form in the last part of this.  

The ship was extensively rebuilt to receive its 'last' single funnel, being lengthened at the same time.  Presumably it was extensively redecorated inside.  Yet less than half a decade later, the company had abandoned liner service to Bermuda entirely, and the ship was not resold to another market but scrapped outright.

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Posted by 54light15 on Saturday, September 18, 2021 9:53 AM

That second London film was amazing to see. Note the half-track in front of the airliner at 1:30- it's a Citroen Kegresse. 

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Posted by Erik_Mag on Saturday, September 18, 2021 11:07 AM

The airliner, a Handley Page H.P. 4 or H.P. 45, which also was amazing to see as it was one of the last biplane airliners.

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Posted by Overmod on Saturday, September 18, 2021 2:38 PM

In 1933 I believe the United States still primarily used biplane airliners.

Note the locomotive chassis being shipped at about 4:15.  It would be interesting to identify what that is, and where it might be going.

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Posted by pennytrains on Saturday, September 18, 2021 5:54 PM

Speaking of how colors showed up on black and white film, take a look at this: https://www.icollector.com/Douglas-Croft-Robin-hero-tunic-from-Batman-the-serial_i35060805

And here it is from 1943 (scroll down, upper photo) and the later 1949 (actual red, yellow and green) production stills: https://dcmovies.fandom.com/wiki/Robin_Suit_(Batman_serials)

 

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

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Posted by M636C on Saturday, September 18, 2021 7:17 PM

Overmod

In 1933 I believe the United States still primarily used biplane airliners.

Note the locomotive chassis being shipped at about 4:15.  It would be interesting to identify what that is, and where it might be going.

 

After a couple of views and some thought, that is the "Royal Scot" (actually 6152) being shipped for exhibition in the United States...

There is a build up of dirt at the buffer mountings indicating that it isn't a brand new locomotive. The colours and lining are correct, and just before the loco what appears to be an LMS passenger car is seen being loaded.

So it was going to the USA.

Peter

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Posted by Paul Milenkovic on Saturday, September 18, 2021 9:23 PM

Overmod

In 1933 I believe the United States still primarily used biplane airliners.

Note the locomotive chassis being shipped at about 4:15.  It would be interesting to identify what that is, and where it might be going.

 

Biplane?  I guess the DC-3 monoplane wasn't introduced until 1935?

Wikipedia claims the DC-3 was "fast", allowing a coast-to-coast trip in the US taking only 18 hours with only 3 stops.

There is a story about two elderly ladies who bought tickets on such a trip instead of taking a train trip.  Every time they landed for one of these stops, a little blue truck would race up to refuel their plane so they could be on their way.

One lady turns to the other, "isn't it amazing how fast this airplane is?"  The other replies, "That is indeed the case.  But what is even more amazing is how the little blue truck is able to keep up with us!"

If GM "killed the electric car", what am I doing standing next to an EV-1, a half a block from the WSOR tracks?
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Posted by M636C on Sunday, September 19, 2021 6:15 AM

Here is yet another colourised video from the 1930s.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Dbvj6-SdX0

This covers a ferry crossing from Flushing (in Holland) to Harwich and scenes of London (some of which were in the "1933" video.)

The Dutch trains have NS class 3900 4-6-0s and the "Flushing Continental" has a rebuilt LNER B12/3 4-6-0.

Check out the miniature reversing train toy at 6:31...

They tried to make the buses and trams in London red, but didn't try with the Mitropa dining car on the Dutch train.

Peter

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Posted by Erik_Mag on Sunday, September 19, 2021 11:44 PM

Overmod

In 1933 I believe the United States still primarily used biplane airliners.

The Curtis Condor was probably the only biplane "airliner" that was in wide use in the US in 1933. IIRC, the Ford Tri-motor was the most common prior to the introduction of the Boeing 247 and Douglas DC-2. Biplanes such as the Boeing 40 did have space for paying passengers, but this was more like an "air taxi" rather than an airliner. (Though a DC-3 would seem ridiculously small to the current generation of airline pax.)

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Posted by MidlandMike on Monday, September 20, 2021 8:40 PM

54light15

The SS Queen of Bermuda. 

 

I may have visited that ship.  In the late 50s or early 60s, when I was a kid living in the New York area, we went to see off some friends of my parents on a cruse to Bermuda.  I remember how small their cabin was, and the port hole.  The ship had 3 funnels.  The name sounds familiar.

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Posted by M636C on Thursday, September 23, 2021 12:23 AM

MidlandMike

 

54light15

The SS Queen of Bermuda. 

 

I may have visited that ship.  In the late 50s or early 60s, when I was a kid living in the New York area, we went to see off some friends of my parents on a cruse to Bermuda.  I remember how small their cabin was, and the port hole.  The ship had 3 funnels.  The name sounds familiar.

 

The Queen of Bermuda was rebuilt with new boilers during the winter of 1961-62 and returned to service with a single funnel. So your recollection should be before the end of 1961.

There is an excellent book, Queen of Bermuda and the Furness Bermuda line, by Plowman and Card which lists many of the ships on the New York Bermuda service. I saw this book and bought it, even though I knew little about the ship or its owners.

Peter

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Posted by kgbw49 on Sunday, September 26, 2021 4:19 AM

C-47 (DC-3) and C-46 planes are still in use by Buffalo Airways as cargo planes, as well as Lockheed Electras. They are based out of Yellowknife, Northwest Territories.

https://buffaloairways.com/

https://buffaloairways.com/gallery/

https://airwear.bigcartel.com/

Everyday preservation still earning its keep.

This would be akin to a railroad running steam in the 21st Century, such as a company acquiring all 9 surviving Santa Fe 4-8-4s and all 5 surviving Sante Fe 2-10-4s and running an intermodal bridge line with them.

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Sunday, September 26, 2021 10:05 AM

Not quite.  Judging by the geography and the equipment, a better analogy might be a branch or secondary main operated by light 2-8-2's.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by 54light15 on Sunday, September 26, 2021 10:51 AM

Isn't there an airline in Michigan that uses Ford Trimotors? 

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Posted by MidlandMike on Sunday, September 26, 2021 10:22 PM

There was an Ohio airservice that flew Ford trimotors to some islands in Lake Erie, but apparently the plane is at a museum, still airworthy.

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Posted by BEAUSABRE on Monday, September 27, 2021 5:24 AM

Back in the Eighties, Boston hosted a triple header convention, the NMRA, R&LHS and NRHS. On of the excursions I took advantage of was steam to Woods Hole, a ferry to Nantucket and a ride in a DC3 back to Logan, with a bus ride back to the Prudential Center. First and only time I've ever ridden that sort of aircraft. It was sort of an homage to my uncle who had jumped many times from C-47's as a member of the 511th Parachute Infantry of the 11th Airborne Division in World War II.  

My dad used to take a major airline on business trips to Chicago and then take a North Central Airline DC3 to his destination in the back woods in the Sixties. On one trip, he wanted something to read so he went up to the magazine rack on the cockpit wall. There was a plaque there, proclaiming the ship to be the world's highest airtime (hours) airliner in the world, having been built in 1936 or 37. Dad spent the rest of the trip staring out at the wings hoping those Douglas workers in Santa Monica, the year he graduated high school, knew what they were doing.

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Posted by 54light15 on Monday, September 27, 2021 11:41 AM

I think the Douglas people were quite competent in building the C-47, the R4D, the DC-3 as well as the Dakota. I've never flown in one, but I have sat in one. I did fly in a Lockheed Electra that was owned by Air Canada. It was a fantastic experience but the interior was upgraded to look like a King Air or other modern aircraft. Another time I sat inside a Lear Jet- the interior looked like a badly worn 1975 Cadillac. 

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Posted by BEAUSABRE on Monday, September 27, 2021 5:33 PM

54light15
What I find most interesting are the sailing ships looking like they are still working vessels. In 1937, yet. 

Germany's Flying P Line was famous for using large sea going sailing ships (some were five masted square riggers) for hauling bulk (ie: non-time sensitive) cargos well into the 1930's. All the ships had names beginning with the letter P

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flying_P-Liner

(217) The Flying P-Liners - YouTube

The company still exists today, but its sailing ships are, alas, gone from the high seas. 

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Posted by BEAUSABRE on Monday, September 27, 2021 5:43 PM

54light15 - Yes, but Dad, an engineer by trade, was thinking about how many hard takeoffs and landings and how much turbulence over forty or so years and metal fatique

Fatigue (material) - Wikipedia

I've never flown in an Electra (although I rode and even jumped from its cousin, the C-130) but Dad used to fly in them on the New York-Boston Shuttle where Eastern had banished them after regional jets became available and liked them (turbojets were smother than reciprocating engines). Of course, they did have that minor problem of the wings falling off, but that was cured VERY quickly. 

"Three aircraft were lost in fatal accidents between February 1959 and March 1960. After the third crash, the FAA limited the Electra's speed until the cause could be determined.

After an extensive investigation, two of the crashes (in September 1959 and March 1960) were found to be caused by an engine mount problem. The mounting of the gearbox cracked, the reduced rigidity enabled a phenomenon called "whirl mode flutter" (analogous to the precession of a child's top as it slows down, an interaction of propellers with airflow) that affected the outboard engine nacelles. When the oscillation was transmitted to the wings and the flutter frequency decreased to a point where it was resonant with the outer wing panels (at the same frequency, or harmonically related ones), violent up-and-down oscillation increased until the wings would tear off"

Oh, the competition - TWA - was flying Lockheed Constellations to use up their useful life on the shuttle run. Dad got to fly on them also. 

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