Early Locomotive Pilot Trucks, Help? (Lincoln Funeral Locomotive Model)

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  • Member since
    May 2018
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Early Locomotive Pilot Trucks, Help? (Lincoln Funeral Locomotive Model)
Posted by DevinCamary on Wednesday, December 11, 2019 3:49 AM

Hi there, I havent been part of this forum for quite some time. Last thing I talked about was the cut off valves of the Nashville 4-4-0 that pulled the Lincoln Funeral train. And well... I got most of the locomotive modeled. 

https://imgur.com/xLrf4x5

So far, its great... but, the pilot truck is confusing. I am not able to get that good of a view of whats under it, so I went ahead and based the pilot truck off of this kind...what ever its called.

https://imgur.com/UPJ0Jc0https://imgur.com/UPJ0Jc0https://imgur.com/UPJ0Jc0https://imgur.com/UPJ0Jc0

And the wheel shield thing that goes over the pilot wheels, do they rotate/slide with the pilot wheels or no? I am worried if they do rotate they'd collide with the drain cogs. 

 

If anyone could help, maybe a photo of what kind of pilot truck would be correct, that would be greatly appreciated! (Also if someone wants a photo of how I did the cog thing with the reverser and the steam cut off, I'd gladly show you guys) 

  • Member since
    September 2010
  • From: Parma Heights Ohio
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Posted by Penny Trains on Thursday, December 12, 2019 7:38 PM

This is how Ernest "Mooney" Warther carved it:

His model of the full train:

He worked between 1905 and 1971.

Big Smile  I'm Cuckoo For Choo Choo Stuffs!  Big Smile

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Posted by Overmod on Thursday, December 12, 2019 10:50 PM

Cogs.  That's a good way to get around our pathetic nanny software, isn't it?  Just don't go confusing it with gears of any kind, riding-cutoff or otherwise...

This is much more properly a job for RyPN, where Euclid's alter ego will happily discuss pilot trucks with you at length and, probably, useful detail and there are people who know early pilot-truck design well, and they know people who have built full-size replicas using the best of the Civil War era's technology.

The period from circa 1850 to the close of the Civil War was a time of great and rapid change in pilot-truck configuration and suspension/guiding design.  It would of course essentially conclude (for American 4-4-0s) in the 'melodies cast and wrought in metal' truck design with the wheels framing the cylinder block, instead of having the block look as if it is perched awkwardly over the wheels.  Study all the early prototypes you can find.

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Posted by DevinCamary on Tuesday, December 17, 2019 5:07 PM

Oh, alrighty. So uh, is he on this forum or somewhere else? I also got a new book on locomotives and it seems like the pilot truck was fixed and not really able to slide/pivot to allow the engine to go around curves as well... and noticed most engines didnt have a flang on the front drive wheel. BUT, it looks like the Nashville had a flang on it's front trive wheels. Wouldnt a pilot, that doesnt move side to side wound bends, be detremental to a 4-4-0 that has flangs on the front drivers?

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    May 2018
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Posted by DevinCamary on Tuesday, December 17, 2019 5:11 PM

That engine... doesnt look as accurate, still looks cool though.

  • Member since
    May 2018
  • 9 posts
Posted by DevinCamary on Saturday, January 11, 2020 7:42 PM

Also, i meant drain cocks. that let the water out of the pistons to keep them from bursting.

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