Top 5 8-Coupled Articulateds

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Top 5 8-Coupled Articulateds
Posted by kgbw49 on Wednesday, August 08, 2018 9:26 PM

Taking the cue from Dave Klepper in the Top 5 4-8-4 Discussion Topic, what are your Top 5 8-coupled articulated locomotives?

Compound or simple, any combination of lead truck, trailing truck or no trailing truck.

Here is a list to get things started:

Norfolk & Western Y6b 2-8-8-2 - compound articulated black diamond hauler mountain mauler extraordinaire with a shot of simple steam on the side

Great Northern R-2 2-8-8-2 - simple articulated fast freight speed with maximum tractive effort for the Rockies

Great Northern N-3 2-8-8-0 - simple articulated Swiss Army knife - iron ore hauler, grain hauler, merchandise hauler, troop train hauler

D&RGW R1 L-132 2-8-8-2 - High altitude heavy hauler

DM&IR M-3 2-8-8-4 - Iron ore hauler of 15,000 tons decades before UP-BNSF coal trains of that size 

 

 

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Posted by M636C on Thursday, August 09, 2018 12:41 AM

Surely Beyer Garratts count....

The NSWGR AD60 comes to mind.

The South African GMAM must be up there along with the East African 59th class.

Peter

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Posted by BaltACD on Thursday, August 09, 2018 8:27 AM

B&O's EM-1's  shown tripleheading a coal train up Chardon Hill inroute to Painesville.

         

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Posted by sgriggs on Thursday, August 09, 2018 9:21 AM

I'll throw this out:

 

Union Pacific 4000 class 4-8-8-4

 

Norfolk & Western Y6b 2-8-8-2

 

Duluth Missabe & Iron Range M-3 2-8-8-4

 

Baltimore & Ohio EM-1 2-8-8-4

 

Southern Pacific AC-12 4-8-8-2

 

Scott Griggs

Louisville, KY

 

 

 

 

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Posted by selector on Thursday, August 09, 2018 11:26 AM

But....WHY??????   WHY?????  They looked purdier than the other contenders?  They rode better between the speeds of 30 and 50 mph?  Their whistles were cooler?

Please flesh this out with a little carne.

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Posted by sgriggs on Thursday, August 09, 2018 7:17 PM

sgriggs

I'll throw this out:

 

Union Pacific 4000 class 4-8-8-4

 

Norfolk & Western Y6b 2-8-8-2

 

Duluth Missabe & Iron Range M-3 2-8-8-4

 

Baltimore & Ohio EM-1 2-8-8-4

 

Southern Pacific AC-12 4-8-8-2

 

Scott Griggs

Louisville, KY 

 

Here is some rationale for my list:

 

UP 4000 - Largest, heaviest (yes I know what Huddleston wrote and I think he was reaching), arguably most capable high speed super power articulated.

N&W Y6b - Masterpiece of evolutionary design.  Easily the highest thermodynamic efficiency of any modern articulated.  Best design for hauling dead freight up steep grades.

DM&IR M3 - Excellent modern and versatile heavy duty freight locomotives.  D&RGW leased some M4’s for use over the Tennessee Pass in the 1940's and raved about them.

B&O EM-1 - Another excellent late steam design that did everything the B&O wanted.  Although on the small side, the EM-1’s were easily among the finest articulateds operating in the Eastern U.S.

SP AC-12 - Very versatile big power used all over the SP, including through the tunnels and snow sheds of the Sierra Nevada.  The AC-12’s were the newest cab forwards in the SP’s large fleet.

 

Scott

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Posted by steamhogger on Thursday, August 09, 2018 7:55 PM
I agree that the B&O EM-1 was one of the finest ever. I got to ride one on the why in Painesville Ohio in middle fifties,
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Posted by kgbw49 on Friday, August 10, 2018 3:35 AM

The SP AC units were also consistently used on passenger runs as primary power for passenger schedules at several locations around the SP system, if I recall correctly.

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Posted by sgriggs on Friday, August 10, 2018 5:25 AM

kgbw49

The SP AC units were also consistently used on passenger runs as primary power for passenger schedules at several locations around the SP system, if I recall correctly.

 

 

I’ve seen photos of cab forwards hauling long strings of heavyweights over rugged parts of the SP.

 

Scott

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Friday, August 10, 2018 6:54 AM

I would agree with Peter and put up a Garratt for consideration, specifically NSWGR AD60 class 4-8-4+4-8-4's.  I believe that these were the largest Garratts ever built and provided big power for relatively light rail.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by Penny Trains on Friday, August 10, 2018 6:52 PM

N&W Y6b because they were perfectly designed for the task they were most often assigned to: mineral service on heavy grades.

N&W Z1b simply because I like the look of them and maybe also because they were workhorses that didn't get much glory.  And where else besides on the N&W could you find big articulateds in yard and hump service.

UP Big Boy because as with N&W's Y classes they were designed to do a specific job and they did it admirably.

C&O H-8 2-6-6-6 because I like 'em.

PRR T1 because who besides the Pennsy would try to streamline an articulated?  Laugh

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Posted by Overmod on Friday, August 10, 2018 7:32 PM

Penny Trains
PRR T1 because who besides the Pennsy would try to streamline an articulated?

Hey, THAT'S NOT FAIR.  And you know better about the 'real thing' being articulated, even though some of the models kinda are...

And not even true: a perfectly good counter-example already having been mentioned here: the AC-12s were streamlined by most definitions that could be applied to nominally much "faster" steam power...

(What you need for full comic effect here is to put up a picture of a lash-up of TWO T1s here, which is an 'eight-coupled articulated' just as a brace of K4s is equivalent to a very fast 4-6-6-4...)

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Posted by selector on Friday, August 10, 2018 10:52 PM

 Geeeeezzz... Huh?  Even Broadway Limited Imports knew better'n to articulate their HO scale T1.

 

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Posted by kgbw49 on Saturday, August 11, 2018 7:59 AM

This is a great video - double-headed AD60s - just 1 minute 35 seconds

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=O22dS7JbAHQ

And another heading up Fassifern Bank - about 4 minutes

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=-1EWpCQP7eE

 

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Posted by Miningman on Saturday, August 11, 2018 10:21 AM

Powerful imagery. 

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Posted by Firelock76 on Saturday, August 11, 2018 9:24 PM

Powerful imagery all right.  Makes me feel like I'm on the Bismarck and King George V and Rodney are coming to get me!  British steel at it's most awesome!

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Posted by M636C on Monday, August 20, 2018 6:10 AM

kgbw49

This is a great video - double-headed AD60s - just 1 minute 35 seconds

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=O22dS7JbAHQ

And another heading up Fassifern Bank - about 4 minutes

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=-1EWpCQP7eE

 

 

I guess it wouldn't surprise anyone to know that I had been to Fassifern in that era, and photographed the double headed Garratts there, only still photos of course and mainly B&W. I remember one occasion in 1970 when I did have colour film, because Pacific 3822 was expected to haul the "Newcastle Flyer" after some time out of service for repairs, that nobody really expected to be completed. But to our relief, it appeared heading south as a "light engine" and returned on the "Flyer" as advised. we spent about half a day on a rocky outcrop north of the road bridge seen in some of the videos.

However, I also met the man who took the movies, Philip Belbin in August 1962 photographing trains on a rural branch on the southern edge of Sydney from Campbeltown to Camden. Phil gave me a lift to follow the train, but I had used the last frame of 35mm on the first shot of the branchline train. His eldest son is a magazine editor which I regularly contribute to, and is a close friend. But all wasn't lost. The photo I took with that last frame is the best I ever took of that line, and I have a 10" x 12" enlargement handy. I should scan that some day...

Peter

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