North American Operations of the GATX Tank Trains

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Posted by Hearne Guy on Saturday, January 24, 2015 10:55 PM

Each car has a butterfly valve that is shut in transit.  They are located at each end of the interconnecting 10" hoses.  On some of the earlier cars the hoses were only 6" in diameter but they still had the butterfly valves to reduce the spillage should the cars derail and the hoses ripped off.

Robert

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Posted by Paul_D_North_Jr on Sunday, January 25, 2015 10:23 AM

Back in 2010 and 2011 I saw several not-very-long strings of the TankTrain in CP's ex-D&H Kenwood Yard, just south of Albany, NY. 

There are several photos (none are mine) on the Railpictures.net website of the TankTrain in recent operations - see, for example:

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=509198&nseq=0 (Quebec, Sept. 10, 2014)

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=504799&nseq=1 (Quebec, Nov. 02, 2014)

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=53219&nseq=21 (Oct. 2003 - note that the caption says "The trains consit of 4 block of 17 cars, for a total of 68 cars. Six trains runs daily."  The comment - "it can be seen 6 times a day- too dark ;-)" - also seems to confirm the 6 trains daily - ?!?).

And one of my favorites from Feb. 2006:

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=133704&nseq=16 

- Paul North. 

 

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Posted by Andrew Falconer on Monday, January 26, 2015 12:43 AM

The September 10th, 2014 photo on the CN in Quebec shows the GATX TankTrain and a new tank train of oil product from North Dakota moved first by the BNSF.

There is a BNSF buffer service only covered hopper.

 

The next photo shows the new ARI or Greenbrier built oil tank cars.

 

When the link is clicked upon, they load up that webpage in this window tab, instead of in another window or even a second tab.

Andrew

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Posted by Andrew Falconer on Monday, January 26, 2015 12:46 AM

The CN GATX TankTrain tank car trains, shown in the 2003 and 2006 photos on the railpictures site, have no buffer cars between the tanks and the locomotives.

Andrew

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Posted by BaltACD on Monday, January 26, 2015 6:18 AM

Andrew Falconer

The CN GATX TankTrain tank car trains, shown in the 2003 and 2006 photos on the railpictures site, have no buffer cars between the tanks and the locomotives.

 

Canadian regulations are different than US regulations.

         

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Posted by rcdrye on Monday, January 26, 2015 9:26 AM

The CP/VTRS tank train operation from Albany to Burlington VT is still around as far as I know.  It replaced the bulk oil barges that came up the Champlain Canal in the mid-1980s. Gasoline, Diesel and #2 heating oil are all carried.

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Posted by JBlaine on Saturday, November 11, 2017 8:04 PM

I commissioned the facility and unloaded the first TankTrain at the Carson refinery back in 1983. The train consisted of six sets of 12 cars. Each 12 car set was pressurized with nitrogen to push the crude oil out. All six sets were unloaded simultaneously. It took four hours to unload a train. With the proper "persuasion", it was possible to unload a full train in a little over 90 minutes.

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Posted by BaltACD on Monday, November 13, 2017 8:17 PM

JBlaine
I commissioned the facility and unloaded the first TankTrain at the Carson refinery back in 1983. The train consisted of six sets of 12 cars. Each 12 car set was pressurized with nitrogen to push the crude oil out. All six sets were unloaded simultaneously. It took four hours to unload a train. With the proper "persuasion", it was possible to unload a full train in a little over 90 minutes.

How many cu. ft. of Nitrogen were required per train?

         

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Posted by tree68 on Monday, November 13, 2017 9:37 PM

BaltACD
How many cu. ft. of Nitrogen were required per train?

And could you recover any of it, or was it just vented to the atmosphere?

LarryWhistling
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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, November 14, 2017 3:46 AM

tree68
 
BaltACD
How many cu. ft. of Nitrogen were required per train? 

And could you recover any of it, or was it just vented to the atmosphere?

Probably left in the empty consist to reduce issues with vapors, then vented (perhaps through vapor separation for EPA reasons) incidentally when consist was refilled.  Around 78% of the atmosphere is nitrogen and it used to be relatively cheap to separate as a ‘by-product’ of LOX for steelmaking.

I suspect nowadays you would separate purge nitrogen ‘on site’ with molecular sieves as done in the packaging industry.  What was used then?  Pressure bottles or cryo?

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Posted by JBlaine on Tuesday, November 14, 2017 4:34 AM

The nitrogen was injected as opposed to the cars been pressurized. The crude was shipped at 140 degrees plus and relied on the expansion of the nitrogen through the cars to remove the oil. How much nitrogen? Wish I could answer that question, but it was over 30 years ago. I can tell you that the nitrogen was vented to atmosphere as the train was loaded in Bakersfield.

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Posted by rdamon on Tuesday, November 14, 2017 5:30 AM

The phone companies still pump nitrogen into their older copper lines to keep them dry ..

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