Why to stand back from moving trains

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  • Member since
    September, 2002
  • From: ShelbyTwp., Michigan
  • 392 posts
Posted by SD60MAC9500 on Friday, September 13, 2019 11:34 AM
Rahhhhhhhhh!!!!
  • Member since
    January, 2019
  • From: Henrico, VA
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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, September 13, 2019 1:07 PM

Oh brother!

Video One.  I'm no expert on railroad operations, far from it and wouldn't claim to be, but something  didn't seem right with that switch when the crewman threw the lever.  It seemed awful "bouncy," for lack of a better term, like something was preventing it from seating all the way.  I'm also surprised there was no way to lock it in place, but what do I know?

Video Two.  Man, who could see that  coming?

Thank God no-one was hurt in either incident!

  • Member since
    December, 2001
  • From: Northern New York
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Posted by tree68 on Friday, September 13, 2019 1:20 PM

Flintlock76
I'm also surprised there was no way to lock it in place, but what do I know?

There is, and it appeared to me that he did make sure the lock/latch was in place.  It also appeared that he verified the position of the points. The bounce in the lever is not unusual.

Odds are one of the cars picked the switch - perhaps a case of too sharp a profile on the flanges.

LarryWhistling
Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
Everyone goes home; Safety begins with you
My Opinion. Standard Disclaimers Apply. No Expiration Date
Come ride the rails with me!
There's one thing about humility - the moment you think you've got it, you've lost it...

  • Member since
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  • From: US
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Posted by BaltACD on Friday, September 13, 2019 1:35 PM

tree68
 
Flintlock76
I'm also surprised there was no way to lock it in place, but what do I know? 

There is, and it appeared to me that he did make sure the lock/latch was in place.  It also appeared that he verified the position of the points. The bounce in the lever is not unusual.

Odds are one of the cars picked the switch - perhaps a case of too sharp a profile on the flanges.

Sharp flange or a worn switch point.  There are keepers on 'switch ties' either side of the switch machine to secure the switch 'ball' and its activation bar.

 

Brakeman steps on the treadle on the left to release the switch ball and rod and observes that the rod and ball are secured on the other side when completing throwing the switch.  In the 2nd video it appears that both these things were done properly as well as the brakeman observing that the points did actually throw and mate against the stock rail.

  • Member since
    January, 2019
  • From: Henrico, VA
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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, September 13, 2019 2:58 PM

Thanks gents!

One thing's for certain.  I'll bet those raifans shooting video now know exactly  how those newsreel cameramen back in 1937 who caught the Hindenburg  disaster felt!

I mean, that wasn't supposed to happen either!

  • Member since
    March, 2003
  • From: Central Iowa
  • 4,870 posts
Posted by jeffhergert on Friday, September 13, 2019 7:28 PM

Today I heard a train report that the conductor's windshield had been shattered by a loose chain on a passing train.  The chain was able to swing up and hit the windshield.  

I once had a passing train throw some object up and break the glass in the number board of our engine.  This was an engine that had the number board above the cab instead of on the nose.

Jeff

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