Freight carloads continue to slump

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Posted by SD70Dude on Thursday, September 12, 2019 11:49 AM

charlie hebdo

I don't think anyone with half a brain thinks Chinese businesses are picking up the difference on all the tariffs levied on imports from there. 

Certain stable geniuses with very big brains would disagree with you.

Greetings from Alberta

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Posted by zardoz on Thursday, September 12, 2019 12:04 PM

Euclid
....That is by creating a monumental recession/depression that sets us all back a decade or so.

A decade sounds about right, it takes us back to the wonderful economic times of 2008-09. Joy. I wonder where all this tariff tax money that trump is collecting goes. Maybe one of his golf courses needs new greens.

Chris Wallace is the only person on Fox worth watching; the rest are merely mouthpieces for the current administrations' propaganda machine. 

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Posted by SD70Dude on Thursday, September 12, 2019 12:14 PM

zardoz

Chris Wallace is the only person on Fox worth watching; the rest are merely mouthpieces for the current administrations' propaganda machine. 

I do like their SNL counterparts, those sketches write themselves!

Greetings from Alberta

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Posted by SD60MAC9500 on Thursday, September 12, 2019 1:20 PM

In the end society is always the loser.. People just don't seem to realize this when caught up in political propaganda..

Rahhhhhhhhh!!!!
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Posted by Psychot on Friday, September 13, 2019 2:11 AM

CSSHEGEWISCH

I believe that Trump and his followers are trying to return to a world that doesn't exist anymore, being the postwar period from about 1945 to 1963 when the United States dominated world commerce.   This situation existed largely because the rest of the Western world was still rebuilding from WW2 and the Eastern bloc was not really a part of the world market for ideological reasons.  Both of those factors are not really in play anymore.

 

 

Bingo. And the problem is exacerbated by the fact that we, as a country and a society, have done very little to help the workforce adjust to the emerging new reality. 

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Posted by charlie hebdo on Friday, September 13, 2019 10:58 AM

zardoz

 

 
Euclid
....That is by creating a monumental recession/depression that sets us all back a decade or so.

 

A decade sounds about right, it takes us back to the wonderful economic times of 2008-09. Joy. I wonder where all this tariff tax money that trump is collecting goes. Maybe one of his golf courses needs new greens.

 

Chris Wallace is the only person on Fox worth watching; the rest are merely mouthpieces for the current administrations' propaganda machine. 

 

The other good ones left.  The only other decent one left is Shep Smith. 

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Posted by charlie hebdo on Friday, September 13, 2019 10:59 AM

Psychot

 

 
CSSHEGEWISCH

I believe that Trump and his followers are trying to return to a world that doesn't exist anymore, being the postwar period from about 1945 to 1963 when the United States dominated world commerce.   This situation existed largely because the rest of the Western world was still rebuilding from WW2 and the Eastern bloc was not really a part of the world market for ideological reasons.  Both of those factors are not really in play anymore.

 

 

 

 

Bingo. And the problem is exacerbated by the fact that we, as a country and a society, have done very little to help the workforce adjust to the emerging new reality. 

 

Right on!! 

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Posted by tree68 on Friday, September 13, 2019 1:25 PM

Psychot
And the problem is exacerbated by the fact that we, as a country and a society, have done very little to help the workforce adjust to the emerging new reality. 

That, and the fact that for too many years labor enthusiastically embraced Eugene Debs' exhortation in the early days of union organization.

"More!"

We priced ourselves out of the world labor market years ago, during that time when we were the dominant economic force in the world.  Now we're paying the price.

 

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Posted by BaltACD on Friday, September 13, 2019 1:45 PM

A 40's English documentary on the design and production of the Rolls-Royce Merlin aviation engine.  Note the number of times 'unskilled' is mentioned in the narration.

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Posted by zugmann on Friday, September 13, 2019 2:57 PM

Psychot
Bingo. And the problem is exacerbated by the fact that we, as a country and a society, have done very little to help the workforce adjust to the emerging new reality.

And even if people do want to adjust/retrain, the simple fact we tie healthcare to our jobs mean that very few can take the opportunity/risk.

 The opinions expressed here represent my own and not those of my employer or any other railroad, company, or person.

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Posted by matthewsaggie on Friday, September 13, 2019 3:24 PM

If you get to Dayton Ohio be sure to visit the Packard museum there. They built Merlin's under license from R-R during the war for the P-51 and others. Interesting exhibit of some of the early problems, such as converting the plans from metric to english, problems with the prototypes that R-R provided that didn't match the plans, reflecting changes that had been made on the shop floor on the fly there in Derby but not documented, etc. Fascinating exhibit. They also have a display of Packard PT boat engines, which were enormous. 

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Posted by charlie hebdo on Friday, September 13, 2019 7:21 PM

zugmann

 

 
Psychot
Bingo. And the problem is exacerbated by the fact that we, as a country and a society, have done very little to help the workforce adjust to the emerging new reality.

 

And even if people do want to adjust/retrain, the simple fact we tie healthcare to our jobs mean that very few can take the opportunity/risk.

 

Standardized plans and public option with total portability should solve that problem.  Example: the German health insurance model. 

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Posted by charlie hebdo on Friday, September 13, 2019 7:23 PM

matthewsaggie

If you get to Dayton Ohio be sure to visit the Packard museum there. They built Merlin's under license from R-R during the war for the P-51 and ot

hers. Interesting exhibit of some of the early problems, such as converting the plans from metric to english, problems with the prototypes that R-R provided that didn't match the plans, reflecting changes that had been made on the shop floor on the fly there in Derby but not documented, etc. Fascinating exhibit. They also have a display of Packard PT boat engines, which were enormous. 

 

Thanks for the informative.  I always thought RR and all British products were still on Imperial measures at that time. 

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Posted by BaltACD on Friday, September 13, 2019 8:29 PM

charlie hebdo
 
zugmann 
Psychot
Bingo. And the problem is exacerbated by the fact that we, as a country and a society, have done very little to help the workforce adjust to the emerging new reality. 

And even if people do want to adjust/retrain, the simple fact we tie healthcare to our jobs mean that very few can take the opportunity/risk. 

Standardized plans and public option with total portability should solve that problem.  Example: the German health insurance model. 

In the USA we can't even agree on Yard or Meters, and have wrecked some spacecraft because of the differences.

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Posted by Psychot on Sunday, September 15, 2019 2:54 AM

tree68

 

 
Psychot
And the problem is exacerbated by the fact that we, as a country and a society, have done very little to help the workforce adjust to the emerging new reality. 

 

That, and the fact that for too many years labor enthusiastically embraced Eugene Debs' exhortation in the early days of union organization.

"More!"

We priced ourselves out of the world labor market years ago, during that time when we were the dominant economic force in the world.  Now we're paying the price.

 

 

Very true, and there’s no better example than unions forcing railroads to keep 5-man train crews for decades after diesel locomotives and air brakes made the positions of fireman and brakeman obsolete. I remember watching cabooses roll by with the rear brakeman sitting up in the cupola watching the scenery go by and thinking “man, that’s a good gig if you can get it.”

Unions came about for a very good reason, because industrial workers were being exploited and mistreated. But there’s no question they overstepped their bounds—and in doing so, they did a great disservice to their members in the long run.

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Posted by Psychot on Sunday, September 15, 2019 2:59 AM

charlie hebdo

 

 
zugmann

 

 
Psychot
Bingo. And the problem is exacerbated by the fact that we, as a country and a society, have done very little to help the workforce adjust to the emerging new reality.

 

And even if people do want to adjust/retrain, the simple fact we tie healthcare to our jobs mean that very few can take the opportunity/risk.

 

 

 

Standardized plans and public option with total portability should solve that problem.  Example: the German health insurance model. 

 

Another thing we could borrow from the Germans is cooperation between industry and unions, including giving the unions a seat on corporate boards. That would go a long way toward eliminating the destructive adversarial relationship between business and union labor which both sides had their part in creating.

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Posted by charlie hebdo on Sunday, September 15, 2019 10:54 AM

Psychot

 

 
charlie hebdo

 

 
zugmann

 

 
Psychot
Bingo. And the problem is exacerbated by the fact that we, as a country and a society, have done very little to help the workforce adjust to the emerging new reality.

 

And even if people do want to adjust/retrain, the simple fact we tie healthcare to our jobs mean that very few can take the opportunity/risk.

 

 

 

Standardized plans and public option with total portability should solve that problem.  Example: the German health insurance model. 

 

 

 

Another thing we could borrow from the Germans is cooperation between industry and unions, including giving the unions a seat on corporate boards. That would go a long way toward eliminating the destructive adversarial relationship between business and union labor which both sides had their part in creating.

 

That's not going to happen here. 

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