Techno frustration, again

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Posted by Deggesty on Friday, August 09, 2019 10:21 AM

Another mention of ozone--did you ever see a rectifier tube that was filled with ozone at work?--a beautiful purple glow inside the tube  (no filiament, just cathode, plate (anode), and ozone.

Johnny

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, August 09, 2019 11:56 AM

Deggesty

Another mention of ozone--did you ever see a rectifier tube that was filled with ozone at work?--a beautiful purple glow inside the tube  (no filiament, just cathode, plate (anode), and ozone.

 

No, but the corona wires inside the copiers I used to work on had a purple glow around them while energized, interesting to see.

The new machines have them pretty well shielded, so the glow isn't as observable as it once was, or not observable at all.  Made them harder to diagnose and work on.

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Posted by Lithonia Operator on Friday, August 09, 2019 1:21 PM

York1

Lithonia Operator

 What places have you been the past several days?

 

 
Hi York,
 
We left Camden ($1500 lighter). Went to Carver Cove on the island of Vinalhaven, at the east end of the Fox Island Thorofare, in Penobscot Bay; spent two nights there. Continued eastward, getting near The Acadia area, spending a night in Mackerel Cove, on the north side of Swans Island. From Swans we moved on to Southwest Harbor, which is on Mt. Desert Island, where Acadia NP is located. This was scheduled as a re-provisioning stop, and a for a meet-up with my sister, who drove up from Massachusetts. The plan was to take her on a four-night mini-cruise to locations in this area. Mother Nature had other plans. First came dense fog, so we stayed put for a night. Then there approached a nasty weather system. The mooring we were on was exposed to the SE, and the forecast was for 13-17 knots from the SE, with gusts to 25 knots, torrential rain, and 5-foot seas. We tried to move, through the fog, to a better harbor, but found out there was no room for us, so had to turn around. Went back to the mooring, which fortunately was still available. Then, after pondering what was going to be 24-36 hours of being cramped inside the cabin of a bucking bronco, we threw in the towel. For the first time in 32 years of cruising, we booked a hotel room for two nights, and got the hell out of Dodge. The weather truly sucked, and we were glad we made that decision, enjoying shoreside amenities, eating out, etc, making use of my sister’s car. Saw, but did not ride, the Downeast Scenic Railroad. Came back to boat this morning, then made the short hop over to mega-scenic Northeast Harbor, also on Mt. Desert Island, where we are currently hanging out in gorgeous weather. Two of us are reading books. One is on the web, and that latter individual is mere minutes away from commencing to nap.  
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Posted by Miningman on Friday, August 09, 2019 1:39 PM

Purple Haze

Acting funny and I don't know why

'scuse me while I kiss the sky

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, August 09, 2019 3:29 PM

Never cared for Hendrix, thought it was so much noise, but WOW, what kind of rock/mineral is that?  Is it under UV light (I suspect it is) or does it always look like that?

And if it always looks like that, is it safe?

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Posted by Lithonia Operator on Friday, August 09, 2019 4:07 PM

Please note that in my most recent post there was a brief railroad mention.

Cool

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Posted by Miningman on Friday, August 09, 2019 4:11 PM

The rock is NOT under UV light, just normal room lighting. NO it is not safe. I wouldn't recommend licking it! ( Geologists lick rocks all the time), also don't sprinkle on your cereal. It's safe as stored and handled.

It is stored away, wrapped in lead in a lead lined suitcase sealed in a lead lined barrel 30 feet up by an exhaust fan which vents out any radon gas. It is secretly under care by 2 people. The room is massive and is specially built for storage of radioactive core samples with prism stations for continuous monitoring. 

We open 'er up once a year to show new students. We give ourselves less than a minute, more like 20 seconds. 

It comes from one of our Uranium Mines from years ago. 

Except for the third eye I've acquired in the back of my head I'm fine! 

There was an in depth discussion on this maybe 2 years ago on String Lining. Also look up Gabon Reactors. 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, August 09, 2019 4:17 PM

Yikes!  Goes without saying, you be careful, or you'll be riding the "Night Train" sooner than you should!  (Railroad reference.)

On the other hand, I suppose that third eye in the back of your head comes in handing for making sure your students aren't goofing off!

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Posted by SD70Dude on Friday, August 09, 2019 4:25 PM

As long as you limit exposure, and don't play with that stuff a-la Louis Slotin, you should be fine.  An amazing sight to be sure!

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by Lithonia Operator on Friday, August 09, 2019 6:25 PM

Flintlock76

riding the "Night Train" sooner than you should!  (Railroad reference.)

Big SmileYes

 

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Posted by Paul of Covington on Friday, August 09, 2019 7:03 PM

Lithonia Operator

Please note that in my most recent post there was a brief railroad mention.

Sleep

 

   Here's a railroad related question.   Mooring buoys: I know of nowhere around here where they are used, but from what I've read, they're quite common in New England.   I read sometime ago that someone got some old locomotive wheels to use as an anchor for a mooring buoy.   Have you heard of that, and if so, is it a common practice?

_____________

   "A stranger is just a friend you ain't met yet."  ___ Dave Gardner

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Posted by Lithonia Operator on Friday, August 09, 2019 7:22 PM

Paul of Covington

 

 
Lithonia Operator

Please note that in my most recent post there was a brief railroad mention.

Sleep

 

 

 

   Here's a railroad related question.   Mooring buoys: I know of nowhere around here where they are used, but from what I've read, they're quite common in New England.   I read sometime ago that someone got some old locomotive wheels to use as an anchor for a mooring buoy.   Have you heard of that, and if so, is it a common practice?

 

Never heard about that.

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Posted by Overmod on Saturday, August 10, 2019 6:08 AM

Deggesty
Another mention of ozone--did you ever see a rectifier tube that was filled with ozone at work?--a beautiful purple glow inside the tube  (no filament, just cathode, plate (anode), and ozone.

I thought that was mercury vapor, not ozone.  All the oxygen would have been gettered (in a glass-envelope tube) long before significant power was applied across it, or so I would think.

Fixed mercury-pool rectifiers, like the ones on the original 3000V Lackawanna electrification circa 1928, may have had some air inside the tank to be excited during arc conduction.  As the punchline went in a less PC age: "i don't know,,, I never looked."

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Posted by Deggesty on Saturday, August 10, 2019 8:00 AM

You may be right; the rectifier was an OZ-4--and that was about 70 years ago. I used it in a power supply that I built to run an amplifier that I built. I also used a rectifier which had a 5 volt filament, which simply had a slight red glow.

Johnny

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Posted by Lithonia Operator on Saturday, August 10, 2019 3:11 PM

Is this just me? Often, here on the phone, on this forum, in the little boxes at the bottom with links to other pages in the thread, I will get these numerals:

-1, 0, 1, 2, 3

etc.

Just sometimes, not all the time.

???

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Posted by SD70Dude on Saturday, August 10, 2019 3:37 PM

It's a software glitch.  I get it too.  Only seems to do it on page 5.

Overmod - I updated Firefox and now I have the PM problems too.  Sigh.

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by York1 on Saturday, August 10, 2019 3:43 PM

Lithonia Operator
Is this just me? Often, here on the phone, on this forum, in the little boxes at the bottom with links to other pages in the thread, I will get these numerals: -1, 0, 1, 2, 3

 

I think it's called the Page 6 glitch.  On the next page, the numbering will go back to normal.  It's very aggravating if you are trying to find a posting on the previous page.

John

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Posted by Lithonia Operator on Tuesday, August 20, 2019 7:17 PM

After 34 days, our sailing trip is over. It was a great one, despite our engine incident. Sleeping tonite on our mooring, driving home tomorrow. Hoping 6-8 auto races that were supposed to record while we were away actually in fact did. Car racing (F1 and IndyCar) is my favorite sport, and in anticipation of watching theses races, I have not looked at any racing news in over a month. (But I did hear about the Dale, Jr. plane crash, and miraculous outcome.) Technology can be great: I can now go back in time and catch up on my races.

Sans TV and movies, you folks have been a great source of entertainment.

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Posted by York1 on Tuesday, August 20, 2019 8:20 PM

Thanks for sharing your trip with us.

John

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Posted by MikeF90 on Wednesday, August 21, 2019 5:30 PM

@Miningman, do you know what the name of the beautiful, flourescent and radioactive mineral is?  I could not track it down definitively.

 

Links to my Google Maps ---> Sunset Route overview, SoCal metro, Yuma sub, Gila sub, SR east of Tucson, BNSF Northern Transcon and Southern Transcon

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Posted by Miningman on Wednesday, August 21, 2019 6:34 PM

Pitchblende.

The sample and the mined orebody came from the Sue C Pit located in the Athabasca Basin here in Northern Saskatchewan. 

There were many seperate lenses of ore composed of fragments of Quartz-cordierite-garnet gneiss supported by pitchblende.

These occurred as very dark bands and easy to distinguish the ore from the waste rock. 

I have attached the geological report of the Sue C Pit 

It is good reading and loaded with information.

See Minerology starting on page 12. The sample came from the massive type occurance as described on page 15.

http://publications.gov.sk.ca/documents/310/88703-tourignyetal.pdf

 

 

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